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How to Remain Relevant as You Age

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Carol Ebert is a MSN, RN and specializes in Wellness and Coaching for Women in their Third Act.

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It seems once you reach your Third Act there is a never ending stream of revelations you never knew, or paid attention to before.  Not just that some body parts and functions are changing, and not always for the better, but also changes in professional strengths.  Here are a few to consider. You are reading page 2 of How to Remain Relevant as You Age. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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On 6/29/2019 at 3:26 PM, morelostthanfound said:

Nice article and thank you for your personal insights.  While I agree with the need for all nurses to stay relevant in an ever-changing profession by taking periodic inventory of their personal assets/limitations, I also feel that we, as 'seasoned' nurses, are systematically devalued in many ways.  By virtue of our many years of varied experience, most older nurses have much to contribute in terms of patient care and in the mentoring of our younger colleagues.  However, it seems that many hospitals routinely 'target' some experienced nurses or pass them over entirely when they initially apply for a job in lieu of an ofter younger, inexperienced graduate nurse (with lower salary demands)-yes, I know there are outliers and this is not the rule everywhere, but from my perspective in many hospital systems, it seems to be a disturbing trend.   This is not only demoralizing and defeating, but what commentary does this make on our profession?  Are there other professions that demand their members be relevant and legitimized?

I hate when I hear in an interview how impressed they are with my experience and then I never hear from them again.  

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On 6/30/2019 at 9:31 AM, traumaRUs said:

I can relate to much of this. I was a second career RN - became a nurse in my 30's. By my late 40's I realized I needed to further my career in order to stay relevant. Getting a grad degree was my key to longevity. I'm now....uh...lets just say >50 (like way older) but I still am clinically relevant, able to care for pts, keep up with my peers (ages 30-50) and still meet the demands of my job. 

For me, some of the things I've done (because I need to work probably another 10 years):

1. Keep clinically focused by CME, studying on my own.

2. Keep up with social media and technology - this is the quickest death to your career IMHO for older workers. 

3. Remain very professional. I don't share my personal issues with colleagues. 

4. I don't mention any physical issues - there is one co-worker who is not thought of as a team player because they frequently try to get out of work by playing the "age card."

Totally agree that sometimes a job needs to change as you get older - for me, I went back to school and switched out of a very busy ED to a private practice. 

Best wishes for everyone. 

I have done and will continue to do all of these things at least for another 9 years.  I have not seen any value in it yet though.  Still applying for positions.

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

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5 hours ago, Forest2 said:

I have done and will continue to do all of these things at least for another 9 years.  I have not seen any value in it yet though.  Still applying for positions.

Are you an APRN

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Does anyone remember the birthday party for a 90-year-old RN who was STILL WORKING IN THE OR??? Age is a number...I agree that discrimination for experienced nurses happens. It also is due to facilities not wanting to pay what experienced nurses are worth.

 

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This article is mostly anecdotal and contends that fluid and crystallized memory and function are on an irreversible, one-way trajectory. Research is inconclusive with respect to this; the research is in its infancy and results are in conflict.  As with physiological health, mental function is multi-factorial.  This article makes sweeping generalizations and has a defeatist tone.  Read Benner again, it was required reading when I was in school, and then perhaps do some self-reflection on your perceived value to nursing.  The speed of one's fluid thinking, vs. the high quality of crystallized thinking - where on the continuum is nursing care of greatest value?  I will opt for a few nanoseconds of slower speed, combined with expert-level clinical reasoning borne out of years of experience.

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