Help! Manager is making schedule a nightmare

  1. I have been a nurse for a little over 8 years and in that time have worked a variety of shifts, but worked overnights for about 4 years. My schedule was always 2-3 nights on, 1 night off, 2-3 nights on, 2-3 nights off and so on. I started a new job at a detox facility in July per diem until something full time opened up. I told my manager I wanted days but would be willing to work nights until a day shift opened up. She said a day shift would be opening up full time in November. In the meantime I worked day and night shifts filling in until I was offered a full time position. Now, my manager has only been the manager for a few months and she is trying to transition everyone to 12 hour shifts. Most nurses are 12 hours but one part time nurse will not
    give up her 8 hour shifts. So beginning of this month my manager puts the schedule out and I see that I have a full time schedule (never spoke with her about this but whatever). It is a mix of 12 hour shifts, 7p-7a, 11p-7a and one 3-11 shift. It is also EVERY OTHER NIGHT. I had a fit when I saw the schedule because it is difficult enough as it is working overnights for me but to be scheduled every other night leaves no time for a life. Sent her multiple emails and she finally speaks with me and shows me a schedule with 12 hour shifts, every other weekend, pending two other nurses agreeing. A new schedule comes out yesterday- not at all what she had showed me. Still do not have nights in a row and it is mostly 11p-7a (because she just hired someone for a non existing 3-11 position) with one 7-7 shift. I am so frustrated with this and I really do like my job but can't deal with this schedule, especially when she had showed me a completely different schedule. What to do? So many other nurses are fed up with their schedules as well and have been going to HR about it because she is no help.
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    About khlpn89

    Joined: Apr '18; Posts: 7; Likes: 4
    from CT , US

    9 Comments

  3. by   JKL33
    The easy angle I can see is to inform your manager you've decided to stick with your per diem status. I assume they haven't had you sign a FT position, from what it sounds.

    You could try to talk to her about increasing staff input into schedules/self-scheduling, etc.

    You could collectively approach her professionally regarding your concerns...

    You could ask to have a meeting where the concerns of the group can be respectfully discussed

    You could try to come up with an alternative schedule for her to look at/see if it might be acceptable

    Or you could resign (but again, why do that when you could just stay per diem?)

    Best of luck -
  4. by   Kallie3006
    Every per diem job I have had I have had to sign papers in relation to the pay and time "commitment" I am agreeing to. For instance to maintain per diem I must schedule at least 6 shifts in an 8 week scheduling period. When I do a contract for the same company, I am again presented a contract listing the start and end date as well as the shift commitment and pay. Did you sign anything stating the change in your per diem status to full time? If not I would bring this to the managers attention. Her changing the hours and commitment on you may be a breach of contract and could possibly hold some weight as far as scheduling goes. Most states are at will, however, and there may not be any recourse available to you other than working what has been scheduled. You may need to evaluate how much you want to remain at this job. I work nights and completely understand the every other night schedule being absolutely horrid when you have other responsibilities aside from work. Hope you can get this figured out
  5. by   tamilynn
    A face to face discussion with your manager to talk about the concerns and options and your needs and expectations moving forward. Most important is to point out how she mislead you and that you would appreciate the discussion if something changes from your verbal conversation. If she has no intention to work with you then your action to remain per diem and look else where is always an option. Remember work and life balance matters to remain a great nurse . Jobs should not be taking quality of life from you . We are all replaceable and we also can find jobs that meet our needs .
  6. by   Southpawdown
    I'm sorry for what you are dealing with but am so glad you posted this as something VERY similar is happening to me though my position doesn't start until next week. I agreed to a PRN day shift at a hospital until a FT or PT position opened up, which during the interview I was told would be around the first of Jan, Feb at the latest as another nurse is leaving due to pregnancy. I made it clear when interviewing I could only work days. There was no issue as the Director stated she had someone for nights as well as someone who wanted to "flip" between days and nights. I find out Friday I am listed as "variable" PRN and inquired about what that meant. You guessed it, that I will be available for ANY hours needed. I will be scheduled to work a certain date but it could be nights one date and days another. I contacted the Director who said her "needs for the unit had changed in the past few days", etc ,etc. Like you, the agreement hasn't turned out to be at all what was discussed. I have another job so I do not have to move forward with this one. I was wanting to get back into the hospital setting and not work M-F anymore but now, I don't trust the new employer or at least not the Director. Like you, had I not received a copy of the upcoming schedule, I would have had no idea the agreement had changed. Interestingly, the final offer letter on Friday was so general that that is the reason I asked about any of it since there was no specification of day shift, agreed number of shifts a month etc. I thought maybe this was an isolated incident or just this employer but now, reading what you are dealing with, I guess not. I don't understand how employers expect a certain level of trust/professionalism/professional courtesy but don't think to extend that to the employee.
  7. by   JKL33
    Quote from Southpawdown
    I'm sorry for what you are dealing with but am so glad you posted this as something VERY similar is happening to me though my position doesn't start until next week. I agreed to a PRN day shift at a hospital until a FT or PT position opened up, which during the interview I was told would be around the first of Jan, Feb at the latest as another nurse is leaving due to pregnancy. I made it clear when interviewing I could only work days. There was no issue as the Director stated she had someone for nights as well as someone who wanted to "flip" between days and nights. I find out Friday I am listed as "variable" PRN and inquired about what that meant. You guessed it, that I will be available for ANY hours needed. I will be scheduled to work a certain date but it could be nights one date and days another.
    I think you should seek clarification about this.

    Was the original posting for PRN days/day shift? Meaning, did it say that specifically? A lot of PRN positions are hired as being "variable" days and shifts on the paperwork.

    It's possible nothing has really changed in your scenario - you had a discussion about only being available for days and you'll be allowed to only pick up day shifts, but the paperwork is going to say "variable" even though it is agreed and acknowledged that the nurse only has a certain type of availability.

    When you give them your availability (tell them which days you are available to work PRN shifts), you will simply write it as "Available from 7a-7p on the following days: [list dates]. They don't put you on the schedule whenever they want, that's not what PRN is. Either you sign up for specific shifts or they put you on the schedule as they wish according to the availability you have given them.

    You're only in trouble here if they have a lot of requirements to satisfy the PRN position - such as must work ___# shifts per pay period, ____# weekend shifts per pay period, ____holidays, blah, blah, blah, and especially if it says that you must give a certain amount of availability for all shifts - in which case you would say thanks but no thanks.
  8. by   Southpawdown
    I did ask.The posting was for day shift and the agreement was for a minimum of 9 shifts/month commitment. I would have to sign up for shifts that were open after the FT nurses selected their days so I may not always get the exact dates I wanted to work but that was ok since I'm planned on being flexible.
    It's when the offer letter arrived and was so generic that I started asking questions. I've worked PRN before and the offer letter always spelled out the specifics. The letter was also missing the shift diff amounts. That's when I was informed the needs of the unit had changed since my interview, nights was more in need and I would be listed as "variable" so if I signed up for a day shift, wasn't needed but nights needed someone then I would "flip" to nights for that shift.
    After talking to the Director again this past week she is not able/willing to provide what she initially stated in the interview she could and I am not able/willing to work nights so I passed on the offer.
  9. by   JKL33
    Quote from Southpawdown
    That's when I was informed the needs of the unit had changed since my interview, nights was more in need and I would be listed as "variable" so if I signed up for a day shift, wasn't needed but nights needed someone then I would "flip" to nights for that shift.
    Wow, that's ridiculous. I'm guessing that is only one of many difficulties that you would have experienced had you taken that position.

    Sounds like a good call on your part. Hope you find something else.
  10. by   motor_mouth
    I really think management has NO CLUE how difficult it is for night shift to work every other day. We do "self" scheduling but every now and then, the manager schedules us with no input from staff, and it seems we ALL end up every other night. We'll try to switch with each other if possible. But yes, every other night for night shift should never be given unless the staff wants it, and we do have someone who prefers that.
  11. by   nurse2033
    I learned the hard way that if you have work limitations like certain days or times you should get it in writing from your manager when they hire you. Often their promises are forgotten, not sincere, or not communicated. In any case a good conversation starter would be; I really enjoy working here but the schedule is not what I expected. I don't think I will be able to make this work. I don't want to leave but I just want to let you know I have started looking at other opportunities. This is their chance to take you seriously and maybe ask you what would work. If the boss isn't willing to work with you, you are better off leaving anyway. Good luck.

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