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Graves disease thyroidectomy

Operating Room   (2,290 Views 5 Comments)
by jusstme jusstme (New Member) New Member

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Hello i am doing a hypothetical case study on a patient with graves disease and hyprethyroidism who will have a thyroidectomy. if you can please answer these questions i would highly appreciate it.

what is commonly given for anesthesia?

what type of intubation is used? orotracheal intubation nasotracheal intubation

what are the pain meds given before and after surgery?

when is synthroid medication started after surgery?

thank you so much:D

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loricatus specializes in ED, ICU, PACU.

1,446 Posts; 13,094 Profile Views

hello i am doing a hypothetical case study on a patient with graves disease and hyprethyroidism who will have a thyroidectomy. if you can please answer these questions i would highly appreciate it.

what is commonly given for anesthesia? depends on the anesthesiologist.

what type of intubation is used? orotracheal intubation nasotracheal intubation

what are the pain meds given before and after surgery? anesthesiologist decides if anything is to be given in pre-op & there are usually standing orders (by the anesthesiologist) in the pacu for pain like morphine and fentanyl when is synthroid medication started after surgery? when the pt can start swallowing (but remember that thyroid hormones take time to both lower and raise)thank you so much:d

http://thyroid.about.com/od/thyroiddrugstreatments/a/thyroidsurgery.htm

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loricatus specializes in ED, ICU, PACU.

1,446 Posts; 13,094 Profile Views

Thanks for the information

do you think it would be safe to say that the anesthesia used was propofol?

Based on my experience in the PACU, I would say no because the other forms of general anesthesia are more easily reversed if the need arises. Propofol was generally reserved for the quicker procedures like EGDs & or spinal injections for pain patients.

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Rose_Queen is a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

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Our CRNAs and MDAs use propofol only for induction, in conjunction with succinylcholine/rocuronium/vecuronium, and then switch to inhalational agents (sevoflurane/desflurane) to keep the patient asleep for the surgery.

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