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Gonna Quit: When Nursing Is Rough...

Nurses Article   (2,898 Views 30 Comments 1,034 Words)
by jeastridge jeastridge (Member) Writer Expert Nurse

86 Likes; 5 Followers; 86 Articles; 145,763 Visitors; 378 Posts

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The author presents some of the current issues in today's nursing profession including nurse/patient ratio, living wages, bureaucracy, positive mentoring, and discusses possible ways to address them. You are reading page 3 of Gonna Quit: When Nursing Is Rough.... If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

86 Likes; 5 Followers; 86 Articles; 145,763 Visitors; 378 Posts

On 1/26/2019 at 1:38 AM, gemmi999 said:

I don't think nursing is a calling. I specifically chose nursing, and then specifically chose ER nursing because it is a steady job, with a good paycheck, that has the ability to get overtime on a regular basis compared to med/surg nursing.  There is always a minimum staff ratio to the ED because you staff based on what could happen, not what is currently in the ED at that specific moment.

I do think a lot of nurses would be better able to handle nursing and the drama/politics/etc that go with nursing if they viewed it as a job and not a calling.  The reason that is important to me is because a job is something that you go to, and leave. A calling implies a lot more, and thus you are less likely to leave the drama/politics/bs behind. 

If the job is not working out, you are free to leave the job. But more importantly you are free to think about what it is about the job that you find unsatisfying.  If it is a calling that is not working you, there is a bigger onus of self blame because it's "your calling" and "if it's not working out I must be doing something wrong".

So, in conclusion: Nursing is a job.  Not all jobs are perfect all the time, but bedside nursing has definite pros. And by thinking of it as a job versus a calling you can remain more detached/leave work drama at work/have a better work/life balance and remain a bedside nurse for (hopefully) longer.

Well said and good points. Thank you for sharing.

 

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86 Likes; 5 Followers; 86 Articles; 145,763 Visitors; 378 Posts

On 1/25/2019 at 12:57 PM, Sindbad123 said:

I have been a nurse for past 7 years. After i graduated i tried to find job in a hospital. At that time most of them were not hiring new grads. I was forced to work in a nursing home for one year. I have been in pediatric home health private duty for past full five years now. I need a change and for that again i tried applying in hospitals. But nope. All i get is "at this time we are perusing other candidates for this position". To me its just became a dream working in an acute care. Its not easy to change your career in nursing. Does anyone have an advice for me. I feel so behind and helpless

I'm sorry you have had a tough time. You might try your local community college placement office (they often provide services free of charge to the whole community not just their students) and maybe brush up on interview techniques and making a better resume. I hope others will have suggestions for you too. Wishing you the best. Stick with it. Sometimes finding a job can be a full time job in and of itself!

 

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Damion Jenkins is a MSN, RN and works as a Nurse Education Consultant, Tutor and Writer.

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On 1/22/2019 at 10:01 AM, jeastridge said:
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It’s complicated…

It is important for all of us to work together to find solutions that fit our situations. With increasing pressures from within and without, hospital administrators daily find themselves in lose-lose situations, working furiously to simply put in place the “less bad” alternative. The answers to our current problems are many are far-reaching, extending from voting to informing our legislators, to speaking with kindness and courtesy to listening carefully. As H. L. Mencken said, “For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong.”

For my friend who found herself upset and angry, a word of encouragement was just what she needed to get through the day and face a new tomorrow. When the going gets rough, we can all be that voice of hope for our co-workers in need.

Joy Eastridge, BSN, RN

THIS!!! Until we nurses (from the bedside to nursing leadership) strive to uplift, support and mentor our own - nursing will always be one of the most undesirable positions in healthcare. The role of the nurse will always be challenging, and therefore requires continual support from our colleagues and leaders.  

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Daisy4RN has 20 years experience.

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On 1/25/2019 at 12:19 PM, kbrn2002 said:

Therein lies the problem, or at least part of it. The myriad of jobs away from the bedside provides zero encouragement to actually stay at the bedside.  Instead of encouraging nurses at all levels of experience to bail out of bedside nursing as soon as possible we need to find ways to make the bedside tolerable so more nurses are willing to seek out and then keep those positions. 

I could not agree more!! There is never enough (if anything) done re: bedside nurse retention. Maybe in days gone by there was a little, but now admin just says if you don't like it there is the door. Bottom line is the almighty dollar and I don't see that changing anytime soon!

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Daisy4RN has 20 years experience.

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14 minutes ago, Damion Jenkins said:

THIS!!! Until we nurses (from the bedside to nursing leadership) strive to uplift, support and mentor our own - nursing will always be one of the most undesirable positions in healthcare. The role of the nurse will always be challenging, and therefore requires continual support from our colleagues and leaders.  

I agree that this would help, but I don't see this alone solving the problems that exist at the bedside. The only way to solve them is a higher nurse to pt ratio with (at least) adequate ancillary staff. The consistently overburdened/overworked nurse is what makes this position undesirable to most.

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1 minute ago, Daisy4RN said:

The only way to solve them is a higher nurse to pt ratio with (at least) adequate ancillary staff. The consistently overburdened/overworked nurse is what makes this position undesirable to most.

I could not agree more. Had I never been overloaded with patients, not enough CNAs, and impossible expectations with no guaranteed break in a 12-hr shift, then I think I would have loved inpatient MedSurg. 

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