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HRSA: Is Nurse Corps Scholarship Program Worth It?

Nurses   (1,271 Views 2 Comments)

UnapologeticallyCurly has 1 years experience .

582 Profile Views; 25 Posts

Hey everyone,

Like many, I'm broke and looking at all my options to help fund my BSN. At the moment, I'm not enrolled or admitted to any nursing program. I'm applying to transfer to a 4-year this Fall (2018) to begin during the 2019 term. I'm 23 with low-income parents. I'm a dependent student and can't fund myself, my family can't fund me either.

I've been reading through the Nurse Corps informational guide online located:

https://bhw.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/bhw/nurse-corps-guidance.pdf

I know they're repaying your debt, but it seems like a steep price to pay. They're ridiculously strict, which makes me anxious. You can't repeat any classes, you must be in good academic standing with your program, must be full-time, and essentially have no other income. After graduation, you have 9 months to find a job at a "nursing shortage-care facility". If they funded you for 2 years, you must work at a qualifying location for a minimum of 2 years; if 2.5 years funded, 3 years working; if 4 years funded, 4 years working. You can't take more than 35 days off for any reason. They say that in dire circumstances (e.g. extreme financial hardship or death of a loved one), they give you up to 1 year "off"; or 16 weeks for maternity leave. From the phrasing, it seems like these cases are rarely granted... It worries me because I do have a chronic medical condition (T1 diabetes) and in all honesty, anything can happen at any time. Also, I plan on moving cross county, leaving my elderly parents behind. I'm an only child, so I foresee myself having responsibilities with my parents and helping them with my grandparents later on.

Has anyone participated in this scholarship program? The rules seem very stringent. I'm worried that working at a nursing shortage care facility will leave me with limited options... If I have to spend the first 2-3 years of my career in a low-income clinic or primary care facility, I'm worried that I won't be able to find better employment later on. Did this limit your job opportunities after the program? Is it truly that strict? Am I just better off repaying loans?

Please help, all advice is welcomed.

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