I hate being a nurse - page 3

Hey all. I'm really struggling here and need some advice. I am a new nurse at my first nursing job. I graduated May 2017. I just got out of the residency program at my hospital just last week. The... Read More

  1. by   DSMRN
    I know what you are saying, except that I have been a nurse for going on 12 years now, and have probably hated my career choice for a good 10 of them. I feel absolutely stuck in this damn field, and would give anything to go back and never pick nursing as a career.
  2. by   Kmc12
    Thanks for everyone's comments, advice, and help! Just wanted to come on here with an update. I started having really bad anxiety before work, bad enough that I decided to get on a low dose of meds in hopes of that helping (anxiety runs in the family as well, so it was probably only a matter of time ). I guess I had too high of hopes. I still get bad anxiety with work, still cry before each shift (it is a bit better though), and I still HATE being a nurse. I just want to quit so badly. I'm going to stick it out a year and see if I can find something better. It just sucks to think that I'd be happier not being a nurse, but I'll also be paying student loans for years on a degree I won't use. I have no clue what to do.
  3. by   CHnurse79
    Hey, I know it probably is small consolation but I am exactly in the same position as you. Been a nurse about 1 1/2 years, started in ICU and just started a new job. It sucks. I am giving it a couple more years and hopefully during that time will be able to formulate plan B. Nursing school is grossly inadequate in preparing you for the realities of the career. So far it has aged me, been detrimental to my physical, mental and emotional health and I honestly feel like I have PTSD from my first year. I feel your pain Keep me posted on your career!
  4. by   crydergirl
    I would love to be a positive voice because I loved being a nurse. Have been doing this for 15 years licensed for 20. I have had 8 jobs each one steadily growing worse than the first. The management treats you horribly so I went into management but you still get treated horribly but just work harder. The pay is good but the treatment is not worth it. Then the patients. They were totally different 20 years ago. Now it's all baby boomers and drug addicts. They treat you like a slave and then expect you to worship them. I bought my own assisted living home thinking it would be different because I could provide great care. It's nothing different still treated badly and now I don't even get paid. Leaving nursing asap. Rather dig ditches
  5. by   Renell
    I graduated in May 2017, too. Night shift on a stepdown unit at a big urban hospital. And I cannot tell you how often I just wanted to quit, and move to another job. I still do, but I'm trying to hold on till I get my year in. Plus, I really like my coworkers on nights (and a few people on days). I'm imaging you are getting close to your one year like me. If you feel like you can hang in there, do so. If not, don't put your mental health at stake. I have had quite a few breakdowns myself before and during work. Nursing can be rewarding, but daunting as well. =(
  6. by   Kimmity
    Hi OP!
    It's crazy how many of us new grads are experiencing what you are right now. I graduated in May 2017 just like you and didn't start working until October 2017. I came off of orientation in December. I work nights on a busy Med-Surg floor handling about 5-8 patients, we rarely get 8 though. The first 3 months I felt really anxious before going to work. I would cry while driving to work and sometimes would have to have a quick breakdown in the bathroom before I faced the chaos again. I would lose sleep, feel nauseated, dread going to work, and feel really overwhelmed. During this, I would read the other member's post and found that a lot of new RN's went through similar situations. I have to admit, it did get a lot better for me but I'm starting to feel overwhelmed again. Granted our staffing is terrible with no tech and caring for 7 high acuity patients. I question if nursing was the right choice for me and I have made a few small mistakes such as not labeling tubing or making sure the consent was brought up from ER. I worry constantly if I'm going to make a huge mistake. My co-workers are great and with my recent evaluation it seems like I am on the right track, but it doesn't really help with the anxiety. Basically, what I'm trying to tell you is, is that it really does get better. We all have good days and bad days, we just need to keep trucking along! However, if the unit is not a good fit, it doesn't hurt to find your calling elsewhere whether it be on a new unit or a different employer. I learned so much in the past 6 months and I definitely have gotten better skill wise. It's really different after you're off orientation and that's when the challenge begins. I really do hope that you stick with nursing and don't let this rut discourage you! Best of luck and good wishes to you!
  7. by   Kimmity
    Hi Kmc12!

    I just saw your update after I had posted my comment to your original post.
    I'm really sorry to hear that your anxiety and feelings towards nursing has worsened. Do you have other new grad friends that you can vent too? Sometimes a good long talk with someone who knows what I'm going through helps to give me some hope. If you truly think that your unit is not where you're supposed to be, I would suggest in finding another unit or employer to work for. I recently had a coworker quit and change floors. She is much happier where she is now. Even if you don't stick it out a year, 6 months would be good too. I didn't really get the flow of my unit around 3 months after I got out of orientation and though I am still anxious, it has gotten a lot better.

    This career is draining mentally and physically, but I truly hope that you get to experience the positives in nursing too!
  8. by   BlinkyPinky
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    I would also advise you to 'leave work at work'. And by that I mean, when you get in your car to go home, say- out loud- "I am leaving work here. I am now going home and am not going to entertain thoughts of work until I walk through the hospital doors again". Repeat as often as necessary. It really does help.
    *************
    Yes-this. What I would do is a little ritual , not unlike a bedtime ritual where your body now knows " gonna be sleep time now "
    After my last task of the evening , which at our place was signing out & turning in keys-- I took off name badge ( glove box of car not hanging from mirror ); then I turned off the B S work cell ph one we all were issued. Into my work bag , in an Off state. Then, Drive away !
    I know peop!e who would remain in their regular clothes until ARRIVING at work, THEN change into work attire. Reverse procedure for the drive home.
    It is all about = " erasing" the nurse JOB ( and that's what it is - a Job),and returning to the Real You.
  9. by   nubiabena
    First and foremost, don't feel bad about feeling bad. I've been a nurse for 4 years and I remember feeling exactly the same for about 1.5 to 2 years after graduating. I'm not going to lie, it is very difficult to be present physically, mentally and emotionally at work while going through this. It does not mean you're in the wrong field or that you're not good. If you feel unsure, then review material, don't just worry because worrying won't get anything done. Secondly, you MUST vent to someone. The more you hold on to this the harder it will be. This feeling will go away and things will get easier to bear, not because they're easy but because you will feel confident enough to handle things. So, I recommend reviewing material and going over things to ease your anxiety. Also, do something on your days off that you enjoy, like writing and painting (I like doing that). What I used to do was print positive statements and put them on my night stand, that way I can see positive statements before closing my eyes at bedtime and also be the first thing I see when I open them. I was never one to pray, but I learned to once I got into this profession, I prayed before every shift and also before bed. It takes a lot for some of us to be able to be okay; we have to find different methods to calm that anxiety and switch the negativity to positivity, but do it anyway. What ever it takes, do it. Because I can assure you, this profession is worth all of the difficulties and stresses that come along. You will see it in your patient's faces and all the people that you touch. Don't give up.
  10. by   jive turkey
    Quote from Kmc12
    Thanks for everyone's comments, advice, and help! Just wanted to come on here with an update. I started having really bad anxiety before work, bad enough that I decided to get on a low dose of meds in hopes of that helping (anxiety runs in the family as well, so it was probably only a matter of time ������). I guess I had too high of hopes. I still get bad anxiety with work, still cry before each shift (it is a bit better though), and I still HATE being a nurse. I just want to quit so badly. I'm going to stick it out a year and see if I can find something better. It just sucks to think that I'd be happier not being a nurse, but I'll also be paying student loans for years on a degree I won't use. I have no clue what to do.
    While it is not unheard of for new graduates to start on high acuity units like a neuro, stroke, cardiac, ICU, or ED unit it certainly isn't for everyone. Those units are great for people who like high acuity, fast paced high stress action packed environments.

    This does not sound like you. There is nothing wrong with that. People make the mistake of thinking you must work in the hospital to be a "real nurse". No you don't.

    If this job stresses you out to the point you're crying before each shift, this is not healthy. You should not subject yourself to it. You have such a large variety of practices to apply your nursing skills to. I understand you want to keep your resume spotless. I recommend seeing if you can't transfer to another position with the same facility such as case management, an outpatient unit, pre-op/pacu, endoscopy...something were your patients aren't so close to the brink of serious injury and death like they are in a stroke unit.
  11. by   Nurse2515
    Unfortunately I qualified in December last year and feel exactly the same. Already in my second job as thought it was the place that was the problem. Only to now realise its me as not sure I want be a nurse. I just don't feel like its worth the stress and worry not only when your there but when on days off too. Has it got any better since posting?
  12. by   Kmc12
    Thanks for the reply! It hasn't really gotten much better. Especially when I have a few days off and then have to go back, I get so upset and just cry. I have accepted a position on a different unit at a different hospital in hopes that this will change how I feel. But I'm convinced that nursing wasn't the right path for me
  13. by   Nurse2515
    I suppose when you start your new post at least no one can say you didn't try to make it work. See how it goes on this new job. I went to occupational health the other day for some bloods and she asked how it was going so I was honest with them and told them how low I felt working as a nurse. She gave me a leaflet and number I can use when I feel I need to speak to someone. Maybe contact your occupational health and see if there is any help they can offer you. xx

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