interviewing with NP and Chief Nurse (air force) - page 6

I'm in the process of applying for the Air Force as a new BSN/RN grad, and I'm anxious about the interviews (as well as MEPS and COT). From what I have read and heard, the NP is a phone interview and... Read More

  1. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from UTstudent
    I don't remember her name, but she was a O-6 who had specialized in OB in her early years, but she was the HEAD nurse, so she didn't do OB there.

    She was SUPER nice and easy to interview with. We basically talked the entire time, wasn't much of an interview.

    Look nice. She will ask a time when you were faced with an ethical dilemma. Ask you about your fitness (want to make sure you are fit to be in the military), ask about the AF mission and core values. Short/long-term goals? Why AF? Why nursing?

    VERY EASY interview.
    Our chief RN here (I'm at Wilford Hall) is an O5.

    But the rest is correct - she's awesome. I actually had my welcome interview with her on Friday and she is one of the nicest people I've ever met. May or may not have been the same person.
  2. by   maverickemt
    Did you have an interview with her last Friday?
  3. by   UnitedStatesRN
    Hello!

    I am joining the Air Force. My recruiter told me that I would be meeting the Jan. 26 deadline for having everything done, including the MEPS and the Chief Nurse interview. He told me that the COT class I would be able to get into should I be accepted will be at the end of May. I will be going to the Wright-Patterson AFB in Ohio for my interview. Anyone else gone there for an interview?
  4. by   fitRNpic
    I am supposed to go to Wight-Patterson to interview, but nothing has been set up yet. I keep getting screwed in some way or another. So not sure when this will happen. My recruiter is really familiar with everyone there and said that he would rather me go there to interview.
  5. by   roxxy3773
    Quote from carolinapooh
    You will pay federal tax on your pay overseas because you are an employee of the federal government that is not tax-exempt. You will also pay state income tax if your state of residence requires it. The military is never tax-free on your base pay, only on allowances.

    I spent three years in Saudi Arabia, was deployed twice, and was once extended TDY to Germany. You will always be taxed overseas. Contractors aren't up to the first eighty thousand dollars, and private citizens working overseas aren't up to the first eighty grand, but the military always is.

    I was just reading through this post and wanted to add my experience from the Army standpoint in regards to taxing and deployments. When a service member is deployed to a combat zone (Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.), base pay is not taxed federally, you are taxed on the SS/Medicare side though. There is a cap for officers, which is the maximum enlisted pay. My husband is on his 3rd deployment and each time his pay is exempt from federal taxes. I don't know when this was put into effect, but it has been this way since his first deployment in 2004.
  6. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from roxxy3773
    I was just reading through this post and wanted to add my experience from the Army standpoint in regards to taxing and deployments. When a service member is deployed to a combat zone (Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.), base pay is not taxed federally, you are taxed on the SS/Medicare side though. There is a cap for officers, which is the maximum enlisted pay. My husband is on his 3rd deployment and each time his pay is exempt from federal taxes. I don't know when this was put into effect, but it has been this way since his first deployment in 2004.
    There's a difference in being paid in a combat zone and your regular duty pay. What you're referencing has been in effect since the First Gulf War, since the 1990s (I know this because I never paid taxes while deployed when I was enlisted). What the original post was talking about was regular pay - which you will pay federal income tax on if you're stationed overseas. Deployments are different - any pay earned while you're deployed in support of a combat operation does not have federal income tax withheld. That's actually a federal mandate, not a service-specific deal; no one's pay is taxed in support of combat ops.
  7. by   roxxy3773
    Quote from carolinapooh
    There's a difference in being paid in a combat zone and your regular duty pay. What you're referencing has been in effect since the First Gulf War, since the 1990s (I know this because I never paid taxes while deployed when I was enlisted). What the original post was talking about was regular pay - which you will pay federal income tax on if you're stationed overseas. Deployments are different - any pay earned while you're deployed in support of a combat operation does not have federal income tax withheld. That's actually a federal mandate, not a service-specific deal; no one's pay is taxed in support of combat ops.
    My misunderstanding...I thought when you said that the base pay was never tax exempt that it was more of a generalized statement, not specific to overseas pay. Sorry about that!
  8. by   carolinapooh
    In my opinion - even though I have no idea how they'd do this - NO military pay should be taxed, since it's actually the product of tax revenue in the first place AND you work at the whim of the taxpayer (i.e., DOD)/Congress/the President. Since I know that's impossible, I'll take whatever we get....
  9. by   maverickemt
    Hello - I am looking for some advice on what to say and how to reply to the question of why air force in the interview? I was thinking of saying something that the interviewer has not heard from a lot of other applicants. My answer would be something like this: I have met a handful of retired air force nurses. They seem to have an attittude of nothing phases them, a great work ethic, and they seem to be the nicest of people. The air force is like playing for the yankees - everyone wants to play for them because playing for them puts people on another level. Any advice on how folks answered this one are welcome! Happy holidays!

    Thanks,
    maverickemt
  10. by   mt_nurse
    hey maverickemt-

    in my interview... i said that the the core values of the air force were in-line with the nursing profession and how i want to live... maintain integrity, serve others before myself, and excel in all that i do...
  11. by   maverickemt
    Does anyone know how many applications have been submitted to the AF board for Jan. 26th. My recruiting team in San Antonio boasts that the recruiter that I am working with has a 100% acceptance rate. I am starting to loose faith and trust in the way the military does things. One AF recruiter told me that there are 50 spots for the fully clinical qualified positions of which 26 have been selected. And so that leaves only 24 spots. Thats not a lot of spots open if a lot of people are applying.

    Thanks - maverickemt
  12. by   maverickemt
    Hello all - I would appreciate if anyone replies to this post during the holiday weekend.... Can or Does anyone know how many applications are already submitted to the boards for the Jan 23rd board? I am asking because I can wait for another board if there are too many applications already. The last time I heard my recruiter that there were 24 spots open for the January board! my recruiter also told me that the recruiter that I am working with, all of his nurses have been selected both in the NTP and fully clinically qualified programs???!!?? I don't know if I can believe him? I need numbers! Do you think I should call the colonel who makes the decisions at the board?

    I need to know because I am spending my Christmas thinking and freaking out about this!!!!!

    Thanks - Sachin
  13. by   carolinapooh
    do not under any circumstances call the board.

    what you're being exposed to now is the pentagon at her finest - she's the world's largest employer in the world's largest office building, and she moves at the slowest speeds known to man - sometimes because she is so big and sometimes just because she can.

    this is what military life is:

    (1) hurry up and wait.
    (2) while you wait, have a tall glass of pure frustration.
    (3) chase that down with a hot cup of "why the h&$# did they do it that way?!"

    and you get used to that or you're miserable for your entire commitment.

    in exchange for the best training money can buy, an honestly competitive salary with benefits you won't get anywhere else, unparalleled teamwork, and an incredible sense of pride and commitment, you're given the requisite amount of bs, frustration, stupidity, and unanswered questions. it's the nature of the job. those of us who've been a round with the feds (or in my case spent most of their lives in her hands!) know this and just accept it as a matter of rote.

    i remind myself of that whenever i see my les - and i don't see a three hundred dollar deduction for health insurance - after i've found myself shaking my head in wonderment ("why would they do x like that??"). seriously.
    Last edit by carolinapooh on Dec 24, '09

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