Jump to content

how hard is the math in nursing programs? how about the HESI exam?

Students   (1,537 Views 10 Comments)
by codyiscool codyiscool (New Member) New Member

591 Visitors; 11 Posts

advertisement

just curious as i struggle with math, always have gotten C's

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SummitRN has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

2 Articles; 30,233 Visitors; 1,501 Posts

It is amazingly simplistic math. There isn't a single nursing calculation that I wouldn't have been able to do by 6th grade. It is a terrifying thought that any high school graduate would have problems with nursing school math

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woodenpug is a BSN and specializes in MPCU.

7,235 Visitors; 733 Posts

shhh... nurses are not good at math. I struggle with differentials, i'm o.k. with integrals (yeah, weird). But .....OMG math!!!!! What u need is enough to understand basic chem. (remember the preq's to the preq's?) To paraphrase SummitAP "Are you smarter than a 5th grader?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tyvin is a BSN, RN and specializes in Hospice / Psych / RNAC.

17,667 Visitors; 1,620 Posts

It really depends on if you're planning on going into a BSN program; if you are then the university I went to required college level algebra in order to be able to take the probability and statistics course required for the BSN program. I know my friends who were doing the ADN didn't have to take the stats and had a lot better time because they didn't have to do that math.

The plus with taking the stats and all that math is I can actually help my kids with their math homework. :lol2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,858 Visitors; 49 Posts

There is nothing beyond simple Algebra that is needed. If you can convert units and solve an equation such as 10x = 95 for the variable x, then you can do all of the math required for nursing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

stephie_love specializes in L&D.

2,706 Visitors; 100 Posts

Practice makes perfect! I never did particularly well in math classes, but once I got the hang of medication conversions and such, it is very easy. It's pretty much all dimensional analysis from chemistry...

Good luck! You can do it! :yeah:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

591 Visitors; 11 Posts

i'm probably gonna go thru a community college for my nursing....debating on getting an LPN and going straight to the 3/4 semester without going on the waiting list...or waiting on the list and take semesters 1-4....i have one more pre req...what is a co req?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IdrilRN has 12 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Psych.

4,707 Visitors; 136 Posts

My ADN math class was on the 7th grade level. My proff said, no previous math XP needed. We had 3 weeks of dosage calc, and the rest was just basic math concepts, basic algebra and geometry. I had tried the Comunity college equivlant and failed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Silverdragon102 has 30 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC.

6 Followers; 1 Article; 142,151 Visitors; 38,728 Posts

moved to the General Nursing Student Discussions forum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10,237 Visitors; 535 Posts

My school is really hepped up on us being able to do math without a calculator. We had to pass a math test in semester 1, and we have another one in semester 2.

That said, the material has been:

addition

subtraction

multiplication

division

(review those multiplication tables, b/c the 6s through 9s you probably haven't used in a while, hehe)

solve an equation for an unknown

set up ratios and proportions and then solve for an unknown

fractions: add, subtract, multiply, divide

units conversions; English to SI and the reverse, given the factors they want us to use (NO CALCULATOR)

There are formatting requirements for numbers that have decimal points in them: We use 0.2 ml, not .2 ml, for example. And there are other rules for the formatting of numbers in med calcs, to help prevent reading numbers wrong and thus prevent math errors.

Your drug calc book will have all of that in the early chapters, most likely. You could look at a GED Math review book, too. That's what I used for the pre-entrance exams, a GED math book. It had been years since I'd had to do pencil and paper calculations. That's what calculators are for, lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×