Thinking about accepting HH job-questions

  1. Have worked in hospital critical care for a long time, last 5 years worked in skilled nursing/rehab facility, then staff develop coordinator for skilled/assisted/long term care facility. I am considering accepting a position with a local home health agency. Do you think this would be a good transition for me? I really love the patient-nurse interaction and missed that when teaching. I don't understand though the comment about do not give your phone number to the clients. When you call to make the appt to see them, if they have a cell phone they can see your number! How do you avoid this? Also what does "on call" actually mean in home health? Would you have to make a visit in the middle of the night? Do you have to take patient calls in the evening? I live in a very rural area-no way I am driving miles in the evening when it is dark. I appreciate anyones input-thank you
  2. Visit Lindah52 profile page

    About Lindah52

    Joined: Jul '14; Posts: 2

    6 Comments

  3. by   caliotter3
    You block your number on caller ID when making a phone call. Go to your phone's settings and look for the setting. If you have a problem, go to the phone store with your phone and have an employee help you. If your phone does not have this option, then use the phone company option. When you dial their number you start with *67 if I remember the code correctly. You can verify this in the info section at the front of any phone book, or by calling the operator or info number of your phone carrier. Get the agency to explain their on call policy to you. It might mean that you are required to make a night time visit, or it might mean that you call another nurse to make that visit. It does, however, mean that you take patient calls during the hours you are on call.
  4. by   Libby1987
    I don't think it would be a good transition for the following reasons..

    No recent patient care experience.
    Refusing to drive after dark.
    Already concerned about a vulnerable patient population, who will be letting an unknown person come into their home, seeing your contact number, while expecting these same people to accept a call from a blocked number.
  5. by   balistic
    You can use a phone specifically for work- turn off after hours and instruct the patient to call the agency always instead of your personal cell.

    Yes, you will have to do do visits after dark and answer call at all hours when you are on call.
  6. by   caliotter3
    When I am expecting a call related to my job, I answer the blocked number. This happened recently with a new employer when the on call nurse called me from her blocked number. All agencies should provide their on call nurses with the agency "phone" or "call forwarding" number when the nurse takes call. There is no reason to be forced to reveal your personal number to anyone.
  7. by   Have Nurse
    Quote from Libby1987
    I don't think it would be a good transition for the following reasons..

    No recent patient care experience.
    Refusing to drive after dark.
    Already concerned about a vulnerable patient population, who will be letting an unknown person come into their home, seeing your contact number, while expecting these same people to accept a call from a blocked number.
    I don't know. I would say she has some good questions and just needs some information. She is a seasoned nurse. That's the best kind of nurse to have in Home Health. She won't have machines to bail her out but she has enough critical care and skilled nursing in her facilities to merit being able to handle difficult situations. Have you read her post carefully? As far as wondering about the cell phone situation, many companies offer a cell of their own for nurses to use so that if the client needs to phone the nurse, they phone the answering service after hours, just like they would if they called the doc in the middle of the night, or during the day.

    Being On Call is just like it is in what she is already use to, but the hours and days are specific to the agency involved. I think she'd do just fine. They'd be lucky to have her.
  8. by   Libby1987
    Quote from Have Nurse
    I don't know. I would say she has some good questions and just needs some information. She is a seasoned nurse. That's the best kind of nurse to have in Home Health. She won't have machines to bail her out but she has enough critical care and skilled nursing in her facilities to merit being able to handle difficult situations. Have you read her post carefully? As far as wondering about the cell phone situation, many companies offer a cell of their own for nurses to use so that if the client needs to phone the nurse, they phone the answering service after hours, just like they would if they called the doc in the middle of the night, or during the day.

    Being On Call is just like it is in what she is already use to, but the hours and days are specific to the agency involved. I think she'd do just fine. They'd be lucky to have her.
    I'm glad you asked if I read OP's post because I re-read and now see that I mis-read the phone issue.

    Agencies should provide work phones and those work numbers should not be blocked, my personal opinion.

    I still believe not a good transition, many posters here are unhappy with home health. I've been very happy and successful in home health for many years, I think success comes most when someone is determined to learn the ropes holding off on deciding what they will and will not do until after they better understand the industry and how to navigate in it as well has the ability to dedicate a year of some long days to get there.

    If OP proves me wrong I would be very happy to hear.

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