Roll Call for all Military and VA Nurses and those considering the Service - page 7

As the moderator for this forum ... I am interested to know where everyone is from, their background, branch of service (or VA VISN) and what they like the best about Military or VA Nursing .... ... Read More

  1. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from fmfnurse
    Hey There Y'all,
    I'm a civilian nurse (GS) working for the world's greatest Navy. I have the great honor of working with heroes (my FMF corpsmen who've served in OIF/OEF) and taking care of heroes (sailors, Marines, airmen, soldiers). Wish I'd done this years ago. (21 years of civilian ER and ICU experience clinically, House Supervisor role the last 10 years till coming to work for the Navy 3 years ago).
    Those of you who see my screen name (or whatever we call it on here) should know that it is a joke-there are no civil service FMF nurses, heheh, but my coworkers tease me about turning green...I just find I enjoy working with Marines the best...uRAH!
    I'd be expecially interested to hear from civil service nurses who have worked or are working OCONUS, as well as military nurses in those locations as well.
    Tell me which are your favorite OCONUS MTFs and why. Which ones to avoid, etc.
    Thanks!
    fmfnurse
    BTW, its OORAH! :wink2:

    However, Marines are the best and thank you for your compassion & care towards Devil Dogs.

    ... always remember Nov 10th, where it all began at Tun Tavern in 1775.

    Cary James Barrett [A.K.A. Corvette Guy]
    Registered Nurse, BSN 2004, ADN 1998, CST 1995-1998
    First Lieutenant, AN USAR w/5501st USAH, since 2003
    Sergeant, USMC AD, 1980-1988 Once a Marine, ALWAYS a Marine
    Last edit by Corvette Guy on Nov 12, '05
  2. by   fmfnurse
    Quote from Corvette Guy
    BTW, its OORAH! :wink2:

    However, Marines are the best and thank you for your compassion & care towards Devil Dogs.

    ... always remember Nov 10th, where it all began at Tun Tavern in 1775.

    Cary James Barrett [A.K.A. Corvette Guy]
    Registered Nurse, BSN 2004, ADN 1998, CST 1995-1998
    First Lieutenant, AN USAR w/5501st USAH, since 2003
    Sergeant, USMC AD, 1980-1988 Once a Marine, ALWAYS a Marine
    Okey Dokey now, CG, I can say it, just not spell it hehehe, but I sure know how picky you Marine-types can be about stuff like that, so please forgive me

    So, tell me, why go ANC instead of NNC if you were prior enlisted USMC?
    What is your specialty? Do you plan to go AD, or just wait your turn to be activated/mobilized/deployed to the desert???

    Semper Fi, dewd!

    fmfnurse
  3. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from fmfnurse
    Okey Dokey now, CG, I can say it, just not spell it hehehe, but I sure know how picky you Marine-types can be about stuff like that, so please forgive me

    So, tell me, why go ANC instead of NNC if you were prior enlisted USMC?
    What is your specialty? Do you plan to go AD, or just wait your turn to be activated/mobilized/deployed to the desert???

    Semper Fi, dewd!

    fmfnurse
    Forgiven, LOL.

    I chose the Army Nurse Corps for several reasons.
    1. IMHO, the US Army & USMC have more in common than the US Navy & USMC, even though the Marines fall under the Dept. of the Navy.
    2. My son was an honor graduate at FT. Sill Army BCT in 2000. He wanted to enlist in the USMC, yet he desired medical training and I suggested he consider the Army over the Navy [see #1]. He was a 91D [OR Tech] USAR for 4 years, then approved for the University of Houston Army ROTC Program, and now is a Jr at the U of H.
    3. I live about 65 miles from [BAMC] Brooke Army Medical Center, FT Sam Houston [San Antonio, TX]. Plus, my USAR Unit is at FSH, TX.
    4. At the time of my desire to enter to military as a nurse I was an ADN. I accepted direct commission as 1LT AN, USAR in 2003, and in Aug 2004 I achieved my BSN.
    5. I have applied for the [USAGPAN] US Army Graduate Program in Anesthesia Nursing, Jun 06. However, even though I have Phi Theta Kappa Honors, 3.4 GPA, and 3.766 GPA in AAS in Surgical Technology, AAS in Nursing, and BSN respectively I've been told my acceptance to the USAGPAN is unlikely d/t less than competitve GRE scores.
    My AOC [MOS speak for officers] is 66E (OR RN), and Secondary AOC is 66H (MedSurg). However, I've been working as an 66H8A [CCRN] on drill Saturdays at BAMC. If I'm not accepted into the USAGPAN, then I have an offer to leave the [RC] Reserves and come over to [AC] active duty as an 66H at BAMC for the CCRN course, then gain the additional 8A skill identifier. I'd prefer to be in the AC, rather than get mobilized on active duty for 6-18mos.

    BTW, your username is outstanding ... Fleet Marine Force Nurse ... OORAH!
  4. by   fmfnurse
    Quote from corvette guy
    forgiven, lol.

    i chose the army nurse corps for several reasons.
    1. imho, the us army & usmc have more in common than the us navy & usmc, even though the marines fall under the dept. of the navy.
    why is that? because of the 'infantry' type focus of the two? "every marine is a rifleman", etc? isn't the marine corps the 'infantry' of the navy? (somehow, i think that question might upset somebody-in advance, no offense intended. )

    my son was an honor graduate at ft. sill army bct in 2000. he wanted to enlist in the usmc, yet he desired medical training and i suggested he consider the army over the navy [see #1]. he was a 91d [or tech] usar for 4 years, then approved for the university of houston army rotc program, and now is a jr at the u of h.

    what's his major? which nurse corps has more opportunities for operational nursing? that's the kewl stuff...where the once-in-a-lifetime experiences are that can never be matched in the civilian sector.
    1. i live about 65 miles from [bamc] brooke army medical center, ft sam houston [san antonio, tx]. plus, my usar unit is at fsh, tx.
    we'll try not to hold that against you, lol (j/k) this past summer, i flew down there in a herc belonging to one of our usmc squadrons to greet returning oif/oef marines as part of the group co's entourage. spent most of it in the burn unit and stepdown. very impressive operation y'all have down there.
    1. at the time of my desire to enter to military as a nurse i was an adn. i accepted direct commission as 1lt an, usar in 2003, and in aug 2004 i achieved my bsn.
    ooorah~ and congrats! why did you go in as an o2 instead of an o1? was it because of your prior service time? how long does the army give an adn to complete their bsn?
    1. i have applied for the [usagpan] us army graduate program in anesthesia nursing, jun 06. however, even though i have phi theta kappa honors, 3.4 gpa, and 3.766 gpa in aas in surgical technology, aas in nursing, and bsn respectively i've been told my acceptance to the usagpan is unlikely d/t less than competitve gre scores.
    you can retake the gre....??? what a shame for the army to prevent the progression of a highly motivated and experienced individual into a program of study who's graduates are a critical need, especially in a time of war... reminds me of people who treat lab results instead of patients...can't see the forest for the trees...<sigh>

    my aoc [mos speak for officers] is 66e (or rn), and secondary aoc is 66h (medsurg). however, i've been working as an 66h8a [ccrn] on drill saturdays at bamc. if i'm not accepted into the usagpan, then i have an offer to leave the [rc] reserves and come over to [ac] active duty as an 66h at bamc for the ccrn course, then gain the additional 8a skill identifier. i'd prefer to be in the ac, rather than get mobilized on active duty for 6-18mos.

    do you have your ccrn yet? that would support your ability to be successful in the crna program.

    btw, your username is outstanding ... fleet marine force nurse ... oorah!
    thanks...took you long enough to figure it out tho <wink>...lol...i keep asking for the pqs for the "civil service fmf nurse warfare device" lol
    they just don't seem to be able to locate it, hehehe
    what unit do you work on during your drill saturdays? are you employed as a nurse in the civilian world as well? or? what, do they have a "buda regional medical center"?? lol <wink> sorry 'bout that, hehehe. tell me your thoughts on working at bamc. how quickly are they consolidating services with wilford hall based on the recent brac? i understand wilford hall will be an ambulatory surgery center, and inpatient care will all be transferred to bamc, is that correct? any progress in that direction?
    what do you know about behavioral health care at bamc? any contacts in that area? despite my clinical background, i confess to a profound interest in combat stress disorders. who'da thunk it? an er nurse turning psych???
    i went to the triservice combat stress conference at camp pendleton about 6/7 months ago, and found my niche. am on our base's cism team, and provided cisd for the folks on our base who went to nola for the hurricane(s). we are working to partner with the va outpatient mental health services here to support our ad and selres folks returning from the desert. they recently received notice of funding for specific oif/oef ptsd/combat stress program, and are in the process of acquiring staff, etc. looking forward to collaborating with them to provide the specialized care our folks need.

    fmfnurse
  5. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from fmfnurse
    thanks...took you long enough to figure it out tho <wink>...lol...i keep asking for the pqs for the "civil service fmf nurse warfare device" lol
    they just don't seem to be able to locate it, hehehe
    what unit do you work on during your drill saturdays? are you employed as a nurse in the civilian world as well? or? what, do they have a "buda regional medical center"?? lol <wink> sorry 'bout that, hehehe. tell me your thoughts on working at bamc. how quickly are they consolidating services with wilford hall based on the recent brac? i understand wilford hall will be an ambulatory surgery center, and inpatient care will all be transferred to bamc, is that correct? any progress in that direction?
    what do you know about behavioral health care at bamc? any contacts in that area? despite my clinical background, i confess to a profound interest in combat stress disorders. who'da thunk it? an er nurse turning psych???
    i went to the triservice combat stress conference at camp pendleton about 6/7 months ago, and found my niche. am on our base's cism team, and provided cisd for the folks on our base who went to nola for the hurricane(s). we are working to partner with the va outpatient mental health services here to support our ad and selres folks returning from the desert. they recently received notice of funding for specific oif/oef ptsd/combat stress program, and are in the process of acquiring staff, etc. looking forward to collaborating with them to provide the specialized care our folks need.

    fmfnurse
    1. the usmc is not, i repeat not the infantry of the navy. ask one of your devil dog patients for a more elaborate explanation. the usmc & army have many similar job specialties, etc.
    2. my son's college major is biology, with a minor in military science. his goal is medical school to become a plastic surgeon.
    3. i came into the usar nurse corps as an o2e [1lt] based on years as an rn, the "e" is a prior service designation that adds about $50, or so to my military paycheck. the usar has the only nurse corps branch that will accept adns. however, to be promotable to maj you must have a bsn.
    4. i took the gre twice with a $1000.00 kaplan gre prep course in between. my scores did improve on the second attempt. i was not going to apply for the usagpan until a friend of mine [retired soldier nurse anesthetist] encouraged me to do so. he witnessed others being accepted to the same program with less competitve gre scores. i did earn an "a" in a college statistics course, and as you well know dosage calculation exams are emphasized heavily in most nursing programs plus, i've taken two pharmacology courses [lower & upper division level] with dosage cal in the curriculum. i can guarantee, without a doubt, i have what it takes to be successful in the usagpan. i was a single-parent with 2 preteen sons during my aas in surg tech program, and single-parent w/2 teenage sons during my adn program, and worked 64 hrs biweekly as a surg tech [a.k.a. scrub tech]. btw, finished w/phi theta kappa honors & 3.4 gpa respectively in the forementioned programs. my two sons left the proverbial nest during my 2 yrs in the rn-bsn online program, yet i did work +80 hrs/biweekly as an adn. i do have to thank my present wife [married 4/28/04], an er rn, for her help & support while in the rn-bsn online program, which i completed w/3.766 gpa. nonetheless, i cannot change the rules and if i'm not accepted to the usagpan d/t less than competitve gre scores, then so be it.
    5. no, i don't have ccrn certification. yet, that is not a requirement for the usagpan. yet, i'm sure is a plus for those applicants with such credentials. i do have over 12 months critical care nursing experience in the past 5 years [around 18 mths w/most as wknd nites charge rn], which per the usagpan phase i program director meets the critical care nursing requirement.
    huh? i knew the fmf acronym [fleet marine force] since i learned same back in 1980 at mcrd san diego. i just wanted to recognize your cleverness in using fmfnurse for your allnurses.com username.

    i have been working in the or at seton medical center the past 3 years. before that, about 18 months in the or at south austin medical center, 18 months in a 10 bed icu at central texas medical center, and 18 months on the telemetry floor at seton medical center. i began my health care career as scrub tech from 1995-1998.

    on drill saturdays with my usar unit i work on 2n/sicu, which is a 10 bed intensive care unit. on one of my 2 week usar annual training duties i worked 3n/stepdown unit at bamc. these are the only two areas at bamc i've had direct contact. bamc seems to be a great place to work with it being a trauma level, as well as a teaching facility. the computer charting is very user friendly, too.

    it is my understanding, in the near future [under brac] wilford hall will no longer belong to the air force. the ob/gyn related areas will be transferred to bamc. btw, [under brac] fsh will actually be expanding, yet the details i do not know.

    i was pcs at mcas el toro, ca [1985-1988] and did some security training at camp pendleton. love that part of the country. one of the soldier nurses in my usar unit organized a day long behavioral health promotion workshop [worth 5.5 ces] with emphasis on combat stress. your interest in combat stress disorders is very admirable [god bless you!].

    :uhoh21: my fingers now need a rest!
  6. by   bwidlits
    Not yet commisioned..OBC will possibly be next March..How was OBC??
  7. by   fmfnurse
    Quote from corvette guy
    1. the usmc is not, i repeat not the infantry of the navy. ask one of your devil dog patients for a more elaborate explanation. the usmc & army have many similar job specialties, etc.
    :angel2: see, i even apologized in advance....hehehe. yeah, like i would be able to live to tell about it if i asked a devil dog that... :smiley_ab
    1. my son's college major is biology, with a minor in military science. his goal is medical school to become a plastic surgeon.
    awesome~sounds like a bright young man. what about his brother, what is he doing?
    i came into the usar nurse corps as an o2e [1lt] based on years as an rn, the "e" is a prior service designation that adds about $50, or so to my military paycheck. the usar has the only nurse corps branch that will accept adns. however, to be promotable to maj you must have a bsn.
    oic...always wondered about that...so, if you don't want to make major, you can just stay a lt or capt???

    i took the gre twice with a $1000.00 kaplan gre prep course in between. my scores did improve on the second attempt. i was not going to apply for the usagpan until a friend of mine [retired soldier nurse anesthetist] encouraged me to do so. he witnessed others being accepted to the same program with less competitve gre scores. i did earn an "a" in a college statistics course, and as you well know dosage calculation exams are emphasized heavily in most nursing programs plus, i've taken two pharmacology courses [lower & upper division level] with dosage cal in the curriculum. i can guarantee, without a doubt, i have what it takes to be successful in the usagpan. i was a single-parent with 2 preteen sons during my aas in surg tech program, and single-parent w/2 teenage sons during my adn program, and worked 64 hrs biweekly as a surg tech [a.k.a. scrub tech]. btw, finished w/phi theta kappa honors & 3.4 gpa respectively in the forementioned programs. my two sons left the proverbial nest during my 2 yrs in the rn-bsn online program, yet i did work +80 hrs/biweekly as an adn. i do have to thank my present wife [married 4/28/04], an er rn, for her help & support while in the rn-bsn online program, which i completed w/3.766 gpa. nonetheless, i cannot change the rules and if i'm not accepted to the usagpan d/t less than competitve gre scores, then so be it.
    wow!!! that is incredible! kudos to you!
    one question tho-acceptance to usagpan is not the same as acceptance to the crna school itself is it? there are two crna programs up here, and both say that if you aren't accepted the first time, you can reapply, but then are required to have ccrn cert. seems ridiculous to me-i mean, i would think they want well-rounded folks, who can focus on school while also doing ten other things at the same time, rather than the typical, sheltered professional student who lives in a vacuum. that would tell me that the person is motivated and has the aptitude to be successful. kudos to your wife as well...hard to live with somebody who's going to school fulltime and working fulltime! heheh which rn-bsn online program did you go to? how was it? recommend it or nay? why or why not?
    1. no, i don't have ccrn certification. yet, that is not a requirement for the usagpan. yet, i'm sure is a plus for those applicants with such credentials. i do have over 12 months critical care nursing experience in the past 5 years [around 18 mths w/most as wknd nites charge rn], which per the usagpan phase i program director meets the critical care nursing requirement.
    (see above)
    1. huh? i knew the fmf acronym [fleet marine force] since i learned same back in 1980 at mcrd san diego. i just wanted to recognize your cleverness in using fmfnurse for your allnurses.com username.
    sorry...my dry sense of humor doesn't translate into email very well. i appreciate the acknowledgement i thought it was kinda kewt myself...especially since there is no such thing as a civil service fmf nurse hehehe...though i keep raggin' them at work to locate the performance qualificatoin statement so i can get checked off everything for the civil-service fmf nurse warfare device but, if there was such thing, i'd e first in line!!!


    i have been working in the or at seton medical center the past 3 years. before that, about 18 months in the or at south austin medical center, 18 months in a 10 bed icu at central texas medical center, and 18 months on the telemetry floor at seton medical center. i began my health care career as scrub tech from 1995-1998.
    what did you do in real life, before you went to scrub tech school?

    on drill saturdays with my usar unit i work on 2n/sicu, which is a 10 bed intensive care unit. on one of my 2 week usar annual training duties i worked 3n/stepdown unit at bamc. these are the only two areas at bamc i've had direct contact. bamc seems to be a great place to work with it being a trauma level, as well as a teaching facility. the computer charting is very user friendly, too.
    are you talking about chcs ii? we are being trained this week coming up on it's use. i like to use icdb a lot, so it seems like they are very similar, as in gui interface vice the dos type legacy program chcs. while it will modify many of our processes, it will also automate some, ie coding, which will hopefully lead to more accurate rvu expression. i thought when i went to work for the navy i would be done with the bean-counter approach to medicine. of course, i've been a nurse long enough to remember back in the old days, before drgs when we didn't have fax machines and computers....and of course, it was great to transfer to working in the icu, with one the best things about it being that we didn't have to wear our caps in the unit. i remember when drgs came along, we <shocked look> actually had to start counting how many 4x4's we used in a dressing change...

    it is my understanding, in the near future [under brac] wilford hall will no longer belong to the air force. the ob/gyn related areas will be transferred to bamc. btw, [under brac] fsh will actually be expanding, yet the details i do not know.
    who will it belong to? i understand that all military enlisted medical training-dod wide-will be moved to san antonio, as well. yes, it wasn't too long ago that fsh was worried about closing....how times change!

    i was pcs at mcas el toro, ca [1985-1988] and did some security training at camp pendleton. love that part of the country. one of the soldier nurses in my usar unit organized a day long behavioral health promotion workshop [worth 5.5 ces] with emphasis on combat stress. your interest in combat stress disorders is very admirable [god bless you!].
    that was my first trip to southern california in about 30 some years. it was absolutely beautiful. and, you didn't have to look very far to see the ocean.
    i thought texas had beautiful highways when wildflower season is happening, but southern california has texas beat in that regard hands down. too bad the cost of living is so high. i brought a sunday paper home to show my husband of 17 years how our house would compare to there....it would be considered a little mcmansion lol..and well out of our price range hehehe

    thank you for your kind words regarding my interest in combat stress. sadly, i believe that we are heading towards a tsunami-like effect in terms of the sheer volume of folks who will require some form of help or support in dealing with the lingering effects of duty where the enemy is difficult to recognize, etc. there were many lessons learned from previous conflicts that benefitted todays warriors, but not much can be done to mitigate the difficulties encountered when the enemy is invisible. hopefully there can be sensitive, focused support for these individuals as they try to reintegrate into the civilian world.
    wow, i would have loved to have gone to that workshop. does your soldier-nurse-colleague have it on powerpoint that (s)he would be willing to share??? i can email you my work email address if so...

    :uhoh21: my fingers now need a rest!
    hehehe, i hear ya buddy!

    fmfnurse
  8. by   fmfnurse
    Quote from bwidlits
    Not yet commisioned..OBC will possibly be next March..How was OBC??

    Hey There bwidlits!
    Sorry, I don't know what OBC is...officer basic something? Which branch of the service are you entering, and in what status (AD or Reserve)? What is your practice environment (hospital, clinic, etc) as a civilian and what is your clinical specialty/role (again, as a civilian)? When will you be commissioned? Where do you expect to be stationed after officer indoctrination? How long do you plan to stay in? And what does "bwidlits" mean??? :roll

    fmfnurse
  9. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from fmfnurse
    hehehe, i hear ya buddy!

    fmfnurse
    • my two son's are as different as night & day. i love both of them, yet the 25 yr old is lucky just to stay out of jail. so, let's not discuss him any further.
    • in the usar nurse corps you can earn up to cpt w/o a bsn. since i achieved my bsn last year i'm not really sure what the other pitfalls would be for someone stuck at cpt d/t no bsn.
    • yes, acceptance into the usagpan is the same thing as acceptance into the army medical dept. crna program, which phase i is taught at fsh/bamc. phase ii [clinical] can be at bamc, or 8 other army medical centers throughtout conus, including tripler in hawaii.
    • i completed the rn-bsn online program through university of texas medical branch, at galveston, school of nursing. we were required to attend campus lectures, seminars, etc, 2-3 x's/semester. most of the exams could be done on home pc via secure browser. this was not a self paced program. the courses were on schedule with the generic [classroom] bsn students. the nsg research course was awful, and i dropped it the first time. the instructors did not understand why i wanted to do so with a low "b", however they granted my request. i was taking another course, too, and did not want that one to suffer. so, earned an "a" in the course i did not drop, then earned a "b" the next semester in the research course. yes, i would recommend the program to others. yet, i'd recommend either be very good with pc, or learn fast, and only work part-time. i did work full-time & ended up w/3.766 gpa.
    • before becoming a scrub tech [1995]; graduated hs 1979, steel factory 1979-1980, usmc 1980-1988 [aircraft electrician/com nav tech], 1989-1992 e-systems [aircraft electrician], 1992-1995 trinity valley community college & austin community college [plus, odd jobs, certified soccer referee, school work study program, and raise my two sons. ]
    • what is chcs ii, icdb, gui interface, blah, blah, blah? :chuckle i'm not that technical when in comes to specific computer programs.
    • i don't know the details about wilford hall in regard to brac.
    • the workshop was an all day event presented by several different speakers. sorry, i don't believe the workshop is available on powerpoint.
  10. by   fmfnurse
    [quote=corvette guy]
    • yes, acceptance into the usagpan is the same thing as acceptance into the army medical dept. crna program, which phase i is taught at fsh/bamc. phase ii [clinical] can be at bamc, or 8 other army medical centers throughtout conus, including tripler in hawaii.
    :wink2: yes, that would be really tough-phase ii at tripler, hehehe. tripler would also be cool, because they have a telemedicine program there for the smaller pac-area icu's (naval hospital guam, for one). they monitor the patients electronically at tripler that are located physically at nh guam's icu. guam doesn't have intensivists, so this provides them with access to specialty care offsite. pretty kewl, huh? i look to see civilian rural care move in this same direction, and those that have the experience working in that environment all the better for them.
    • i completed the rn-bsn online program through university of texas medical branch, at galveston, school of nursing. we were required to attend campus lectures, seminars, etc, 2-3 x's/semester. most of the exams could be done on home pc via secure browser. this was not a self paced program. the courses were on schedule with the generic [classroom] bsn students. the nsg research course was awful, and i dropped it the first time. the instructors did not understand why i wanted to do so with a low "b", however they granted my request. i was taking another course, too, and did not want that one to suffer. so, earned an "a" in the course i did not drop, then earned a "b" the next semester in the research course. yes, i would recommend the program to others. yet, i'd recommend either be very good with pc, or learn fast, and only work part-time. i did work full-time & ended up w/3.766 gpa.
    :hatparty: 3.766 isn't anything to sneeze over. great job~
    • what is chcs ii, icdb, gui interface, blah, blah, blah? :chuckle i'm not that technical when in comes to specific computer programs.
    hehehe, silly yew. chcs=composite health care system, which is the dod healthcare computer system. i'm sure you use it at bamc. chcs ii is the upgrade, and when i was down at bamc, i could've sworn i saw signage referring to it (that it had been implemented). icdb=integrated clinical database, which was developed by the air force as an interim measure until chcs ii implementation. gui interface = graphical user interface, which essentially means point-and-click capability (as opposed to entering lines of instruction). in the legacy system (chcs), you couldn't see everything on one screen: ie, say you want to see a patient's labs and meds...you'd have to enter separate instruction strings and view them on different screens. icdb pulled the information out of chcs, but put it in a one-screen format: you can see someone's outpatient appointments, labs, rad, meds, etc, all on one screen by pointing and clicking with your mouse. chcs ii takes that a step further by becoming the electronic health record. no more handwritten sf600s, etc. and, any mtf can view any patient's info...so if you were tad in san diego and got sick, they could see our health history from your originating mtf. nothing short of a revolution as far as i'm concerned, a good one!!!!

    well, i'm not usually online as often as the last few days, but i got flumist last friday, and started getting sick monday...(live virus...if you have the choice, take the shot instead)..and i haven't felt up to sitting up for very long, much less going anywhere....so will try to check back from time to time. best of luck to you!!!!

    fmfnurse
  11. by   Terpole
    This may be a stupid question but I wanted to know, if a nurse with a BSN joined the military, worked as a nurse for ten years, got out, and then started working for the VA, would his/her service in the military count for the VA job too (as in retirement, senority, etc. like if 10 yrs service + 5 yrs as VA nurse = 15 yrs as VA nurse)?
  12. by   solicitous86
    I might be the youngest gal on this forum. I'm 19 and will start my first year of nursing (BSN) school next fall. I want to join the military when i get out for better advancement opportunities, travel experience, and a competitive edge that civilians may not have... if anyone can give me advice or insight.. i'd greatly appreciate it. Merci, Gracias, Grazi, Bedankt
  13. by   serinity in life
    Hello all.. Started as a 91A..(Field Medic) back in 1985 in the Army, was in for 3 years. Took 10 year break to have my kids and find my path. Became an LPN in 2001 and joined the ranks of the wonderful world of the VA VISN 15, at the same time a became a Navy Coreman in the reserves...That lasted 3 years, I guess three years at a time was all I could take. I am still at the VA and love my job, I have worked the Onc. floor, med/surg floor, ER, and subspecialty clinic. Great experience and would never trade it for anything. The patients have so much life experience, and are truely greatto work with. Unfortunatly as an LPN in the VA there are things that they don't let you do that you do elsewhere like verify orders, but small price to pay for great benifets......... LOVE MY JOB!!!!

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