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How do you feel on displaying your certification credentials on your badge?

Nurses   (8,582 Views 189 Comments)

choksantos has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiac TCU /tele/SDU.

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choksantos has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiac TCU /tele/SDU.

67 Posts; 2,114 Profile Views

32 minutes ago, Salisburysteak said:

I have no idea what some of them mean also! 😂 

it is great you get certified in a specialty but, in the grand scheme of things the patient will never really understand what it means. 

Being certified for me is a way to for myself to learn new things or reinforce my knowledge, because without a goal for me to pass a test, I don't think I would study. It's a good point that patients will not know what it is and it might even confuse them, though we are suppose to introduce ourselves as nurses, but I also hear that seeing applicable certs in one's badge may inspire people to get certified too which has it own benefits. working towards a goal, learning and relearning being quite a few.

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

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2 hours ago, Crash_Cart said:

 

I think a display of alphabet soup letters will only confuse them.  They have absolutely no idea what any of those letters mean, nor do they really care anyways. 

Wait, so will it confuse them, or will they not care? It's either one or the other. I would guess that it's probably the latter for most people. However, I recently had surgery and my pre/post-op nurse had a certification on her badge, which I asked her what it was (sorry, can't remember, was high on Fentanyl and Versed). While I would not have felt any LESS about her competency if she hadn't had it there, it pleased me that she was the type of nurse who put emphasis on obtaining that certification. So for me (and perhaps other patients in healthcare), it DOES make a difference.

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choksantos has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiac TCU /tele/SDU.

67 Posts; 2,114 Profile Views

5 minutes ago, klone said:

Wait, so will it confuse them, or will they not care? It's either one or the other. I would guess that it's probably the latter for most people. However, I recently had surgery and my pre/post-op nurse had a certification on her badge, which I asked her what it was (sorry, can't remember, was high on Fentanyl and Versed). While I would not have felt any LESS about her competency if she hadn't had it there, it pleased me that she was the type of nurse who put emphasis on obtaining that certification. So for me (and perhaps other patients in healthcare), it DOES make a difference.

that's a really good point too.

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As an LPN with an advanced degree, I feel proud of displaying my credentials. Especially since most nurses have not completed college beyond an Associate's degree. One additional point to mention is that practitioners who are truly proud and consider themselves to be prestigious are always introducing themselves as either Doctor, Nurse, etc. I notice patients will have to ask what the practitioner's role is if he/she is a tech or a non-medical provider. This is another reason why I think badges revealing the credentials are great. They allow people to see who does what, along with their level of expertise.

Kindly,

Divine-LPN, BSN

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Salisburysteak is a ADN, RN and specializes in Long-term Acute Care.

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7 hours ago, Divine-LPN,BSN said:

As an LPN with an advanced degree, I feel proud of displaying my credentials. Especially since most nurses have not completed college beyond an Associate's degree. One additional point to mention is that practitioners who are truly proud and consider themselves to be prestigious are always introducing themselves as either Doctor, Nurse, etc. I notice patients will have to ask what the practitioner's role is if he/she is a tech or a non-medical provider. This is another reason why I think badges revealing the credentials are great. They allow people to see who does what, along with their level of expertise.

Kindly,

Divine-LPN, BSN

I do have a question. Since you have a BSN, why aren’t you an RN? Why have a degree that you really cannot use. Your scope as an LPN is limited. I do not know if that question has been asked and answered. I just cannot wrap my head around someone who would work there butt off getting a BSN and NOT take the NCLEX-RN. I believe it may hurt you in the long run. That is just my observation. 

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11 hours ago, Nurse.Kelsey said:

Ive NEVER seen someone put acls, or pals after their name

I've seen some put S.T.A.B.L.E. on theirs so I wouldn't put it past anyone!

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Rose_Queen is a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

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1 hour ago, Salisburysteak said:

I do have a question. Since you have a BSN, why aren’t you an RN? Why have a degree that you really cannot use. Your scope as an LPN is limited. I do not know if that question has been asked and answered. I just cannot wrap my head around someone who would work there butt off getting a BSN and NOT take the NCLEX-RN. I believe it may hurt you in the long run. That is just my observation. 

There’s an entire thread dedicated to that somewhere. 

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Pixie.RN has 11 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

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1 hour ago, Wuzzie said:

I've seen some put S.T.A.B.L.E. on theirs so I wouldn't put it past anyone!

I would like to see U.N.S.T.A.B.L.E. on a badge. 😆

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Rose_Queen is a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

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3 minutes ago, Pixie.RN said:

I would like to see U.N.S.T.A.B.L.E. on a badge. 😆

How about registered nut instead of nurse?

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Pixie.RN has 11 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

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1 minute ago, Rose_Queen said:

How about registered nut instead of nurse?

Things I have heard in the ED:

"RN does not mean Real Nice."

"RN does not mean Refreshments and Narcotics."

Perhaps said to less-than-nice patients... 

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On 9/11/2019 at 10:14 PM, murseman24 said:

As long as it doesn't look like alphabet soup.  Maybe ONE certification after you HIGHEST degree earned. ex: BSN, CCRN.  Not BSN, ADN, RN-BC CCRN-CMC, ACLS, ABCDEFGH, BBQ

LOL, I want the BBQ designation! 😄

 

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10 hours ago, Salisburysteak said:

I do have a question. Since you have a BSN, why aren’t you an RN? Why have a degree that you really cannot use. Your scope as an LPN is limited. I do not know if that question has been asked and answered. I just cannot wrap my head around someone who would work there butt off getting a BSN and NOT take the NCLEX-RN. I believe it may hurt you in the long run. That is just my observation. 

I'm proud and satisfied with my credentials. It wasn't a waste for me. I can earn a high salary and work anywhere with my degree and nursing license combined. The earning potential and opportunities are so vast that I am back in college working on a graduate degree. There are many misconceptions about my nursing license. For any additional information regarding my credentials feel free to read content in my profile. 

Kindly,

Divine-LPN, BSN

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