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Hiring Staff? When Did That Become My Job?

Nurses   (2,579 Views 23 Comments)
by tencat tencat (Member)

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Hi all. I just need a bit of advice. I am a case manager, and recently I got a new supervisor. I've been asked before to meet potential candidates, but never have been asked to actually set up interviews and interview candidates. My new supervisor told me to get a hold of a potential candidate and interview him for a position we have in our office. Ummm.........I don't mind doing this, but I don't think it's my job, if that makes sense. And if it is now going to be my job, I feel that I should have some kind of title, even if it's 'Head Peon' with no real power. So my question is: Should I ask my supervisor for a 'title', because I do want to get management experience? Or should I be very polite and say, "I don't think I should be interviewing and hiring people because it's not in my job description." Not to mention I have NO time to take on extra duties. Advice is always appreciated~

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3,143 Visitors; 230 Posts

You want a title because your supervisor asked you to do one thing? And you're considering actually telling them "No, it's not part of my job?" It's not like they're asking you to go clean up poop three times a week. Just do it. Besides, you said you're a "manager", that requires you to do other work as deemed necessary by your supervisor as long as it is not so far outside the realm of your work. As a manager in an office, it is certainly feasible that you could be involved in interviewing and hiring people. And this sounds like something that might come up once in a while. You're not going to be hiring people on a weekly or monthly basis, right? I wouldn't ask for a title.

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dthfytr has 30 years experience as a ADN, LPN, RN, EMT-B, EMT-I and specializes in ER, Trauma.

12,253 Visitors; 1,159 Posts

My first thought would be to discuss with your new supervisor what your duties were before he/she arrived. A previous written job description would be helpful if it exists.

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3,009 Visitors; 219 Posts

What position is the candidate interviewing for?

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grandmawrinkle specializes in adult ICU.

6,882 Visitors; 272 Posts

Besides, you said you're a "manager", that requires you to do other work as deemed necessary by your supervisor as long as it is not so far outside the realm of your work. As a manager in an office, it is certainly feasible that you could be involved in interviewing and hiring people.

I don't think you get it. A case manager is not an office manager, staff/personnel manager, etc. A case manager manages patient cases and doesn't have anything to do with hiring/firing staff, etc. I do not think that interviewing and hiring candidates is within the job description of most case managers.

I would not do this if I wasn't trained or experienced and it wasn't part of my job. I have been asked to sit in on panel interviews before and give my two cents but that is as far as I would take it in the OP's situation as the OP is staff as well, if I am understanding correctly. I actually do think this is a job for your boss. Is there some reason why she wants you to do it? Is she out of the office that day or otherwise unavailable?

I would be worried that if I selected someone and it ended up not working out, it would come back to bite me in the a$$. You could potentially get blamed for a whole ton of stuff if anything goes wrong. Just think about that and what you want to take responsibility for.

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roser13 has 17 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

50,639 Visitors; 6,504 Posts

"Besides, you said you're a "manager",

Morphed, I'm guessing you're not in the field of nursing? A case manager position is really not the same as the word manager is used in other contexts.

OP, while I can understand your reluctance to take on more work/responsibility without compensation or recognition, the bigger question is: how can the supervisor expect you to adequately interview applicants if you are not involved in any global sense with the company? Or at least your department.

Anyone who is interviewing candidates for a position should be involved in the management and decision-making process or else they have no way of thoroughly evaluating the interviewees. If you can't see the big picture, you would be incapable of making intelligent hiring choices.

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"Besides, you said you're a "manager",

Morphed, I'm guessing you're not in the field of nursing? A case manager position is really not the same as the word manager is used in other contexts.

OP, while I can understand your reluctance to take on more work/responsibility without compensation or recognition, the bigger question is: how can the supervisor expect you to adequately interview applicants if you are not involved in any global sense with the company? Or at least your department.

Anyone who is interviewing candidates for a position should be involved in the management and decision-making process or else they have no way of thoroughly evaluating the interviewees. If you can't see the big picture, you would be incapable of making intelligent hiring choices.

You'd be guessing wrong then.

I know that a case manager is not the same thing as a manager in a retail store or something, but I think if she has the title of "manager" (and yes, I know she's more managing "cases", not people), she should still be involved in other aspects of things run in her department/office. I agree with your second and third paragraphs.

Also, many staff RNs are involved in hiring and they are not compensated/titled for it (other than getting their hourly pay). They might not be actually calling the person up and scheduling an interview, but they do many times have interviews with applicants either alone or with other staff members.

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3,143 Visitors; 230 Posts

I don't think you get it. A case manager is not an office manager, staff/personnel manager, etc. A case manager manages patient cases and doesn't have anything to do with hiring/firing staff, etc. I do not think that interviewing and hiring candidates is within the job description of most case managers.

I would not do this if I wasn't trained or experienced and it wasn't part of my job. I have been asked to sit in on panel interviews before and give my two cents but that is as far as I would take it in the OP's situation as the OP is staff as well, if I am understanding correctly. I actually do think this is a job for your boss. Is there some reason why she wants you to do it? Is she out of the office that day or otherwise unavailable?

I would be worried that if I selected someone and it ended up not working out, it would come back to bite me in the a$$. You could potentially get blamed for a whole ton of stuff if anything goes wrong. Just think about that and what you want to take responsibility for.

I do get it. I think roser13 put it pretty well, and seeing as you gave her a "kudos", I think you agree with her. And what I was saying, she basically said. I think my second comment might clarify a bit too.

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8,575 Visitors; 1,008 Posts

I know that a case manager is not the same thing as a manager in a retail store or something, but I think if she has the title of "manager" (and yes, I know she's more managing "cases", not people), she should still be involved in other aspects of things run in her department/office.

A nurse case manager has nothing to do with running departments or managing other staff members. They "manage" patients and their discharge needs.

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dudette10 has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN.

1 Article; 25,715 Visitors; 3,528 Posts

In my previous line of work, I was asked to be the screener for new applicants for a position similar to mine. I was not a manager at the time. I took my selection as a screener as a compliment to my abilities. I did it, and I was actually pretty good at it because the people I picked were eventually hired and turned out to be "stars" on the unit.

When it came time for my reviews, I used my results as bargaining power for raises and promotions. Guess what? I eventually did get a promotion to manager. If you would like to be a supervisor one day, you can also use your experience in screening applicants as evidence that you would be a good supervisor.

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1,703 Visitors; 41 Posts

yeah, it does sound like you're getting suckered into the position... take it as a compliment, your manager sees you as competent enough to handlethis responsibility, and as someone said, you can use it inthe futurefor your next yearly eval to get a raise, and it is definitely a resume builder.

i'd do it :)

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P_RN has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ORTHOPAEDICS-CERTIFIED SINCE 89.

33,078 Visitors; 6,011 Posts

I let myself get suckered into this ONE time. A very nice young lady applied for unit secretary. I asked for references, she had good ones, I asked education etc. and wrote out a report for the Nurse Manager. Four years later I got a write up from said manager because when the girls NCLEX-P application bounced for shoplifting a 6 oz Orange Juice when she was 12.....now how was I to even get that info? Anyway it turned out she'd had her hands full at the quicky mart and the OJ was in her pocket. The cashier stopped her at the door and she paid for it. It was erased from her juvenile record according to the sheriff. But *I* got the write-up. I refused to sign it and took it to the director where it got dropped.

My advice would be to say you will interview and write a report for the boss to make the decision, after all it IS her job not yours.

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