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How do you give notice?

Nurses   (248 Views 3 Comments)
by HiddencatBSN HiddencatBSN (Member)

33 Likes; 557 Visitors; 70 Posts

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When leaving a job, I've always made a point to go in person and verbally give notice and then hand a letter with the same information (statement that I am giving notice, last day I will work, and a thank you for the opportunity provided). 

But it seems like a benefit to giving notice by email is that I can ultimately give a couple days longer notice, copy all supervisors directly instead of picking one to start with, and avoid being present for their initial reaction.

So what do you all do and why?

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212 Likes; 7,862 Visitors; 723 Posts

Depends greatly on the type of relationship you have with your nurse manager(s), and the type of impression you want to leave.

I did as you stated in the first paragraph with my first psych job. I truly enjoyed working there but wanted to branch out. I was invited to stay per diem, which I have done for the last year. 

I recently left my second per diem ED psych job (I work FT neuro ICU btw). It was a difficult place to work; I hardly saw the NM nor the 2 assistant NM and did not feel valued. Nurses hated to be rotated to the psych pod, and it made working there much more difficult for me. Since I rarely saw a NM I emailed my letter.

So it all depends. If I were to leave my FT neuro gig in the future I’d do so in person as I do feel valued and respected; I’d treat them likewise. They’ve taught me a great deal.

But that’s just me.

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40 Likes; 2 Followers; 44,033 Visitors; 5,234 Posts

As a travel nurse, I've only had to quit once (my one and only staff job). But I do have some relevant advice. Get written references long before you even consider leaving. In fact, get them at regular intervals (I start about two weeks into an assignment and try to get three per assignment. This helps protect you should there be any performance issue at work, and makes it easier when you resign. No begging after the fact for references. The folks you ask may be taken aback (yes, get them from the charge nurses, managers, and even directors and physicians), just say they are for maintaining your professional portfolio. These written references are far better than phone references and can be included in your interview with good effect.

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