Has anyone ever failed to meet the expectations for 2 jobs?

Posted
by SilverBells SilverBells, BSN Member Nurse

Specializes in Rehab/Nurse Manager. Has 7 years experience.

So, in addition to my current job, I also have a supplemental/PRN job.  Because I've been so busy with my manager position and recently finishing up my Master's degree, it's been awhile since I've picked up at my PRN job.  This week, I was called in as there are a lot of CEUs that I'm not compliant with.  I think they are also hoping that I'll pick up more shifts, which is understandable.  I've picked up a couple this week and next, but once my two weeks of PTO is done at my primary job, I really can't see myself having much--if any--time to pick up at my 2nd job.  

Has anyone else ever struggled to balance/meet expectations of two jobs at the same time? 

londonflo

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 45 years experience. 2,117 Posts

9 minutes ago, SilverBells said:

So, in addition to my current job, I also have a supplemental/PRN job. 

SilverBells, 

I know you are trying to do everything possible in terms of a work life but I have a suggestion. Like you, I worked a FT job and a PRN job. Then, because of health problems I had some down time. I discovered the world of hobbies! I had always loved antiques and turned it into a small (vary small) business. Met lots of people who were not in health care (so refreshing) and developed new friends! What do you enjoy doing? Look at ways to get involved with those areas and it will re=energize you. The only think that working PRN does is move you into a higher tax bracket, without the deductions the rich have!

Emergent, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 29 years experience. 2 Articles; 4,012 Posts

Ditto. 

Daisy4RN

Daisy4RN

Specializes in Travel, Home Health, Med-Surg. Has 20 years experience. 1 Article; 2,109 Posts

I tried that once. Had a full time job and did PRN HH. It wasn’t too bad at the time bc paperwork/expectations were much less. I tried HH much later and quit due to the increase in work load. I can’t imagine trying to keep up with all the nonsense now. I agree that a better life balance is more important than a little extra money (if that is what it is to you). Just bc you can doesn’t mean you should. 

Davey Do

Specializes in Psych (25 years), Medical (15 years). Has 43 years experience. 1 Article; 10,085 Posts

4 hours ago, SilverBells said:

Has anyone else ever struggled to balance/meet expectations of two jobs at the same time? 

Yeah, back in the mid '90's, I worked full time at an LTC and also did per diem for an HH agency. That was also about the time my free lance art took off, so I was street cartooning, doing shows, commissions, murals, etc. and was also on the county arts council board.

Like you, SilverBells, in the early 'aughts, I was in a managerial position, working 50-60 hours per week- salaried- plus doing my art thing, which had expanded considerably. 

Then, in '03, I got a really good paying job at Wrongway Regional Medical Center where I made more money than my previous nursing positions and art income combined, so I hung up my professional art guns. I've done art ever since, predominately for pleasure, with a commission here and there.

Here's hoping you have a similar happy ending, SilverBells!

 

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 16 years experience. 14,293 Posts

Yes, back when I was an L&D nurse and had just moved to Denver, I had a full-time job, a part-time per diem job, and I was also in school to get my nurse-midwifery degree. That lasted about 3 months total and I practically had a nervous breakdown. 

LibraNurse27

LibraNurse27, BSN, RN

Specializes in Community Health, Med/Surg, ICU Stepdown. Has 9 years experience. 972 Posts

I had a full time and a per diem and only lasted 5 months working 6 days a week. I felt guilty quitting the per diem after only 5 months, but I felt my performance at both jobs was starting to suffer due to fatigue. If you don't absolutely need the money, quit the PRN. Too much! And agree with above, it pushed me into a higher tax bracket, which in CA means I was losing almost 40% of my income!! It came out to a very tiny profit margin LOL

ClaraRedheart, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg. Has 8 years experience. 359 Posts

I've never done a per diem job, but I did do a capacity plan on my med-surg unit on a busy year right before covid. That meant that I would work an overtime shift every other week. Close to the end of it, I was not in a good head space. My resting heart rate was in the high 80's or 90s. I had to go on buspar, which I still only take other than morning meds on work days at 11 am and 3 pm. This is just to keep from crying at work when I get frustrated. All this to say... the money from extra work is great. But is it worth it? It wasn't for me. Still can't get off the meds and since everything has been crazy since covid, looking to transfer. Hope it's better for you, but if it's not, I'd drop the PRN job. 

 

 

LibraNurse27

LibraNurse27, BSN, RN

Specializes in Community Health, Med/Surg, ICU Stepdown. Has 9 years experience. 972 Posts

4 hours ago, ClaraRedheart said:

Still can't get off the meds and since everything has been crazy since covid, looking to transfer.

Once on psych meds it can be hard to get off, due to dependence and withdrawal. I tried to taper down on my own when I was running out and when I felt my high dose of lamictal was affecting my memory/concentration. Doing it alone while working was stupid, and caused my performance at work to suffer. I ended up having to take time off (ten weeks!) to meet with a doctor and safely adjust to the right dose while not working as to not be a danger to patients.

I hope you can find a new job and have time off in between ending your current job and starting the new one to figure out your meds and come off if you can/want to. But if you need them long term there is no shame in that!

sleepwalker

sleepwalker, MSN, NP

Specializes in Occupational Health. Has 18 years experience. 331 Posts

On 10/28/2021 at 1:30 PM, londonflo said:

SilverBells, 

I know you are trying to do everything possible in terms of a work life but I have a suggestion. Like you, I worked a FT job and a PRN job. Then, because of health problems I had some down time. I discovered the world of hobbies! I had always loved antiques and turned it into a small (vary small) business. Met lots of people who were not in health care (so refreshing) and developed new friends! What do you enjoy doing? Look at ways to get involved with those areas and it will re=energize you. The only think that working PRN does is move you into a higher tax bracket, without the deductions the rich have!

True dat!

2BS Nurse, BSN

Has 9 years experience. 670 Posts

 "Back when I was an L&D nurse and had just moved to Denver, I had a full-time job, a part-time per diem job, and I was also in school to get my nurse-midwifery degree. That lasted about 3 months total and I practically had a nervous breakdown."

This makes me anxious just thinking about it! If I need meds to do my job, I'm taking a job at Starbucks, or better yet, the library!

BeatsPerMinute

BeatsPerMinute, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 8 years experience. 318 Posts

I have failed to meet expectations for 3 jobs so far and I haven't even been in the field that long (less than 2 hands - as in, fewer than 10 yrs) 

I understand that might not what be what you're getting at... It sounds like (after reading your explanation and your responses to others posts), that you feel like you're not meeting expectations while working 2 jobs (at the same time). I am just pointing that out for clarifications sake. 

It sounds like you're being very hard on yourself. You cannot do it all. be kind to yourself. Allow yourself some respite time. Easier said than done. If you feel that you cannot do that for yourself, then it (to me) sounds like there is a there's a boundary issue that exists somewhere. You're entitled to take care of yourself ❤️ 

They are just jobs. You can always find a new job.

Think about it this way: would it be worth the risk to continue as is and deal with the worst case scenarios and burn BOTH bridges?... or might it be better for you to lighten the load a little bit so that you can give more to one or the other and then also a bit of time back to yourself ? I've burned myself to the ground doing more than I could handle on several occasions... I constantly told myself that I could handle more and it didn't end up real great for me. It's better to not do that to oneself