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Hospitals Firing Seasoned Nurses: Nurses FIGHT Back!

Nurses Article   (1,405,401 Views 722 Replies 812 Words)

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Facilities are firing seasoned, higher paid nurses and utilizing younger less experienced nurses. This cost-cutting measure is putting patients at risk, working nursing and support staff to the point of exhaustion, and causing staff to leave the profession. How can we get administrators to see that these measures are not effective and can cost lives? You are reading page 56 of Hospitals Firing Seasoned Nurses: Nurses FIGHT Back!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Ryn RN has 30+ years experience and specializes in ER, ICU plus many other.

49 Posts; 2,305 Profile Views

Exact and on the point! I have been in many aspects of nursing and always loved it! I quit bedside nearly 2 years ago and now more have left! They want more, and more, and more! And you are right, they sit in their office looking at pie graph and charts telling them we should be able to do more! Then the funny part, they wonder why people are leaving "how can we keep people?". Bottom line, treat nurses , and all employees, with the respect, kindness and dignity you expect us to display to an ever demanding, unappreciative patient population! Not to mention sicker and bigger than ever before! I could go on and on but I think everyone gets the point from OP post. Good Luck to all you new nurses out there, I can't tell you how glad I am that I'm not just starting in nursing. It's a very sad situation!

Edited by Ryn RN
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Ryn RN has 30+ years experience and specializes in ER, ICU plus many other.

49 Posts; 2,305 Profile Views

Yes but the hospital will get rid of you! They don't have to prove a thing!

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9 Posts; 647 Profile Views

Unions can only do so much...my husband was fired from an OR and then blacklisted in the community...we relocated and he took a position at a hospital with a strong union....he likes it and he is liked but really, same problems, different day....we are hoping b/c of the union he will not be fired due to his age/experience (he was 62 when he was fired...in excellent health and an awesome nurse). The hospital he was fired from set him up..no improvement plan, no sub par evaluations...I worked at the same place so it wasn't really a surprise...unethical to the core!

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1 Post; 123 Profile Views

Nurses need to wake up and smell the roses. All nurses in hospitalk need to be unionized. Don't give me that c**p about we are professionals and are above unionizing. Where has that gotten you so far! No, a union will not give you everything you want, but it helps.

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1,982 Posts; 33,608 Profile Views

Did any of the above nurses retain an attorney to find their termination?

If they did not, then they deserve to get fired for no reason, and let the hospital get away with it.

If physicians are terminated without just cause, they show up with their attorney in tow, and truly fight back.

This is the reason that nurses are walked all over, because the PTB, know that it is a rare nurse who will fight back.

Spare me, "lawyers cost alot of money, and I can't afford it".

If you have a good case, and the attorney will decide if you do, he/she, will take the case on contingency. If win, they get a part of your settlement, if you lose, they, and you, get nothing.

It is worth it to call a lawyer. They usually offer a free consultation, so you have nothing to lose it they don't want to take you case.

However, if you believe that you have a good case, don't stop at just consulting with one attorney. Call others, and see if they will.

JMHO and my NY $0.02

Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN, (ret)

Somewhere in the PACNW

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9 Posts; 647 Profile Views

We saw an employment attorney...it you work in an "at will employment" state there is nothing that can be done. We tried the age descrimination (which we felt was accurate) route, but how do you prove that?

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1 Post; 97 Profile Views

So very sad but so very true. I have been a nurse for 25+ years in emergency rooms and critical care units. Two years ago, I hung up my critical care unit job and moved back to the emergency room

for good. One year ago, I decided to return to school and get my NP. Once I achieve this degree, I will never work inside a hospital again‼️

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SororAKS has 12 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in ER, ICU/CCU, Open Heart OR Recovery, Etc.

1 Article; 720 Posts; 13,264 Profile Views

Collective action, proactive (not reactive or passive aggressive) behavior, using our numbers to stand together and approach management. Question things, persist until you get an answer. Organize and get a union to represent nurses with a good contract. Say no. Engage the media and publicize these issues. Most members of the public have no idea what nurses really do and why nurses are critical for a functioning healthcare system.

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AutumnApple has 12 years experience and specializes in M/S, Pulmonary, Travel, Homecare, Psych..

1 Article; 481 Posts; 9,322 Profile Views

I agree with every word.

We have known for years that our Healthcare system was too much of a business and not enough of a service. By "we" I mean those who have optimal pt outcomes first in their mind as opposed to profit.

But the powers that be continue to let the fire rage out of control because, well, there is too much profit lost if we change course now (in their eyes).

All the while, nurses were degraded and pushed away. They knew we'do be the voice of reason that proclaimed we are headed in the wrong direction. They didn't want to hear it so, they discredited us.

To undo the damage we've done will take much time and money. I imagine the solution to all of this is complex aND has layers like an onion.

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CapeCodMermaid has 30 years experience as a RN and specializes in Gerontology, Med surg, Home Health.

1 Follower; 6,071 Posts; 60,228 Profile Views

It's not just hospital nurses. Many upper management nurses in LTC and SNFs have been fired because they made too much money and didn't make the bottom line appealing. It's horrible and the end isn't in sight.

One piece of advice....don't get sick.

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8 Posts; 274 Profile Views

Administration will take a smaller hit when someone dies or is injured--they are insured for millions of dollars. But the poor nurse who was assigned to that patient will lose their license and probably their home and could go to jail for negligence. Administrators don't care, they will hang the nurses out to dry. A court will tell the nurse it was her/his fault for working under substandard conditions. It's a catch 22 if a nurse refuses an assignment for unsafe conditions they worry they will lose their job or be labeled trouble. This is why so many have left the bedside. Sad, because most of us became nurses because we really wanted to make a difference in the health of others.

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Dragonnurse1 has 9 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in ER - trauma/cardiac/burns. IV start spec.

289 Posts; 6,756 Profile Views

For our hospital the change took place when the administrators decided patients were customers and the customer is always right. Patients do not always know what they need but when administration treats them as the "always right" customer the nurses suffer. We were constantly berated because our wait times were too high (per PG scores). I was asked by my nurse manager to take charts from a months worth of ER visits and tabulate the times. I did (first and last time I agreed to do something like this) and to everyones surprise our averaged wait time was 2 hours and 45 minutes. This included patients that waited more than 24 hours for a room upstairs. Yes a hospital is a business but when you try to run it like a department store patients and staff are going to suffer greatly. I was also a patient in my own hospital more than once and I can tell you from experience with the "satisfaction surveys" that I could not answer one question by checking a box, I wrote all over my survey to find that it was thrown away because I could not pigeon hole every selection.

Edited by Dragonnurse1
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