'Force feeding' at Guantanamo - page 2

Is this torture? I would have to think so, especially since many of the prisoners being held there have not been convicted of a crime. Every time the media covers this story, it's always a nurse... Read More

  1. by   Glycerine82
    I think to the average person, who doesn't deal with NG tubes or know anything about them it probably seems like torture. I recently read an article by "Anonymous" that showed the items used in NG feedings and described them as if they were the equivalent of putting needles in someone eyes.

    I feel like these prisoners probably have ulterior motives for starving themselves. Perhaps they would rather die than talk, maybe they actually are mentally ill. I would argue that someone accused of doing the heinous things some of those prisoners have done would have to be mentally Ill.

    I don't think while you are awaiting trial where pertinent and potentially life saving information could be obtained from you, that you should have the right to "off yourself" which is what these prisoners are trying to do. They want to die--and choose to starve themselves in order to do it.

    I come from a family of military. My uncle was a "frog man". My still living grandfather is 92 and went through the battle of the bulge. He is the most amazing wonderful man I have ever met. These detainees are suspected terrorists, and honestly, I have no sympathy for them. If you think blowing up babies is ok I think you should have far more than a tube put in your nose.

    So, no. I don't think it's torture, and I don't blame the nurses for doing it. The prisoners could choose to start eating again instead of having the NG tubes put in.
  2. by   miasmom
    I was enlisted when I was in. I did not have the option of resigning. I know the is always the bigger picture. A nurse we always try to put our selves at the other side of bed. As a military nurse we can not refuse a illegal order. I know I would have empathy for pow. The whole every mother cries for her child in war. However I also I was also in during time of cold war. If it is me or Ivan, It will be Ivan. before every deployment the is a briefing of culture. These are smart hard working idealist nurses. I just hope these nurses get some counseling after. They will suffer some form of PSTD. The world is not perfect.
  3. by   newsted44
    For those discouraged by the actions / ethical demise of your fellow nurses, do not give up hope. It is too easy to be infected with complacency ( "I did it because a person with a gun and power told me it was the right thing"). These nurses will one day be shameful for their actions and the rest of us will have to forgive in order not to be consumed.
    1. Hunger strike is civil disobedience not mental illness when protesting indefinite detention. By the way, it is international law that is being used as the excuse. By international, I mean a couple of nations, not "the world."
    2. If a person is not mentally ill (suicidal), does a nurse have the duty according to the ANA code of ethics have the right to administer an invasive procedure?
    3. Trusting your superior based on what? Military commission history is at best troublesome. Also, what seems to be the Nuremberg defense by the force feeding nurses, is hardly a settled principle and furthermore has little to do with your duty as a nurse. In the heat of this debate, my instinct is to advocate for the relief of the title, nurse, while serving.
    The ultimate superior, has what is known as a "kill list", this is murder without charge, trial or transparency that has already taken the lives of three U.S. citizens. Just like the king before We formed this nation of immigrants. Immigrants.
    It is an extreme divergance from hundreds of years of nursing development to fall in line with murder and unreasonable detention.

    Mike, MSN, PMHNP-BC and former US Marine
  4. by   chriskelly
    July 16, 2014
    Bloomberg's newsweek.com is reporting that "A Navy Nurse Is Refusing to Force-Feed a Guantanamo Inmate"


    "For the first time, a Navy medical officer has refused to force-feed hunger-striking detainees at Guantanamo Bay."



    "...The nurse who refused to force-feed Dhiab has not been identified, but appears to be a Navy lieutenant..."



    I wonder if this will be a story that will never be heard about again.
    Last edit by chriskelly on Jul 19, '14 : Reason: spelling
  5. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from chriskelly
    July 16, 2014
    Bloomberg’s newsweek.com is reporting that “A Navy Nurse Is Refusing to Force-Feed a Guantanamo Inmate”


    “For the first time, a Navy medical officer has refused to force-feed hunger-striking detainees at Guantanamo Bay.”



    “...The nurse who refused to force-feed Dhiab has not been identified, but appears to be a Navy lieutenant...”



    I wonder if this will be a story that will never be heard about again.
    More than likely not much will happen to the Lt, but it really just depends on the commander at that time.
  6. by   nurse2033
    An interesting followup to this thread. A Navy nurse is in trouble for refusing to participate.

    Top nursing group backs Navy nurse who wouldn’t force-feed at Guantánamo | The Miami Herald
  7. by   pfchang
    All Things Considered on NPR did a piece on this Navy nurse today. He has been in the military for 17.5 yrs and is at risk of dishonorable discharge. He will lose his pension if he is unable to complete 20 years. He will also lose VA benefits and his GI Bill benefits if discharged.

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