Military nursing as a single parent?

  1. I am wondering if it is possible to be a military nurse as a single parent. I have already done six years active duty enlisted so I know that deployments and standing duty come with the job. I would like to know realistically however if this is a remote possibility. When I was a sailor our work schedule was basically 0645-1500 M-F except when standing duty or out to sea. What are schedules like for military nurses? Do you work 3 12 hour shifts usually or is it more like 5 to 6 12 hour shifts per week? I would like to hear from all branches please.

    In some of the of the previous posts some of you mentioned that the Air Force is parent friendly what exactly is meant by this? Thanks for all the help you all can give me. I would love to come back in the military but I want to hear the real truth from those of you that are actually working. This includes reservists too.

    Nuberianne
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    About nuberianne_RN

    Joined: Nov '04; Posts: 135; Likes: 33

    3 Comments

  3. by   yelper42
    Hi there. Glad to hear you are considering the service again. I have been an Army for ten years and still going. I can retire(was enlisted for ten too) but I like it so much I am going to stay as long as they will have me. My HN is a single parent and she has been deployed twice to Iraq. In the Army you have to have a good support plan to take care of your child so you can work. If you come in as a 2LT you will get rotating shifts and the like until you make a little rank and get a better job. You may get a job like in a clinic where you have decent hours but that might be the exception. If you have family maybe they could help out. It would be hard but you could do it. I have worked as a civilian also and being in the service is so much better in my opinion. You are part of something larger than yourself. Not to mention are all the benefits. The Army paid for my BSN and my masters as a psych NP. Of course you know better than anyone that serving has the deployments also and that is the down part as long as we are at war. I'm not a recruiter or anything but I really like being in uniform. I think the benefits far outweigh the downside. Hope this helps.
  4. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from yelper42
    Hi there. Glad to hear you are considering the service again. I have been an Army for ten years and still going. I can retire(was enlisted for ten too) but I like it so much I am going to stay as long as they will have me. My HN is a single parent and she has been deployed twice to Iraq. In the Army you have to have a good support plan to take care of your child so you can work. If you come in as a 2LT you will get rotating shifts and the like until you make a little rank and get a better job. You may get a job like in a clinic where you have decent hours but that might be the exception. If you have family maybe they could help out. It would be hard but you could do it. I have worked as a civilian also and being in the service is so much better in my opinion. You are part of something larger than yourself. Not to mention are all the benefits. The Army paid for my BSN and my masters as a psych NP. Of course you know better than anyone that serving has the deployments also and that is the down part as long as we are at war. I'm not a recruiter or anything but I really like being in uniform. I think the benefits far outweigh the downside. Hope this helps.
    yelper42 - Great info and thank you for your military service in the ANC and prior Army as enlisted. I, too, was enlisted for almost the same number of years.

    nuberianne - I'd like to add that all military personel w/dependents fill out an FCP [Familly Care Plan], which designates to whom will care for the minor dependents while deployed OCONUS unaccompanied. Regards to shift schedule, I work alternating three 12 hr shifts & four 12 hr shifts in a two week period at a MEDCEN ICU.
  5. by   ArmyMSN
    Just finished a deployment - its very difficult to be a single parent while deployed. You definitely need to have someone available to keep your child - same goes for your day to day working in hospitals - you can't expect to drop everything at work each time your child gets sick or needs something - you'll need definitely need a backup plan. Think very carefully as I've seen a lot of difficult situations for single Army nurses - many of which leave the Army because it just doesn't work out.

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