Looking at Navy Reserve nursing

  1. I'm looking at becoming a navy reserve nurse after I get my BSN and I'm wondering about the specific type of role I would be expected to fill. In reading about the roles of commissioned officers, it sounds like they are more like upper management. I'm just wondering how this works in nursing. Do officers fulfill the roles of nurse and/or nurse manager? Do management positions only come with promotions?
    I haven't talked with a recruiter and I'm just wondering if anyone here has any info.

    Thanks!
  2. Visit khinlicky profile page

    About khinlicky

    Joined: Aug '16; Posts: 8; Likes: 9

    4 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    Moved to the Military Nursing forum for more replies.
  4. by   DiscGolfNurse
    Greetings! You definitely should talk to a recruiter to get the most accurate information. However, I am in the process of applying for direct accession into the Navy for active duty. From what I read on the Navy website in regards to the reserves they do require that you serve 3 years active duty and then transition into the reserves.

    Commissioned officers are bedside nurses in the beginning of their career with the Navy. My recruiter informed me that at around your 8 year mark (if you plan to stay that long) they try to transition you to more managerial roles. You can also become charge nurse (with or without your own patient assignment) as early as a year in. You are still primarily a floor nurse in whichever department you sign on as but they will rotate you through the charge role. Roles are not strictly upper management but you do eventually transition to that role as your career progresses.
  5. by   carolinapooh
    Be sure you talk to a Navy health professions recruiter, not a 'regular' recruiter down by your shopping mall. They're enlisted recruiters.
  6. by   Wheaties
    Quote from DiscGolfNurse
    Greetings! You definitely should talk to a recruiter to get the most accurate information. However, I am in the process of applying for direct accession into the Navy for active duty. From what I read on the Navy website in regards to the reserves they do require that you serve 3 years active duty and then transition into the reserves.

    Commissioned officers are bedside nurses in the beginning of their career with the Navy. My recruiter informed me that at around your 8 year mark (if you plan to stay that long) they try to transition you to more managerial roles. You can also become charge nurse (with or without your own patient assignment) as early as a year in. You are still primarily a floor nurse in whichever department you sign on as but they will rotate you through the charge role. Roles are not strictly upper management but you do eventually transition to that role as your career progresses.
    hi discgolfnurse,

    i'M interested in joining the navy nurse corps. I am now 34. Was a nurse with bsn for 8 years then took a career break for 2 year. Before 2008, it seemed really easy to get into. Graduated in 2006, but I wanted to stay and work at my local hospital, then 2008 came and the financial crisis and government jobs state and federal, and also non-government jobs became limited and quite difficult to get into.

    how hard is it now in 2016? I still plan to call and talk with the officer nurse recruiter to get more information. I'm thinking it might be really competitive.

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