How can I learn to be "rougher" with patients

Posted
by MDBoy MDBoy Member Nurse Student

Specializes in Nursing. Has 3 years experience.

I am very hesitant when touching patients, and want to be as delicate as possible, but I know that in the long run this is going to be a detriment to providing the best level of care I can. Is it just a matter of getting more and more experiences and becoming more insensitized to it? I am very conscious of the fact I'm a male and my appearance is somewhat intimidating as I am a big guy so I overcompensate in the other direction I suppose....

cardiacfreak

cardiacfreak, ADN

Specializes in Hospice. 742 Posts

If I need my derriere cleaned I would appreciate a delicate hand instead of a rough hand.  If I need CPR PLEASE don't be delicate, I need you to push fast and hard.

Most little ol' ladies say, "You're being to rough!". So they would probably love you!

akulahawkRN, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 7 years experience. 3,488 Posts

Well, there is a certain level of necessary roughness needed but you have to know when to be a little more "rough" and when to be more "delicate." Clearly when pericare needs to be done, more "delicate" is needed. 

Sometimes that necessary roughness is firmly anchoring an arm while quickly but delicately placing an IV line.

Learning this doesn't take forever but it isn't learned overnight either. 

Sour Lemon

Has 12 years experience. 5,016 Posts

7 hours ago, MDBoy said:

I am very hesitant when touching patients, and want to be as delicate as possible, but I know that in the long run this is going to be a detriment to providing the best level of care I can. Is it just a matter of getting more and more experiences and becoming more insensitized to it? I am very conscious of the fact I'm a male and my appearance is somewhat intimidating as I am a big guy so I overcompensate in the other direction I suppose....

It doesn’t sound like rough is what you’re going for, maybe it’s efficiency? 
If you feel like you might be intimidating to patients, the best course of action would probably be to describe exactly what you’re about to do, gauge their response, and encourage any questions they might have. Actually, I think that’s a great approach for all staff. It allows you to move through the steps quickly because everyone knows what’s going on. 

TriciaJ, RN

Specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory. Has 41 years experience. 4,292 Posts

I agree with Sour Lemon.  Explain to the patient what you're going to do, ask if there are any concerns or objections and "Let me know if I'm hurting you".

 

MDBoy

MDBoy

Specializes in Nursing. Has 3 years experience. 52 Posts

6 hours ago, Sour Lemon said:

It doesn’t sound like rough is what you’re going for, maybe it’s efficiency? 
If you feel like you might be intimidating to patients, the best course of action would probably be to describe exactly what you’re about to do, gauge their response, and encourage any questions they might have. Actually, I think that’s a great approach for all staff. It allows you to move through the steps quickly because everyone knows what’s going on. 

I love this answer!! Thanks 

JKL33

6,326 Posts

Are you talking about a matter of self-confidence? What are the chances that is wrapped up in here somewhere?