Since when is it okay to be late ?

  1. I work in a very large SNF. At least 4 of the nurses are chronically late. If anyone says anything to them, they cop an attitude. "I picked up this shift extra". I appreciate that you picked up the shift but you still have to be on time.....give me an older nurse any day...we don't call out, we show up on time and we respect our managers.
  2. Visit CapeCodMermaid profile page

    About CapeCodMermaid, RN

    Joined: Nov '02; Posts: 6,064; Likes: 9,201

    13 Comments

  3. by   TheMoonisMyLantern
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    give me an older nurse any day...we don't call out, we show up on time and we respect our managers.
    With all your knowledge and all your decades of experience, you still make sweeping generalizations about an entire age group of people. Believe it or not, not all of us younger nurses are entitled pieces of scum with no work ethic. I've worked with excellent nurses some older and some younger, I don't really think of age be they young or old as an indicator of competence and anyone who does is woefully ignorant in my opinion.

    I know you've been a long time poster, and I have a lot of respect for your experience but respect is a two way street you weren't born an older nurse after all.
  4. by   Nascar nurse
    CCM - as you know, if someone isn't holding them accountable nothing will change.
  5. by   BiscuitRN
    This happened to me ALL the time when I worked in home health/private duty. It's so frustrating when a nurse comes in late ALL of the time especially if you're in a heavy traffic area. I'm not sure if it's a generational thing because I had nurses of all different ages who did it--but always the same ones who were late. I always get to work 15 minutes earlier than I need to and sit in the parking lot sipping my coffee and listening to the radio.
  6. by   MJLPN727
    I was hired for a 7-3 shift and it's known that my relief nurse comes in at 4 pm. I am usually so busy that I have work to do til 3:30. I don't have other committments at that time and I welcome the extra hours, however, I think if i had been clearly stated to me before I was hired I would feel better about it. I guess we are so short staffed it doesn't matter. But it's tough.
  7. by   Tenebrae
    Never, unless its catastrophic incidents, or life threatening illness

    The work start time is the start time, not an optional suggestion

    Often the ones in our work place that are late are the older nurses
  8. by   CapeCodMermaid
    When 99% of the younger nurses show up late, it is not a 'sweeping generalization'.
  9. by   TheMoonisMyLantern
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    When 99% of the younger nurses show up late, it is not a 'sweeping generalization'.
    As an older nurse you should have learned in your experience that anecdotal data is often the least accurate. I also sincerely doubt that even with your vast experience that you've worked with millions of nurses nationwide and have observed 99% of the younger ones show up late.

    Yes I'm being a smart ass and maybe your thread just hit me the wrong way, but what I'm trying to point out is that your experience no matter how valid it is is localized and cannot speak for the entire population of "younger" nurses nationwide.
  10. by   mtmkjr
    I don't think age has anything to do with tardiness.
    Certain people have a problem being late, everywhere, all the time.
    However...if it is tolerated in the workplace, you have a management issue.
  11. by   Susie2310
    Quote from TheMoonisMyLantern
    As an older nurse you should have learned in your experience that anecdotal data is often the least accurate.
    As far as anecdotal data being reliable; it really depends on the situation and the people involved. For example, why wouldn't CapeCodMermaid (who is a Director of Nursing if I recall correctly), know who the employees are that habitually show up late for work and be able to determine if they are younger or older workers, as he/she did - 99% are younger workers? It's not necessary to conduct a study to determine this; he/she probably sees this with his/her own eyes daily. Also, keep in mind that statistical data only applies to large populations.
    Last edit by Susie2310 on Sep 21
  12. by   TheMoonisMyLantern
    Quote from Susie2310
    As far as anecdotal data being reliable; it really depends on the situation and the people involved. For example, why wouldn't CapeCodMermaid (who is a Director of Nursing if I recall correctly), know who the employees are that habitually show up late for work and be able to determine if they are younger or older workers, as he/she did - 99% are younger workers? It's not necessary to conduct a study to determine this; he/she probably sees this with his/her own eyes daily. Also, keep in mind that statistical data only applies to large populations.
    You certainly have a point and I do agree with you. However, I don't believe the OP is inferring that this generalization is applicable only at her place of employment, I interpreted that this is how she feels in general towards the younger generations everywhere. I could be wrong, but that's how I took it.
  13. by   CapeCodMermaid
    I am speaking about the nurses in MY building. I'm not doing a scholarly treatise. And, I am no longer a DNS....15 years of being on call 24/7 and being responsible for everything was more than enough for me.
    I get to work on time. The nurses in their 30's and 40's get to work on time. Some have small kids...if we all can get there on time, there really is no excuse for the lateness of the younger ones.
  14. by   FeliciaRNCPN
    The chronically late nurses drive me nuts! Especially when they arrive with starbucks or dunckin donuts.

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