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Have you ever een a CNA FLOATER?

CNA/MA   (12,141 Views 11 Comments)
by sentiboi sentiboi (Member)

1,362 Visitors; 19 Posts

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hello guys!!!

i just just got hired as a cna floater.. this is going to be my first job as a cna since i graduated last year.. i have ZERO idea how it is to work as a cna floater! and it does REALLY REALLY makes me NERVOUS!!!:confused:.. what is going to be my role as a cna floater? what are the duties and responsibilties?what makes it different from an ordinary cna? what can i expect?is it hard ( some people are telling me)?

how was your experienceas a floater

how did you adjust to it ?

How does it really work?

pls enlighten me and tell me EVERYTHING about it coZ they are telling me its hard...

Edited by sentiboi

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fuzzywuzzy has 3 years experience and works as a CNA.

16,867 Visitors; 1,816 Posts

Well that's not very specific. Are you working in a hospital or nursing home? In my nursing home we don't use that term, but we do have people that know all the halls and people that only work one or 2 halls. And a lot of time (mostly second shift) they'll have someone work 4 hours on one hall and then 4 hours on another. If that's what you mean, it's really not that different from having a regular assignment. I actually liked it a lot because I felt like I had more autonomy, I guess. I got to decide what I was going to do and who needed the most help.

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allisonhillary has 2 years experience and works as a CVICU RN.

1,571 Visitors; 49 Posts

I've been a floater in a LTC SNF, and I got floated allllllll over the place. Basically you cover the 'regulars' runs on their days off. We have 2 nurses stations and some floaters will only float within one station's halls, other (like me) had to float between both. It's a little difficult being a floater in a nursing home because so many residents have very specific routines, etc. that you have to memorize. It can also be kinda nice because you don't do the same thing eeeeeeveryday like the regulars do.

I don't know what it would be like in a hospital. I think hospital floaters get floated around to different specialty units.

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5,331 Visitors; 621 Posts

the floater term i know of basically means you're going to help others as needed, but more likely will be filling in for someone that doesn't show for work.

pretty neat you took a job and don't know exactly what it is, haha.

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NP Sam works as a Peds NP in ENT.

9,139 Visitors; 476 Posts

Like everyone else said... you are doing exactly what the name says, "floating." You do not have a permanent hall to work, you go where are needed. I love being a float. I was hired as a PRN float in July and have been floating since. I enjoy the change of faces(both patients and coworkers). The only bad thing is that sometimes the full-time people give you no choice of sections or the might give you the WORST section. Another bad thing is sometimes they may move to a different hall in the middle of the shift.

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1,362 Visitors; 19 Posts

I've been a floater in a LTC SNF, and I got floated allllllll over the place. Basically you cover the 'regulars' runs on their days off. We have 2 nurses stations and some floaters will only float within one station's halls, other (like me) had to float between both. It's a little difficult being a floater in a nursing home because so many residents have very specific routines, etc. that you have to memorize. It can also be kinda nice because you don't do the same thing eeeeeeveryday like the regulars do.

I don't know what it would be like in a hospital. I think hospital floaters get floated around to different specialty units.

thak you.. i wonder, whom do you actually get your instructions from? e.g what floor assigned to you, which residents should you assist etc... is it the charge nurse or somebody else and do you still do the charting to a specific resident if no resident is assigned to you specifically?

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NamasteNurse has 8 years experience and works as a admin.

4 Articles; 9,455 Visitors; 680 Posts

I float because I am per diem in a nursing home. I get my instructions from the charge nurse, but also from the 'regulars' on the shift. Being a floater requires you to be pleasant and accommodating. You will often get the "worst" (hardest) hall and/or assignments. Sometimes I get assigned to do all the showers instead. We all help each other anyway, so it doesn't really matter, as far as charting we all help each other as well, but mainly do the one book for 'our' assignment. You have to get along with lots of different people. If you don't click with someone it's not so bad because chances are tomorrow you will move. Also, at my facility you get paid more and only have to do one weekend every 90 days! A huge bonus IMO.

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1,083 Visitors; 14 Posts

If youre going to be working at a hospital, it is really bad at first being a floater. Every unit is different in almost every way imaginable. I would prefer to orient with someone at least once of each unit. After you see how each unit does things, memorize all the codes to every supply, linen, and break room, then it is actually a great thing to be in the float pool because of alot of the reasons mentioned above.

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1,409 Visitors; 16 Posts

At the ltc facility I am at, a float is someone who knows all halls, and will help to cover halls that are having a "bad" night, or cover a call-off if that happens. I think it is probably more difficult in the beginning, because you will have a lot of different things to learn, but I do think that it will help break up the monotony once you get settled in. Good luck!

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inpatientlywaiting has 9 years experience and works as a CNA.

2,297 Visitors; 85 Posts

I'm a floater at a Childrens hospital. By far the best thing you can ever do if your trying to get into nursing school. :yeah: I go to PICU, NICU, Med Surg, Surgical Short Stay, ED, Hem/Onc, and epilepsy. I know what I want to do, I know I can do it all (we get adult sized kids, I dont know about geriatrics). I know all the nursing staff in the hospital, know my resorses, and best of all, when there is drama, I'm not involved.:p It's also made me a better CNA, very well rounded, and I think I have a better chance on getting in to the RN program.:up: Plus as far as school goes, my schedule is much more flexible them the CNA's on the floors.

However, if your looking for long term, it can get old. I've been doing this for 7 years, and would love to know where I'm going everyday, who I'll be working with, and be familiar with my patients. I have been offered positions, and really want to take them, but they cant offer me the flexability float team can. I will not do it as a nurse though. Good luck!!!

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2,805 Visitors; 29 Posts

I was a float as a CNA at a hospital, and I really liked it. It was great for me because I was going to start nursing school soon, so it was a wonderful way to get a lot of different experience. The only bad part about it for me was that it took longer for me to feel like I knew what I was doing b/c every floor did things a little differently. So, if I didn't go back to a certain floor for a while, I would forget how they did things. But I was able to make friends with nurses/aides on every floor and it was good to see different ways of doing things. Also, I don't know if this is how it would work for you, but I was able to set my own schedule since as a floater it wasn't like a certain rotation was counting on me to be there. I just got sent to whatever floor needed extra staff. And, as a float, people are always glad to see you because you are saving the day by providing the help they need. So, for me it was a great experience. I hope it works out well for you, too!

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