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Highly Sensitive People in Nursing: Stress & Burnout - Research

Nurses Article   (2,542 Views 22 Replies 921 Words)
by RNliveoak RNliveoak (Member)

RNliveoak has 10 years experience .

3 Articles; 883 Visitors; 18 Posts

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Highly Sensitive People make up roughly 20% of any given population. Given this group is more sensitive to internal and external stimuli, those that are highly sensitive might consider how this could affect their work as a nurse. My study aims to offer some insight into this question. You are reading page 2 of Highly Sensitive People in Nursing: Stress & Burnout - Research. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Luchador has 5 years experience as a CNA, EMT-B.

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Hi 37changes, thanks for writing. What a timely thing to do before you decide where to work! You should get great information out of that (by E. Aron)! There are great things about being highly sensitive too, I just couldn't include both in my study. Maybe one day. Congratulations on graduating, and good luck.

I didn't take the survey because I'm an student RN at this point. But I have a question- how do you know if you are a "highly sensitive person?" I suspect I am and nursing probably draws quite a few empathetic types.

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I didn't take the survey because I'm an student RN at this point. But I have a question- how do you know if you are a "highly sensitive person?" I suspect I am and nursing probably draws quite a few empathetic types.

If you go to the Amazon page for the HSP book by Anon, there is a list right there on the product page, from the book.

I'm reading it now & having to tear myself away from it to do, you know, the Thanksgiving things! ;)

OP, I want to thank you again for this thread. Yes, I see myself in some of this ... but OH do I see my middle son (14). Reading this book is going to be super helpful in understanding him.

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RNliveoak has 10 years experience.

3 Articles; 883 Visitors; 18 Posts

HI Luchador, there is also a self-test at hsperson.com, if you are interested. Thank you for your reply.

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umbdude has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a RN. PMHNP student.

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I am not sure why a highly sensitive person would consider nursing????

^^ This is exactly why I think this survey is a terrible idea. It's another way of justifying the flawed thinking that "sensitive people shouldn't work in nursing."

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HomeBound has 20 years experience.

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I participated.

I dearly hope, though, that some day we will turn our attention more to the environment and its specific factors, rather than continually and incessantly focusing on nurses and our coping or purported lack thereof. Exceedingly few people thrive in the type of environments that many healthcare environments have become for staff nurses in recent years. Thousands+ of nurses are not "burned out" (if so, the concept itself should be more closely examined/questioned, IMO) and our frequent discussion about burnout have not led to positive changes in the environment.

Signed,

Debbie D. ;)

Much better said than I was formulating.

This survey slides by me as a backdoor like the study that was put out over the BSN vs. ADN trained nurse...and creates to this day such heated controversy...and the credentials have ZIP to do with being a good, solid, conscientious Nurse.

I can forsee this possibly being used as a tool to circumvent changes that DESPERATELY need to be made in every unit. Respect for each other, civility, Managers stepping in and nipping bullying in the bud. Administrators already ignore the stress behavior prevalent in Nursing and simply remove themselves from being made accountable.

Everyone wants a reason for why things happen. Nurses are stressed to the breaking point not because they are just wilting flowers and can't deal with life. The situations we are placed in with understaffing, lack of sleep, unreasonable demands, lack of resources, no voice to change things, no ability to unionize without extreme fear of losing jobs or reputation....the list goes on.

We already have enough victim blaming and shaming not just in nursing but in general society. This thesis rubs me that someone wants an "out". "It's not the department, lack of leadership, uncivil and bullying colleagues, real harassment, overwork and understaff.....YOU ARE JUST ONE OF THOSE OVERSENSITIVE PEOPLE and nursing just isn't for you." Typical victim shaming tactic.

I wish you luck. I am not participating though. I am proud of the fact that I am sensitive to not only my patients' thoughts and feelings, not just their symptoms...and to my colleagues, whether they deserve my concern or not.

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Crystal-Wings has 4 years experience as a LVN.

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I'm on the autism spectrum, so I would consider myself "sensitive". I don't like bright lights, loud noises, or being around a ton of people for long periods of time. I'm also not very good at multitasking (i.e. floor nursing). I'm better working 1 on 1 with patients rather than working with several at a time, which is why I do private duty nursing.

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RNliveoak has 10 years experience.

3 Articles; 883 Visitors; 18 Posts

Thank you for your post.

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RNliveoak has 10 years experience.

3 Articles; 883 Visitors; 18 Posts

Thanks for sharing.

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RNliveoak has 10 years experience.

3 Articles; 883 Visitors; 18 Posts

Hi Crystal-Wings, thanks for sharing.

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Really I feel like highly sensitive people tend to gravitate towards nursing. I am more worried about nurses who emotionally clock out with patients. People with disabilities are often in very powerless positions such as needing assistance with very basic needs. I have witnessed uncaring nurses treat these patients like a burden or as if the patients needs exist to make your life more difficult or the patient is requesting something just to give you a hard time. This isn't fair. On the contrary I think sensitive nurses are able to step into other people's shoes and have insight and perspective into what the experience of hospitalization can do to someone. I think the problem is with the burden of unrealistic workloads and expectations of nurses, not the sensitive nurse. To say highly sensitve people don't belong in nursing eems kind of victim blaming to me. Like the fault lies on the nurse and not the workplace circumstances they are forced to work in.

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Not an RN yet so I didn't take your survey but I'm interested in reading your thesis. I'm a highly sensitive person, noises especially. Certain tone, pitch, or volume make me cringe and have this feeling I can't describe.

However I'm applying to nursing schools for Fall 2019.

I intend on doing patient care for a short time while earning my MSN and moving on to be a Nurse Educator :)

im just hoping now I make it through a few years!

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