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Girl Brain Dead after Tonsillectomy

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EaglesWings21 is a ASN, RN and specializes in Medical Surgical.

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You are reading page 215 of Girl Brain Dead after Tonsillectomy. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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Whoops...If you aren't too scarred for life but still curious, you might try to Google his moniker, Doc Bastard. Sorry if you saw anything too frightening (though as a nurse, you've probably seen lots live and in person) :)

No - it was merely the portal inviting you in to take a peek. :whistling:

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No - it was merely the portal inviting you in to take a peek. :whistling:

I found it by googling Doc Bastard Jahi McMath.

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NotReady4PrimeTime has 25 years experience as a RN and specializes in NICU, PICU, PCVICU and peds oncology.

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Here's a slightly different perspective... 'Baby Iver' born healthy, body of mother Robyn Benson dies - British Columbia - CBC News

Robyn Benson suffered a cerebral hemorrhage on December 28th and was 22 weeks pregnant at the time. Her husband was forced to make a decision about maintaining mechanical support for her until the fetus was considered viable. The baby was delivered Monday at 28 weeks and appears to be healthy. Robyn was then removed from mechanical support and her heart stopped beating. What a heart-rending story.

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OCNRN63 is a RN and specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

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Very good point. I certainly understand the euthanasia/assisted suicide folks more now. However that hasn't changed my mind about legalizing it.

I'm a hospice nurse and we are able to help people die without pain and in a peaceful manner.

The hard part of all this is people don't make their wishes known - that's where we need to focus. More education about Advanced Directives and about hospice. I still come across people who are afraid of hospice, thinking it means something it doesn't.

The lack of knowledge, even in healthcare, is scary. I've mentioned this book before but thought I'd link it again for newbies. These nurses were reported by a CNA (who was a friend) for murdering a patient.

No Good Deed: A Story of Medicine, Murder Accusations, and the Debate over How We Die: Lewis Mitchell, M.D. Cohen: 9780061721779: Amazon.com: Books

We do a good job of it, but not everyone has a "good death," that's pain-free and free from other terrible complications r/t terminal illness. In spite of our best efforts, there are people who do suffer. I'm thinking of an ALS patient I had in particular.

It's not for me to judge if a person wants to commit suicide, rather than go through a drawn out death.

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We do a good job of it, but not everyone has a "good death," that's pain-free and free from other terrible complications r/t terminal illness. In spite of our best efforts, there are people who do suffer. I'm thinking of an ALS patient I had in particular.

It's not for me to judge if a person wants to commit suicide, rather than go through a drawn out death.

I agree. I just don't think I should be part of that.

I was going to add some more . . but that should be a separate thread.

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ktwlpn is a LPN, RN and specializes in Med Surg, Homecare, Hospice.

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I agree. I just don't think I should be part of that.

I was going to add some more . . but that should be a separate thread.

And you shouldn't have to be, it's no different then a nurse opposed to abortions. No-one should be forced to take part in any aspect of health care they have morale objections to but where do you draw the line? I abhor tube feeding end stage dementia patients but I have to do it. Where do we draw that line? What happens to the truly reprehensible patients ?(we have had numerous threads about this) Someone has to care for them, should we really have the right to refuse? We can discuss this around and back again forever....

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I need your opinions.

I am not a nurse, although a full third of my family and friends are RNs and NPs.

However, I'm more experienced than are most nonmedical professionals re: medical/end-of-life care, having served as a legal guardian, hospice/home-hospice/VA/eldercare volunteer, hands-on caregiver and HC proxy to my, my wife's and neighbors' terminal, PVS and brain-dead kin ... I know reality, I don't believe in magic and miracles, but I *do* believe that we should treat our fellows with dignity.

And I know what's within norm reactions.

Hence, I was taken aback when an associate tipped me off re: this day-ago dialogue on Jahi's uncle's instagram:

Uncle says he's getting back in shape, since "This is the heaviest I have ever been in my life."

Jahi's mom responds: "you gained Jahi weight cuz she shedded à few pounds lol"

Omari Sealey @iamomari Instagram photos | Webstagram

What??

[Not to mention her earlier response to "are you happy or just comfortable."]

Like many folks, I've tried to be objective and to separate uncle's fame-agenda from mom's trauma. I know that grief/anger can make people crazy. And I know that both sides have heaped their personal biases and therapy issues onto this.

But I can't comprehend flippancy/lol re: a dead (or, fantasizingly, comatose) child's weight loss?

What do you think of this?

Edited by Alexi5
clarifying

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ixchel specializes in critical care.

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A few have mentioned that they think what happens to a body after it's been coded is terrible, I believe someone even said they wouldn't want to survive that. What happens? Does age make a difference?

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Esme12 is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

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A few have mentioned that they think what happens to a body after it's been coded is terrible, I believe someone even said they wouldn't want to survive that. What happens? Does age make a difference?

I think this has been explained multiple times look back to Jan's posts. Of course age makes a difference.

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I need your opinions. I am not a nurse' date=' although a full third of my family and friends are RNs and NPs. However, I'm more experienced than are most nonmedical professionals re: medical/end-of-life care, having served as a legal guardian, hospice/home-hospice/VA/eldercare volunteer, hands-on caregiver and HC proxy to my, my wife's and neighbors' terminal, PVS and brain-dead kin ... I know reality, I don't believe in magic and miracles, but I *do* believe that we should treat our fellows with dignity. And I know what's within norm reactions. Hence, I was taken aback when an associate tipped me off re: this day-ago dialogue on Jahi's uncle's instagram: Uncle says he's getting back in shape, since "This is the heaviest I have ever been in my life." Jahi's mom responds: "you gained Jahi weight cuz she shedded à few pounds lol" Omari Sealey @iamomari Instagram photos | Webstagram What?? [Not to mention her earlier response to "are you happy or just comfortable."] Like many folks, I've tried to be objective and to separate uncle's fame-agenda from mom's trauma. I know that grief/anger can make people crazy. And I know that both sides have heaped their personal biases and therapy issues onto this. But I can't comprehend flippancy/lol re: a dead (or, fantasizingly, comatose) child's weight loss? What do you think of this?

The mom is sick. I can't believe she says that. Jahi is probably so skinny now. And is probably looking so bad.

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Hence, I was taken aback when an associate tipped me off re: this day-ago dialogue on Jahi's uncle's instagram:

Uncle says he's getting back in shape, since "This is the heaviest I have ever been in my life."

Jahi's mom responds: "you gained Jahi weight cuz she shedded à few pounds lol"

What do you think of this?

If Mom is convinced that Jahi is still living, it stands to reason that she might view the weight loss as a positive thing. Maybe?

On a side note: I can only hope that my eventual departure from this world occurs in such a manner as to propel one or more of my uncles into this new realm of ghoulish "fame." Then I will truly live forever.

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ktwlpn is a LPN, RN and specializes in Med Surg, Homecare, Hospice.

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Seeking to curb high costs, U.S. hospitals are known to regularly deport foreign citizens back home, even when they're comatose.

MINNEAPOLIS — The family of an exchange student from Pakistan who has been comatose since a November crash is trying to prevent a Minnesota hospital from sending him back to his home country.

Muhammad Shahzaib Bajwa, 20, was spending a semester in an exchange program at the University of Wisconsin-Superior. On Nov. 13, he and his friends were driving back there from Minneapolis when their car struck a deer, his brother, Shahraiz Bajwa, told The Associated Press on Tuesday.

. Bajwa has been comatose since being injured in a November crash while spending a semester in an exchange program at the University of Wisconsin-Superior.

Shahzaib Bajwa suffered severe facial fractures but was talking when he arrived at a hospital in Cloquet. He choked on blood there and went into cardiac arrest, but was resuscitated and transferred to Essentia Health-St. Mary's Medical Center in Duluth, his brother said.

Related: Fewer deportations big issue for Asians, Hispanics

The anthropology and sociology major suffered brain damage from the heart attack and remains comatose. Though he can open his eyes, squeeze his mother's hand, shrug his shoulders and has some movement in his legs, doctors have told the family it'll take a couple more years to find out how much more the 20-year-old will recover, Shahraiz Bajwa said.

A hospital spokeswoman said Shahzaib Bajwa won't be able to stay in the country legally after his student visa expires Feb. 28. Essentia has pressured the Bajwa family to sign consent forms to return the man to Pakistan, a flight that would take 24 hours, Shahraiz Bajwa said.

"If we take him back to Pakistan this is certainly pushing him toward death," Shahraiz Bajwa said. "We don't want him to die in a miserable condition in a third-world country. It's better if he stays here." >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> From MSN-The mother's comments are most interesting.

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