Hs senior in need of advice please!

Posted
by MelaneyL MelaneyL (New) New

Okay, so I am a High school senior who wants to be an oncology nurse and I was wondering, can I go to a community college for 2 years to recieve my preqreuisites, THEN transfer to a University? Or do you think it would be better to just go straight to a university?

cardiacfreak

cardiacfreak, ADN

Specializes in Hospice. 742 Posts

Which ever is more economical for your situation. Goodluck.

MelaneyL

MelaneyL

3 Posts

So either one is fine? I wasn't sure if people actually transferred from community college to a University.

MelaneyL

MelaneyL

3 Posts

Which route did you go?

Racer15, BSN, RN

Specializes in ED. Has 5 years experience. 707 Posts

I did things a little backwards. I got a bachelors degree from a university. Not a nursing degree. Decided to back to be a nurse, went through a community college for my ADN. Now I'm getting my BSN online while working full time as a nurse. But yes, many people get their prerequisites from community colleges and then transfer. Financially it's a smart plan, especially if you live at home during that time.

poopylala

poopylala, BSN, RN

Specializes in Burn ICU. Has 6 years experience. 97 Posts

You can definitely do community college and transfer. So many people do that and it's not necessarily better or worse. Just depends on the school and what you can afford :)

applewhitern, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU. Has 30 years experience. 1,871 Posts

Just make sure the college you plan to transfer to will accept the credits you take at the community college. Some classes may not transfer.

Okay, so I am a High school senior who wants to be an oncology nurse and I was wondering, can I go to a community college for 2 years to recieve my preqreuisites, THEN transfer to a University? Or do you think it would be better to just go straight to a university?

I went to nursing school with a few people that went to community college and then transferred to a university BSN program. It worked out well for them. If you live somewhere like Tennessee, then I'd go that route as I believe community college is now free for residents. These days, the less loan debt the better. I feel bad for your generation. It used to be that someone working part time while going to school could pay all of their tuition at a public university- but those days are long gone.

matcha-cat

matcha-cat

136 Posts

This might interest you- many colleges offer RN to BSN options. My current community college and the one I'm transferring to (in a different state) both have options that allow you to get your RN at their school, and then transfer to a university to get your BSN.

I personally really like the atmosphere of community college. I like the smaller campus size and small classes, and financially, it makes a lot more sense. It may also give you a chance to improve your GPA if it's not quite at the level needed to go to your dream school.

audreysmagic, RN

Specializes in Psych, Peds, Education, Infection Control. Has 15 years experience. 458 Posts

I did the "community college, then transfer" - actually, working on that second degree now. It was 13 years apart, though...which I do not recommend. If you do get the associate degree, I HIGHLY encourage you to continue directly while you still have momentum and the classes are recent. (I had to retake one class simply because it had been over five years, but it was a technology class, so I totally get why.) Transfer into the university program (you'll usually enter as a junior, but consult the advisors) as soon as possible. It can save you money, definitely, to start at a community college, but as others have said, check with both the college and the university you intend to go to in order to see what will transfer. Some community colleges have agreements with local universities for automatic admission for their graduates; you might look into that too. Good luck, whatever you decide!

WanderRN

WanderRN

19 Posts

I just graduated from community college with my RN, will get the RN-BSN started next year but I wanted to get started working sooner.

quiltynurse56, LPN, LVN

Specializes in LTC and Pediatrics. Has 3 years experience. 953 Posts

Or, you can get the ADN through your community college and then do the RN to BSN. In my area, community colleges work with the universities for this.