Anyone 91wm6??

  1. I am about to join the Army. 91wm6 will be my mos. I am a LPN already. I want to learn more about what Army nursing will be like. Please tell me anything about your job. What you like what you don't.
  2. Visit feb06 profile page

    About feb06

    Joined: Jun '06; Posts: 26; Likes: 1
    LPN
    Specialty: long term care, agency, correctional

    11 Comments

  3. by   Gennaver
    Quote from feb06
    I am about to join the Army. 91wm6 will be my mos. I am a LPN already. I want to learn more about what Army nursing will be like. Please tell me anything about your job. What you like what you don't.
    Hello,

    I am also in the process of trying to "access" into the Army.

    66H is for nurses, that I know of so far. I do not know how LPNs are accessed into the Army but would bet that someone will come along soon to help answer your question.

    I am looking around another site for a specific link and will edit it as soon as I find it, it may be helpful to you.
    Gen

    Aha! Found it
    91W--Health Care Specialist

    It seems that you are going in as enlisted.

    You may be interested to read around these links, the first is about enlistment bonuses for your mos and the second is more explainitory of a 91 W
    http://usmilitary.about.com/library/...nlbonusnew.htm
    http://usmilitary.about.com/od/enlistedjobs/a/91w.htm

    this final link is what the m6 stands for
    http://usmilitary.about.com/library/...kills/blm6.htm

    when you read the second link it will make much more sense to you if you have your ASVAB AFQT and composite scores too.

    Very much good luck to you, please read around and make a strong informed decision it seems that the 91W also encompass point of injury-medics-in the field.

    Gen
    Last edit by Gennaver on Aug 28, '06
  4. by   feb06
    Quote from Gennaver
    Hello,

    I am also in the process of trying to "access" into the Army.

    66H is for nurses, that I know of so far. I do not know how LPNs are accessed into the Army but would bet that someone will come along soon to help answer your question.

    I am looking around another site for a specific link and will edit it as soon as I find it, it may be helpful to you.
    Gen

    Aha! Found it
    91W--Health Care Specialist

    It seems that you are going in as enlisted.

    You may be interested to read around these links, the first is about enlistment bonuses for your mos and the second is more explainitory of a 91 W
    http://usmilitary.about.com/library/...nlbonusnew.htm
    http://usmilitary.about.com/od/enlistedjobs/a/91w.htm

    this final link is what the m6 stands for
    http://usmilitary.about.com/library/...kills/blm6.htm

    when you read the second link it will make much more sense to you if you have your ASVAB AFQT and composite scores too.

    Very much good luck to you, please read around and make a strong informed decision it seems that the 91W also encompass point of injury-medics-in the field.

    Gen

    Thanks for the info
  5. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from feb06
    Thanks for the info
    Since you already have your LPN you will enlist as a 91WM6, rather than a 91W. 91W Soldiers [A.K.A. Combat Medics, or Health Care Specialist] later on in their enlistment are able to request the Army LPN program [M6 additional skill identifier] and upon completion take the LPN Board. I can tell you the M6 program is outstanding since the M6 students do clinical rotations in the ICUs at MAMC where I work.

    Anyway, your ASVAB scores may be irrelevant, or N/A. The ASVAB score is what qualifies a recruit into a particular field [MOS] to work in the military, or Army in this case. Of course, all recruits complete basic training, then attend more specific training regards to particular MOS. You are already qualified to work as a 91WM6 based on your civilian status of LPN. Your enlistment is unique in that most recruits do not enter into military service with a skill needed by the military.

    You need to pay very close attention to your military enlistment contract not because the DoD would deceive you, but because your situation is... well unique. I would think you might have the upper hand in some preferences on the contract. You are saving the AMEDD a lot of $$$ since you are already MOS qualified [91WM6] and just need to become Army Soldier qualified via Army Basic Training.

    BTW, I am not a military recruiter. My son is presently Army ROTC [and non-deployable Army Reserve... was 91D]. I am prior active duty enlisted USMC, prior reserve ANC officer [66E & 66H], and presently active duty ANC officer [66H8A] assigned to Madigan Army Medical Center, FT Lewis, WA. I enjoy providing info to those interested in the military. I try my best to share what I know to be first hand knowledge, or close to it.
  6. by   KatieKt
    I am a 91WM6. What would you like to know?
  7. by   feb06
    Quote from Corvette Guy
    Since you already have your LPN you will enlist as a 91WM6, rather than a 91W. 91W Soldiers [A.K.A. Combat Medics, or Health Care Specialist] later on in their enlistment are able to request the Army LPN program [M6 additional skill identifier] and upon completion take the LPN Board. I can tell you the M6 program is outstanding since the M6 students do clinical rotations in the ICUs at MAMC where I work.

    Anyway, your ASVAB scores may be irrelevant, or N/A. The ASVAB score is what qualifies a recruit into a particular field [MOS] to work in the military, or Army in this case. Of course, all recruits complete basic training, then attend more specific training regards to particular MOS. You are already qualified to work as a 91WM6 based on your civilian status of LPN. Your enlistment is unique in that most recruits do not enter into military service with a skill needed by the military.

    You need to pay very close attention to your military enlistment contract not because the DoD would deceive you, but because your situation is... well unique. I would think you might have the upper hand in some preferences on the contract. You are saving the AMEDD a lot of $$$ since you are already MOS qualified [91WM6] and just need to become Army Soldier qualified via Army Basic Training.

    BTW, I am not a military recruiter. My son is presently Army ROTC [and non-deployable Army Reserve... was 91D]. I am prior active duty enlisted USMC, prior reserve ANC officer [66E & 66H], and presently active duty ANC officer [66H8A] assigned to Madigan Army Medical Center, FT Lewis, WA. I enjoy providing info to those interested in the military. I try my best to share what I know to be first hand knowledge, or close to it.
    Thank you very much for the info
  8. by   feb06
    Quote from KatieKt
    I am a 91WM6. What would you like to know?
    Awesome. I would like to know anything. Like what kind of shifts do you work? Where do you spend your day at a hospital, clinic, etc? What are your job duties? Is there time to go for RN while active duty? Do you wear scrubs or a military uniform? Have you done field nursing?
    Thanks
  9. by   KatieKt
    Quote from feb06
    Awesome. I would like to know anything. Like what kind of shifts do you work? Where do you spend your day at a hospital, clinic, etc? What are your job duties? Is there time to go for RN while active duty? Do you wear scrubs or a military uniform? Have you done field nursing?
    Thanks
    Hello! Sorry it has taken me so long to get back to you! I forgot I posted this.

    But on to your questions!


    I have worked twelve hour shifts, both day and night. Usually 7 to 7 something like that. I have also worked in an outpatient clinic doing the 8-5 thing. Some units will make you PT with them, so your day actually starts at 0530-0600 even though you dont start work until 8 or so. Usually if you're doing ward (shift) nursing they might have a special PT program for you and others who share your work schedule.

    Don't be fooled though. Enlisted LPNs get stationed anywhere. Not just hospitals. They can get stuck doing something totally non-nursing related for months on end... Like inventoring milvans and connexes. Also, theres always the Motor Pool! MmHmm. Trust me, it has happened. It happened to me. You're going to be a soldier first, nurse second. Although LPNs do have a higher chance of getting into a position where their skills are put to good use, it is not guaranteed. Just want to warn you.

    My job duties? OK, well I have worked on a ward doing inpatient duties as well as outpatient clinic stuff. So its hard to say what my duties are exactly. Be prepared that as a military LPN you're scope of practice will be higher than those of civilians. In the field (for ex: Combat Support Hospital) we are mainly put in ICUs. In a field environment (downrange) there is no JCAHO. Haha. I have not been deployed yet, but about all of the people I graduated with have. Even in regular mil hospitals you'll find yourself being able to do more things than a civ hosp. I've never worked in a civ hospital so I can't really compare. But I've read a lot of posts from LPNs here and it would seem to me that Mil Hosps are more lenient with that sort of thing.

    You will need to get your EMT-B and finish Whiskey school right? You will learn loads there I'm sure. Sometimes I wonder if these people want me to be a medic or a nurse. We have to do biannual training to keep our medic qualifications up to date as well as our nurse qualifications. One time, it had been a year since I did a "assess a combat casualty" with DCAP-BTLS and the medic sergeant jumped down my throat. I was doing it all wrong! I'm sorry, I said, I have been in nursing school for a year and a half..doing bedside oriented stuff not combat stuff. But still...gotta be ready at all times for anything, right?

    A lot of times I get some flak for being a jr enlisted LPN, because I wear a shield on my chest instead of bars. People will automatically assume I dont know what the hell I'm talking about and want to speak with a "real nurse" haha. Like I'm pretending I'm a nurse. I have gotten that a lot. People think that only officers/civilians can be nurses. Haha. OK I say and I get them an officer or a civilian LPN so they can ask them some lame question.

    There is a enlisted LPN conundrum. I dont want to go into it right now..but you will have to see what I am talking about. Its kinda like you're torn between two worlds. That of nursing, and that of being a soldier. Its definitely a conundrum. But nothing that you wont be able to live with.

    Uniforms? Depends where you work! Sometimes scrubs, sometimes its the Army issued white scrubs, sometimes its ACUs. Depends on what dept you're in and how much of a "messy factor" it has. Unless you work in Peds or something, the cutesy scrubs have to go.

    Lessee, time to go RN. Yes. Depends on how hard you work it. There are programs in place for individuals who have all the pre-reqs to go to a BSN school of their choice for free and get paid while doing so. (how sweet is that?) However, there are stipulations for that. You will have to do your own research on that. Most likely if you decide not to go that route you will only be able to knock out a few classes here and there. Unfortunately, an Army career isn't conducive to getting a nursing degree. Other career plans yes, nursing not so much. I have been in the process of knocking out a few classes myself and that is all I can do being out of the country.

    Hopefully I have answered some of your questions. I know I had a burning desire for knowledge of all things LPN/military related before I joined and I hope I gave you a good jist. Don't let me jade you though. People have completely different experiences in their careers. SO what else can I say?
    Last edit by KatieKt on Sep 22, '06
  10. by   KatieKt
    Quote from Corvette Guy

    You need to pay very close attention to your military enlistment contract not because the DoD would deceive you, but because your situation is... well unique. I would think you might have the upper hand in some preferences on the contract. You are saving the AMEDD a lot of $$$ since you are already MOS qualified [91WM6
    and just need to become Army Soldier qualified via Army Basic Training.
    Excellent advice Corvette Guy. You do have the upper hand. However, you will also need to complete the 91W portion (combat medic) of the 91WM6 program. I'm not sure, but I think you'll need the whole 16 weeks of AIT. DOnt quote me on that though.

    I've heard rumors about them making the M6s back into 91Cs again, but you know...rumors.
  11. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from KatieKt
    Excellent advice Corvette Guy. You do have the upper hand. However, you will also need to complete the 91W portion (combat medic) of the 91WM6 program. I'm not sure, but I think you'll need the whole 16 weeks of AIT. Dont quote me on that though.

    I've heard rumors about them making the M6s back into 91Cs again, but you know...rumors.
    Actually, the AMEDD is doing away with the 91 series and replacing with 68 series designation. So, what is a 91WM6 [LVN/LPN] will be a 68WM6 [LVN/LPN]. I have no idea why the numeric designation change. In fact, I asked one of the M6 enlisted instructors and he had no idea as to the reason for the numeric designation change, either.

    KatieKt, I wanted to thank you for your military service as a Soldier Nurse! The 91WM6 is a very important asset to the AMEDD. I've worked with outstanding M6s at both BAMC & MAMC in the ICU. I'm very impressed with the M6 program and the quality of enlisted Soldier Nurses in the AMEDD. It is always a pleasure as an AMEDD ANC officer to have a M6 close by.

    You can certainly be proud to wear your shield.
    Last edit by Corvette Guy on Sep 25, '06
  12. by   KatieKt
    Well thank you Sir. Its not often I hear that, so your compliments are appreciated.
  13. by   feb06
    Quote from KatieKt
    Hello! Sorry it has taken me so long to get back to you! I forgot I posted this.

    But on to your questions!


    I have worked twelve hour shifts, both day and night. Usually 7 to 7 something like that. I have also worked in an outpatient clinic doing the 8-5 thing. Some units will make you PT with them, so your day actually starts at 0530-0600 even though you dont start work until 8 or so. Usually if you're doing ward (shift) nursing they might have a special PT program for you and others who share your work schedule.

    Don't be fooled though. Enlisted LPNs get stationed anywhere. Not just hospitals. They can get stuck doing something totally non-nursing related for months on end... Like inventoring milvans and connexes. Also, theres always the Motor Pool! MmHmm. Trust me, it has happened. It happened to me. You're going to be a soldier first, nurse second. Although LPNs do have a higher chance of getting into a position where their skills are put to good use, it is not guaranteed. Just want to warn you.

    My job duties? OK, well I have worked on a ward doing inpatient duties as well as outpatient clinic stuff. So its hard to say what my duties are exactly. Be prepared that as a military LPN you're scope of practice will be higher than those of civilians. In the field (for ex: Combat Support Hospital) we are mainly put in ICUs. In a field environment (downrange) there is no JCAHO. Haha. I have not been deployed yet, but about all of the people I graduated with have. Even in regular mil hospitals you'll find yourself being able to do more things than a civ hosp. I've never worked in a civ hospital so I can't really compare. But I've read a lot of posts from LPNs here and it would seem to me that Mil Hosps are more lenient with that sort of thing.

    You will need to get your EMT-B and finish Whiskey school right? You will learn loads there I'm sure. Sometimes I wonder if these people want me to be a medic or a nurse. We have to do biannual training to keep our medic qualifications up to date as well as our nurse qualifications. One time, it had been a year since I did a "assess a combat casualty" with DCAP-BTLS and the medic sergeant jumped down my throat. I was doing it all wrong! I'm sorry, I said, I have been in nursing school for a year and a half..doing bedside oriented stuff not combat stuff. But still...gotta be ready at all times for anything, right?

    A lot of times I get some flak for being a jr enlisted LPN, because I wear a shield on my chest instead of bars. People will automatically assume I dont know what the hell I'm talking about and want to speak with a "real nurse" haha. Like I'm pretending I'm a nurse. I have gotten that a lot. People think that only officers/civilians can be nurses. Haha. OK I say and I get them an officer or a civilian LPN so they can ask them some lame question.

    There is a enlisted LPN conundrum. I dont want to go into it right now..but you will have to see what I am talking about. Its kinda like you're torn between two worlds. That of nursing, and that of being a soldier. Its definitely a conundrum. But nothing that you wont be able to live with.

    Uniforms? Depends where you work! Sometimes scrubs, sometimes its the Army issued white scrubs, sometimes its ACUs. Depends on what dept you're in and how much of a "messy factor" it has. Unless you work in Peds or something, the cutesy scrubs have to go.

    Lessee, time to go RN. Yes. Depends on how hard you work it. There are programs in place for individuals who have all the pre-reqs to go to a BSN school of their choice for free and get paid while doing so. (how sweet is that?) However, there are stipulations for that. You will have to do your own research on that. Most likely if you decide not to go that route you will only be able to knock out a few classes here and there. Unfortunately, an Army career isn't conducive to getting a nursing degree. Other career plans yes, nursing not so much. I have been in the process of knocking out a few classes myself and that is all I can do being out of the country.

    Hopefully I have answered some of your questions. I know I had a burning desire for knowledge of all things LPN/military related before I joined and I hope I gave you a good jist. Don't let me jade you though. People have completely different experiences in their careers. SO what else can I say?
    Yes that answered many of my questions Thank you so much.

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