how's life as Rn in the Military????

  1. I'm currently in the ADN program as second semester student and also have BS in telecommunication mgmt. My question is would i be considered as officer? how is the officer bootcamp compare to non-officer bootcamp? is it hard? I'm just skiptical about the bootcamp..Please feel free to leave me a feedback..thank you

    R.
  2. Visit mustangcollege03 profile page

    About mustangcollege03

    Joined: Aug '06; Posts: 1

    30 Comments

  3. by   SGT Smiley
    Hello, mustang:

    I can speak only for the Army National Guard side of the house. You are eligible to receive a commission with a diploma or associate's degree in nursing, although most recruiters would prefer to get a nurse with a BSN. The reason is that you cannot be promoted beyond a certain point without having a Bachelors in Nursing (in other words, your BS in telecommunications would not make you eligible for promotion beyond Captain in the Army). Nurses with any degree are absolutely excellent officers, however the military considers a person's future military career before having them sign the paper, and sees a BSN as greater advancement potential for that officer. You should talk to the branch you want to join and ask about their policies, and if they have any vacancies for you.

    Secondly, officers do not go to boot camp. Only enlisted soldiers do. If you're accepted to get your direct commission as a nurse officer, you would go through Officer Basic Course (OBC) after you've already joined, which, although difficult, is shorter and offers a higher quality of life. OBC can last between two weeks (reserves) to over a month (active duty). Do a search for "Officer Basic Course" and you should find all the information you need dealing with the branch of service you're considering.

    Good luck! Ask around, do some research, and find what works for you.
  4. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from SGT Smiley
    Hello, mustang:

    I can speak only for the Army National Guard side of the house. You are eligible to receive a commission with a diploma or associate's degree in nursing, although most recruiters would prefer to get a nurse with a BSN. The reason is that you cannot be promoted beyond a certain point without having a Bachelors in Nursing (in other words, your BS in telecommunications would not make you eligible for promotion beyond Captain in the Army). Nurses with any degree are absolutely excellent officers, however the military considers a person's future military career before having them sign the paper, and sees a BSN as greater advancement potential for that officer. You should talk to the branch you want to join and ask about their policies, and if they have any vacancies for you.

    Secondly, officers do not go to boot camp. Only enlisted soldiers do. If you're accepted to get your direct commission as a nurse officer, you would go through Officer Basic Course (OBC) after you've already joined, which, although difficult, is shorter and offers a higher quality of life. OBC can last between two weeks (reserves) to over a month (active duty). Do a search for "Officer Basic Course" and you should find all the information you need dealing with the branch of service you're considering.

    Good luck! Ask around, do some research, and find what works for you.
    ADN educated Army Nurse Corps Officers cannot be promoted to Major.
  5. by   olivedrab
    Quote from SGT Smiley
    officers do not go to boot camp. Only enlisted soldiers do. If you're accepted to get your direct commission as a nurse officer, you would go through Officer Basic Course (OBC) after you've already joined, which, although difficult, is shorter and offers a higher quality of life. OBC can last between two weeks (reserves) to over a month (active duty).
    thank you so much for posting this. i got the wrong info from a friend who was going as an LPN enlisted who told me that all reserves and actives do the very same 9 week boot camp! i'm glad that ANC reserves is only 2 weeks!
  6. by   Gennaver
    Quote from mustangcollege03
    I'm currently in the ADN program as second semester student and also have BS in telecommunication mgmt. My question is would i be considered as officer? how is the officer bootcamp compare to non-officer bootcamp? is it hard? I'm just skiptical about the bootcamp..Please feel free to leave me a feedback..thank you

    R.
    Hi,
    Just posted this in response to another person's question. I am new myself to considering military nursing, at least, in putting my application together!

    http://www.dns.amedd.army.mil/ANPD/OBC/obc_index.html

    http://www.dns.amedd.army.mil/ANPD/OBC/obc_index.html
    Gen
  7. by   rn_happy
    I just got out of the military after serving out my contract.....If I had to do it all over again......I would NOT do it due to MANY reasons.....best advice.....do your homework and then make an informed decision.

    Best of Luck!
  8. by   cinja
    Quote from rn_happy
    I just got out of the military after serving out my contract.....If I had to do it all over again......I would NOT do it due to MANY reasons.....best advice.....do your homework and then make an informed decision.

    Best of Luck!
    Were you a comissioned nurse and why was it so bad.
  9. by   JaxiaKiley
    Quote from cinja
    Were you a comissioned nurse and why was it so bad.
    Wow, that shows how easily our words can be mistaken. I thought the OP was saying they would not get out of the military if they had it to do all over again!
  10. by   rn_happy
    Yes, I was a young, naive nurse when I joined and became an officer....just note that when you "sign on the dotted line" that really means that you are opting for a military "lifestyle" and not just a "job"....Being a military nurse is a 24/7 on call 365 days of the year committment. You will be told crap like "going home after your shift is a privilege, not a right." Unfortunately, the recruiters are often not nurse officers, but regardless will not tell you the bad side of things....they get paid if you join so what incentive do they have to discourage you, right?


    I on the other have done it and gain nothing by telling you the truth of my experiences....just an honest soul trying to truthfully answer your questions.
  11. by   cynt77
    Quote from rn_happy
    Yes, I was a young, naive nurse when I joined and became an officer....just note that when you "sign on the dotted line" that really means that you are opting for a military "lifestyle" and not just a "job"....Being a military nurse is a 24/7 on call 365 days of the year committment. You will be told crap like "going home after your shift is a privilege, not a right." Unfortunately, the recruiters are often not nurse officers, but regardless will not tell you the bad side of things....they get paid if you join so what incentive do they have to discourage you, right?


    I on the other have done it and gain nothing by telling you the truth of my experiences....just an honest soul trying to truthfully answer your questions.
    What branch where you in?
  12. by   cinja
    Say Happy thats just a bit to vague for me to read thru. I am a guy and a prior Marine. Am I to assume you didn't want to play GI Jane, no disrespect but I am trying to peel back the onion a bit and hope you share more, could be cathartic.:beercuphe
  13. by   NursePamela
    Not only what branch, but what specialty where you as well??
    Was there anything you liked about being Active Duty?
  14. by   rn_happy
    Yes, of course, me being in the military did have one positive.....unexpectedly I met my beloved husband and we're living happily ever after.....yes, the experience also humbled me in more ways than I can count...I witnessed first hand the true price of freedom....sacrifice and committment..

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