Will Military take an ADN/Diploma nurse with BSc. in another field?

  1. Will the Navy, Marines, Army or Air Force take and ADN or Diploma nurse with a bachelor's degree in another field?

    I have two Bsc. degrees plus 1/4 of aa MPH degree. I have been looking to joining after I become an RN.

    From the website they say they require a BSN. Back during my early college days in the 90's I was told that all you needed to become an officer is a Bachelor's degree.

    I know you can join the reserves as and ADN, but the initial period for someone with no previous military service is eight years. I would much rather do active duty for 3 years or so.

    I don't want to call a recrutier or sign that form online 'cause I really don't want anyone calling my house all the time.

    Does anyone know? I am partial to the Navy, but I will take info on any service branch.
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    About sunnyjohn

    Joined: Feb '05; Posts: 2,694; Likes: 126
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    30 Comments

  3. by   lalajenn
    Hi! I was told for the Army and Air Force that you had to have a BSN specifically in nursing. Now I was told that by other people and not by an actual recruiter because I too don't want to sign things online or have people call me all of the time at home. I wish I knew a recruiter personally. lol Hopefully someone out there really knows the right answer though. I was thinking of doing the same thing myself.


    Quote from sunnyjohn
    Will the Navy, Marines, Army or Air Force take and ADN or Diploma nurse with a bachelor's degree in another field?

    I have two Bsc. degrees plus 1/4 of aa MPH degree. I have been looking to joining after I become an RN.

    From the website they say they require a BSN. Back during my early college days in the 90's I was told that all you needed to become an officer is a Bachelor's degree.

    I know you can join the reserves as and ADN, but the initial period for someone with no previous military service is eight years. I would much rather do active duty for 3 years or so.

    I don't want to call a recrutier or sign that form online 'cause I really don't want anyone calling my house all the time.

    Does anyone know? I am partial to the Navy, but I will take info on any service branch.
    Last edit by lalajenn on Aug 26, '05
  4. by   TashaLPN2006RN2012
    My husband is in the Army as well as my MIL and my dad was prior Navy, i posed your question to them and the same response was to go see a recruiter =( I would simply pop into one of the offices there and ask your questions. you can also tell them that you do NOT want them to contact you, as long as you tell them that they HAVE to leave you alone!

    My MIL is a ADN RN, and has a bach in teaching. She's a first lt. in the army reserves and signed for only 3 years. Now some recruiting things tend to change literally overnight...welcome to the military LOL...so again it's better to just go in and ask...

    I know on the amry.mil website there are recruiters online during the day in a "chat room" and you can pose questions to them without signing up on anything...not sure if the navy has that also but it's worth looking into!

    good luck!

    tasha
  5. by   lindarn
    Quote from tashaLPN2006
    My husband is in the Army as well as my MIL and my dad was prior Navy, i posed your question to them and the same response was to go see a recruiter =( I would simply pop into one of the offices there and ask your questions. you can also tell them that you do NOT want them to contact you, as long as you tell them that they HAVE to leave you alone!

    My MIL is a ADN RN, and has a bach in teaching. She's a first lt. in the army reserves and signed for only 3 years. Now some recruiting things tend to change literally overnight...welcome to the military LOL...so again it's better to just go in and ask...

    I know on the amry.mil website there are recruiters online during the day in a "chat room" and you can pose questions to them without signing up on anything...not sure if the navy has that also but it's worth looking into!

    good luck!

    tasha
    I think that all active duty nurses have to have a Bachelor's Degree, but I am not sure if it needs to be in nursing. The Army and AF Reserve nurses don't have to have a BSN, but I believe that the Navy went to an all BSN reserve force several years ago. The Army and the AF nurse can commission with a Diploma or ADN. On another point, when I was transferring from a unit reservist to the IMA program, and I interviewed at the active duty hospital here, the Chief Nurse told me that if I didn't have a BSN, like all the active duty nurses, she would not have accepted me. Period.

    Life is easier in the military, because ALL OF THE ACTIVE DUTY NURSES HAVE THEIR BSN'S, OR HIGHER. THERE IS NO BACKBITING OVER ENTRY IN TO PRACTICE, BECAUSE ALL OF THEM HAVE THE SAME EDUCATIONAL PREPARATION TO GO ACTIVE DUTY. THAT IS THE WAY IT SHOULD BE IN ALL ASPECTS OF NURSING, NOT JUST THE MILITARY. IT WOULD MAKE EVERYONES LIFE A LITTLE EASIER. AND BY THE WAY, THE NURSES ARE ALL OFFICERS, AND THE LPN'S, X- RAY TECHS, LAB TECHS, CARDIVASCULAR TECHS, ETC., ARE ENLISTED. THAT IS THE DIFFERANCE BETWEEN RN'S AND LPNS. RNS ARE OFFICERS, AND LPNS, AND ALL OTHERS, ARE ENLISTED. I ASSUME YOU UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERANCE. IF MORE RN'S THOUGHT OF THEMSELVES AS OFFICERS, THERE WOULD NOT BE THE IMAGE PROBLEMS IN NURSING, BEING BULLIED BY ADMINISTRATION, ETC. WHO OF COURSE, THINKS OF NURSES AS ENLISTED, AS DOES MOST OF THE PUBLIC. THIS IS NOT MEANT TO BELITTLE ANYONE, BUT IT IS ACCEPTED MINDSET IN THE MILITARY, THAT OFFICERS HAVE AN IMAGE, AND ENLISTED HAVE AN IMAGE. OFFICERS HAVE A PROFESSIONAL IMAGE, AND THE ENLISTED HAVE A BLUE COLLAR IMAGE. THAT BLUE COLLAR IMAGE, IN CIVILIAN NURSING, IS THE IMAGE THAT NURSES PORTRAY TO THE PUBLIC.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  6. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from sunnyjohn
    Will the Navy, Marines, Army or Air Force take and ADN or Diploma nurse with a bachelor's degree in another field?

    I have two Bsc. degrees plus 1/4 of aa MPH degree. I have been looking to joining after I become an RN.

    From the website they say they require a BSN. Back during my early college days in the 90's I was told that all you needed to become an officer is a Bachelor's degree.

    I know you can join the reserves as and ADN, but the initial period for someone with no previous military service is eight years. I would much rather do active duty for 3 years or so.

    I don't want to call a recrutier or sign that form online 'cause I really don't want anyone calling my house all the time.

    Does anyone know? I am partial to the Navy, but I will take info on any service branch.
    You cannot be a nurse in the United States Marine Corps. The USMC falls under the Dept. of the Navy, therefore Marines come under the medical care of the Navy. I'm a USMC Veteran, 1980-1988.

    I received my ADN in 1998. I applied/accepted direct commission 1LT USAR Nurse Corps back in 2003. Then, in 2004 completed my BSN. I know that in the Army Medical Dept. you can have an ADN as a member of the [RC] Reserve Component, however cannot be promoted to the rank of MAJ unless a BSN.

    My suggestion for you is to seek out an Army Health Care Recruiter since they are the ones that can answer your specific questions.

    Good luck!
  7. by   infinity9092
    The Air Force requires a BSN to go active duty. You may begin working with a recruiter and actually get selected when your within 12 months of your BSN but you will not leave until it has been awarded.

    The Air Force changed its rule degree requirement about three years ago because without a BSN your promotional growth is basically stunted at Captain and you are ineligible for the various nursing scholarships and other educational opportunities which require a BSN.
  8. by   keity
    Hi! im keity a student nurse.. I just want to ask and im curious about
    what are the differences between working in the military as a nurse than a nurse in the hospital?
  9. by   serinity in life
    The Navy will take you with an ADN, but you will be enlisted. I believe the Army will take you with a commission as an ADN but unsure of that.
  10. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from Corvette Guy
    You cannot be a nurse in the United States Marine Corps. The USMC falls under the Dept. of the Navy, therefore Marines come under the medical care of the Navy. I'm a USMC Veteran, 1980-1988.

    I received my ADN in 1998. I applied/accepted direct commission 1LT USAR Nurse Corps back in 2003. Then, in 2004 completed my BSN. I know that in the Army Medical Dept. you can have an ADN as a member of the [RC] Reserve Component, however cannot be promoted to the rank of MAJ unless a BSN.

    My suggestion for you is to seek out an Army Health Care Recruiter since they are the ones that can answer your specific questions.

    Good luck!
    Sorry but current policy of the Army is you go in with an ADN, you go in as an E4 (active duty only).

    Grannynurse
  11. by   PickyRN
    I have a BS and a MA in another field (theology) and I have my associates RN degree. I have checked into the same thing (can I be a nurse in the military with a combination of these degrees) and what I have been told is that I can join the military right now as a corpsman (enlisted), or as a line officer (non-nurse), but if I want to be an RN in the military, I need my BSN. It's only 18months away! RN to BSN programs are everywhere.

    PickyRN, soon to be in the NCP.
  12. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from PickyRN
    I have a BS and a MA in another field (theology) and I have my associates RN degree. I have checked into the same thing (can I be a nurse in the military with a combination of these degrees) and what I have been told is that I can join the military right now as a corpsman (enlisted), or as a line officer (non-nurse), but if I want to be an RN in the military, I need my BSN. It's only 18months away! RN to BSN programs are everywhere.

    PickyRN, soon to be in the NCP.
    Told by whom?

    The USAR Nurse Corps would certainly accept you. I went into the USAR Nurse Corps back in 2003 w/ADN, then the following year I completed RN-BSN program. BTW, on 03 APR 06 I will report for active duty [AC] at Madigan Army Medical Center.

    Send me a PM if you have any questions that I may help you with.

  13. by   GeorgiaBoy61
    Hello-

    The USMC does not have organic medical units but has med support from the USN, as the Marine Corps is a part of the Dept of the Navy. USAF, USN and USArmy all use BSNs but I believe that the Army uses LPNs as well.
    If you patronize "Military.com" website at all, the new mdoerator over there is a former active-duty LPN/medic who goes by the screen-name 'Sekar.' Look him up - he'll fill you in on whatever you want to know. Your post doesn't say how old you are, but if you are within the age cutoff, and want USN service, being a Corpsman is a good route. They get top-notch training and many later get a BSN and a commission in the NNC. HMs (Corpsmen also called HMs - hospital man - or pharmacist mate - although this terminology might be out-of-date now) are enlisted; army LPNs are either NCOs senior enlisted or possible warrent officers. Can't recall. If you are under age 40, you can do one these jobs if the service in question can't use your LPN directly. Many jobs done by paramedics or RN/LPNs in the civilian sector are done by enlisted medics or corpsmen in the military. They get to go on missions in support of the troops - e.g. corpsmen can 'go green' and go through Fleet Marine Service School and thereby qualify to be grunts with the USMC infantry. A dangerous job, but one some people want. Corpsmen serving with the Marines are among the most decorated subsets of military personnel around. Corpsmen also serve aboard ship as members of the regular USN, in case going green isn't for you. I myself am too old to be a corpsman but wish I had done it as a younger guy, and then gotten my RN afterwards.

    Best of luck -
  14. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from GeorgiaBoy61
    Hello-

    The USMC does not have organic medical units but has med support from the USN, as the Marine Corps is a part of the Dept of the Navy. USAF, USN and USArmy all use BSNs but I believe that the Army uses LPNs as well.
    If you patronize "Military.com" website at all, the new mdoerator over there is a former active-duty LPN/medic who goes by the screen-name 'Sekar.' Look him up - he'll fill you in on whatever you want to know. Your post doesn't say how old you are, but if you are within the age cutoff, and want USN service, being a Corpsman is a good route. They get top-notch training and many later get a BSN and a commission in the NNC. HMs (Corpsmen also called HMs - hospital man - or pharmacist mate - although this terminology might be out-of-date now) are enlisted; army LPNs are either NCOs senior enlisted or possible warrent officers. Can't recall. If you are under age 40, you can do one these jobs if the service in question can't use your LPN directly. Many jobs done by paramedics or RN/LPNs in the civilian sector are done by enlisted medics or corpsmen in the military. They get to go on missions in support of the troops - e.g. corpsmen can 'go green' and go through Fleet Marine Service School and thereby qualify to be grunts with the USMC infantry. A dangerous job, but one some people want. Corpsmen serving with the Marines are among the most decorated subsets of military personnel around. Corpsmen also serve aboard ship as members of the regular USN, in case going green isn't for you. I myself am too old to be a corpsman but wish I had done it as a younger guy, and then gotten my RN afterwards.

    Best of luck -
    Hey GeorgiaBoy61, some of your terminology is very interesting

    All Army Licensed Practical Nurse [91WM6] Soldiers are enlisted [only] and can be E-5 & below. Furthermore, most 91WM6 are first combat medics [Health Care Specialist] with an MOS of 91W, or 91WY2. The United States Army Practical Nurse Course [300-M6] taught at the AMEDD Center & School, FSH, TX is approved by the Board of Nurse Examiners for the State of Texas and upon successful completion, soldiers qualify to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN). The soldier must obtain and maintain licensure as a Vocational Nurse/Practical Nurse for award of the ASI M6.

    Regards to your phrases such as subsets of military personnel, organic medical units, and so on I found to be unusually creative.



    Semper Fi!

    ... btw, I, too, am a USMC Veteran.

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