Jump to content

Girl Brain Dead after Tonsillectomy

News   (806,269 Views 2,602 Comments)

EaglesWings21 is a ASN, RN and specializes in Medical Surgical.

11,887 Profile Views; 380 Posts

You are reading page 7 of Girl Brain Dead after Tonsillectomy. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

wtbcrna is a MSN, DNP, CRNA and specializes in Anesthesia.

1 Follower; 5,028 Posts; 52,300 Profile Views

The girl won a lawsuit, something about a needle that nicked a nerve or blood vessel, this was years ago. She mostly recovered and is now a checker in a local grocery store, and has two healthy children.

That isn't an anesthesia complication unless the anesthesia provider didn't respond appropriately. Stroke from anesthesia is a very real complication and varies greatly with type of surgery and position of the patient during surgery with the sitting position being one of the highest risk positions for CVA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

775 Posts; 8,668 Profile Views

You all are giving opinions from a medical perspective. Put yourself in the Mother's shoes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Follower; 6,981 Posts; 32,598 Profile Views

.Why?

You all are giving opinions from a medical perspective. Put yourself in the Mother's shoes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BrandonLPN has 5 years experience as a LPN.

3,358 Posts; 35,407 Profile Views

You all are giving opinions from a medical perspective. Put yourself in the Mother's shoes.

It wouldn't change the fact that her daughter is dead or that what she is asking the hospital to do amounts to desecrating a corpse. The poor woman is in denial.

For a healthcare team to approach this from such an emotional, delusional and uninformed perspective would be one of the worst things they could do.

And, once again, shame on the media.

Edited by BrandonLPN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Esme12 is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

5 Followers; 4 Articles; 20,896 Posts; 147,049 Profile Views

You all are giving opinions from a medical perspective. Put yourself in the Mother's shoes.
As a mother it is hard. I would want someone to pay for what they had done, regardless of whether or not there is medical malfeasance.

I would personally need to see a negative cerebral angio and CBF to prove to myself that my baby is gone ( which is unthinkable to me, my brain refuses to go there) and I would remove the life support. I am not sure that I would have their tonsils removed at all...but that is just me. But I would be sure that someone would be held responsible.

We don't know the details...I HAVE to believe that they did everything and that this family is WILDLY CRAZY with grief.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

8,427 Posts; 75,623 Profile Views

You all are giving opinions from a medical perspective. Put yourself in the Mother's shoes.

I have been in a position where I had to make medical decisions; I stand by my response. :yes:

Being objective doesn't erase our feelings of the tragedy; being objective gives rationale and pause that is needed; especially a pause about quality of life...WHY would you want a child, who is brain dead, to endure potential complications-contractures, wounds, etc? Why prolong death???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KelRN215 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pedi.

1 Article; 7,344 Posts; 68,097 Profile Views

You all are giving opinions from a medical perspective. Put yourself in the Mother's shoes.

Ok. I am the mother of a brain dead child on a ventilator. The MDs show me objective data that she is brain dead and I ask them to please salvage her viable organs for donation. She is brought back to the OR where her organs are removed, her vent is turned off and she is at peace.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Julius Seizure specializes in Pediatric Critical Care.

1 Follower; 2,243 Posts; 24,646 Profile Views

You all are giving opinions from a medical perspective. Put yourself in the Mother's shoes.

I have been in a very similar position. My school-aged nephew was declared brain dead after a TBI. I stood at the bedside and nodded my head when my sister and brother-in-law asked me if it was true that he could be brain dead even though he had a heart beat, and spinal reflexes. When everything in me wanted to say that "NO, hes moving when I hold his hand."

I believed then, and I still believe - with all my heart - that my sister (his mother) did the right thing when she chose to have them wait a couple hours for family to gather and say their goodbyes, and then remove the life support, allowing her to hold him and rock him as his body shut down.

Edited by Julius Seizure
added quoted reply

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

113 Posts; 1,890 Profile Views

This is quite scared I had this procedure done at the age of 21 I am 24 now! Wow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wtbcrna is a MSN, DNP, CRNA and specializes in Anesthesia.

1 Follower; 5,028 Posts; 52,300 Profile Views

I tell most of my patients you are more at danger driving to the hospital/surgery center for your operation than the actual anesthesia or operation itself. This is a truly rare event and unless the family decides to make the medical record public it will probably never be known what actually happened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JustBeachyNurse has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics.

1 Follower; 1 Article; 13,944 Posts; 99,964 Profile Views

It wasn't a simple tonsillectomy. She had most of the soft tissue if her pharyngeal area removed including soft palate, tonsils, adenoids, uvula, palatine tonsils, and soft tissue of nasal turbinates removed per court documents for severe, chronic OSA per court documents posted hence the planned multi-day stay and ICU admit. Only people stating "simple tonsillectomy" are the family. The independent pedi neuro physician from Stamford Children's has declared her brain dead based upon cerebral & brain stem blood flow studies, EEG, apnea tests and other standard medical tests. Family is still in denial

But remember for families perception is reality. There were reportedly multiple transfusions of blood products. A 30 second delay while a nurse gets more supplies can feel like minutes or hours when panic sets in. She went into cardiac arrest but no one states for certain it's due to hemorrhage or hypovolemia. The blood flowing through her body as a result of medications and life support make her feel warm but does not make her alive. The "healing pearls" held by her RN grandmother are not going to fix her.

Chronic OSA that requires such drastic surgery when CPAP often is more successful usually is indicative of more issues than a "healthy child" like pulmonary HTN, cardiomegaly, continued weight gain due to stresses on the body due to multiple apneic episodes during sleep, HTN, cardiac issues, fatigue, deconditioning, low energy, issues with mood lability and others.

It's sad that a 13 year old had such a severe case of chronic OSA that required such complicated and drastic surgery. It's sad that something went wrong whether an unintended complication such as DIC or a surgical or medical oversight/error and this child is now dead (medically & legally). I hope after reflecting over the past few days the family comes to terms with reality and has the strength to let her body go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wtbcrna is a MSN, DNP, CRNA and specializes in Anesthesia.

1 Follower; 5,028 Posts; 52,300 Profile Views

It is called UPPP, turbinoplasty, and T&A. All of these are routine surgeries although a UPPP is usually only done on adults. The risk factors are the same and rarely do you have any bleeding with a UPPP because the surgeon normally uses electrocautery for the entire procedure. None of these procedures were high risk. They were all low risk elective procedures. There is something that went horribly wrong during or after this procedure. Depending on the hospital it can be routine for OSA patients to get 24hr inpatient apnea monitoring, and depending on the hospital that may only be available in the ICU.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×