I got people fired where I work, and now hate my job - page 4

I ran into a situation in December that involved abuse (emotional) against an elderly resident, involving 2 nurses and 4 cna's, I was not presnt whaen the abuse happened, but was told about it by a... Read More

  1. by   Cyndi_1985
    Quote from shannieliz
    I ran into a situation in December that involved abuse (emotional) against an elderly resident, involving 2 nurses and 4 cna's, I was not presnt whaen the abuse happened, but was told about it by a nurse and cna, I decided that I would tell my DON. Partly to help the poor lady that was being abused and partly to save my job, I knew if they found out that I knew I would loose my job. Consquently they all got fired, and word got out "somehow" that I told on them, I live in a small town, there are only 2 nursing homes in my town, not many places to work, I'm sure that the whole town knows it was me. I know that I did the right thing, but am having some major guilt because the two nurses involved were good nurses and my friends. I have not spoken with the DON, ADON or Administrator since everything happened (5 months ago) I work third shift and rarely see them, but when I have seen them, I feel as though they are ignoring me, or are ashamed of me somehow, and I am really not enjoying my job at all right now, I actually have heard rumors to "watch my back, and watch what I say to anyone" and third shift has gotten in "trouble" and been "nit picked" upon since this happened. I am a good nurse and do my job very well, although I am worried that there is a "WITCH HUNT" and I am the next target, believe me this type of thing happens all the time in my facility, everyone knows who is gonna be fired before they are fired. so, I guess I'm wondering if this has happened to anyone else, or am I just being paranoid?? Please help.
    I too am going through the same thing, I just posted it. I am sorry this has happened to you, small town, night shift,, all the same, I too was told Don't mess with the CNA's,, well I am The Charge Nurse and I will not hear a CNA abuse a patient and let it go,, but then your the dog for saying something,, I can't go anywhere else to work,, I would have to be at least 60 miles away from home, I am a single Mom with 2 Teens I leave, and work 12 to 14 hour shifts, 3 to 4 days a week,, I do not know how the facility could get away with protecting CNA's over Nurses. They let them run us. The witness that also heard the abuse was a real good CNA, and she verified every word I wrote down,, but yet the DON told the CNA that was abusing the patient just to write down her side of the story, {her side of the story is: SHE ABUSED A PATIENT} and not the firdst time,, she has been reported many times. I am lost for words, and don't enjoy going to work since this happened, I worked hard for my degree, I am supporting my family, so Yes, I am going through the same thing. I mopved to this State from New York,, this would not happen there. That CNA would be gone, and CNA's are taught to respect the Nurse in Charge, not tell her what to do. Again, I am sorry you are experiencing the same problem.
  2. by   achot chavi
    I think next time we have to have hidden cameras on us before we report.
    We have a no smoking policy in the facility which was not enforced ( the adm looked away) and when I started working I began enforcing it despite the threats that i am making enemies. It took hold and we are now really smoke free except our medical director, cook and once social worker who smoke freely. We had a CNA who would smoke while caring for the pt- literally cigarette in the mouth as he did a transfer, He also worked cleaning our Asst Adm home ( an ethical issue if I ever heard of one). My boss (DON) reported him smoking, got zero backing and it was her word vs his, so no reprimand. He was mocking her and killed whatever authority she had.
    Some CNA's are like the mafia- protected,
    We can focus on the good that we do for the patients and accept the fact that we cant change adm. who protect the bad apples at the expense of the pts and try to find a way around them or we can bail.
    Good Luck.
    BTW politics like this exists in the hospitals, clinics, and almost every other work place outside of nursing as well. It is not a perfect world we live in, But I empathize with you.
  3. by   Vito Andolini
    Quote from shannieliz
    I put nin my post that I partly did it to protect the pt, and to protect my job, when it comes to abuse you are obligated by law to report it, suspected or real. I could have lost my job and my license by not reporting, it would be the same as if I abused the resident myself.
    But how would anyone know that you knew but didn't report?

    In the future, just keep your mouth shut if you were not the primary witness. Your job was not at stake, I don't think, if you had no first hand knowledge of whatever these other people were allegedly saying or doing.
  4. by   Vito Andolini
    Quote from nursel56
    So, it was the participants in the abuse themselves who reported to you in an effort to throw each other under the bus? Guess that plan didn't work out too well for them

    That wasn't really clear in the first post. Under the circumstances I don't see that you had any choice in the matter. You did the right thing. Hope you're starting to feel better about it.
    She had the choice to not report. The one who talked to her would likely not have thought to say, "Oh, I told her" while she was being terminated.

    I agree that she did the morally and probably legally right thing but it stinks that she is suffering for trying to advocate for patients and support her family.
  5. by   Vito Andolini
    Quote from bellarubia18
    the biggest mistake you made is that you reported something that you heard and didn't know of for a fact....even rumor mills cost people their jobs.

    you also didn't do it to protect the patient...you did it to save your own job...so my question to you is: why was your job at risk to start with? she did it for both reasons. read her post to see why she feared her job was at risk.

    i would never, ever go to a boss unless it was something i witnessed personally, because you never know what kind of toxic poison someone else is spilling out of their lips.

    i don't know how old you are, but i would wager you are pretty young.

    no need to bring age into it. it's not just younger people who dislike that others talk behind their backs. i also think that these people would not have been fired unless there was follow-up done and it was found out to be true. the nurse had a legal obligation to tell someone, and it was to go higher up.
    who wants to remain friends with people who would emotionally abuse an elderly woman anyway?
    it's pretty darned lonely to have no friends on the job.
  6. by   nursel56
    Quote from Vito Andolini
    But how would anyone know that you knew but didn't report?

    In the future, just keep your mouth shut if you were not the primary witness. Your job was not at stake, I don't think, if you had no first hand knowledge of whatever these other people were allegedly saying or doing.

    Perhaps you can sleep well at night without worrying whether the outgoing nurse would try to take you down with her. It's quite common for a fired employee (especially one who would abuse a resident) to create as much havoc as possible on their way out. Search "escorted to the door by security". Regardless, that's not really the point.

    Through reading this thread and others similar, it seems like there's a really toxic culture in some facilities. I did assume that shannieliz was in a supervisory position, which imposes a greater accountability on her part. Either way, when someone compares a cna-don relationship to a protection racket, and others agree, I am missing something. I don't work in an LTC facility. I'll refrain from commenting any further.

    CapeCodMermaid and Moogie: Thanks for your posts. Hope my family ends up in a facility with people like you in charge.
  7. by   achot chavi
    Quote from Vito Andolini
    But how would anyone know that you knew but didn't report?

    In the future, just keep your mouth shut if you were not the primary witness. Your job was not at stake, I don't think, if you had no first hand knowledge of whatever these other people were allegedly saying or doing.
    Because some of us are honest and believe that we are obligated to report ( the law requires it). As previously stated, we report it as third hand, admitting that we did not witness it first hand. and then it is up to management to investigate and uncover the truth,

    If there actually is abuse and we stood quiet, the pt suffers, and then we all suffer.
    Better to err on the side of the pt. Imagine your mother being the patient!!!
  8. by   shannieliz
    The only thing that you can hope for in this situation is that someone else will hear her, and she will be fired. It has been my experience that people like that eventually weed themselves out. I would keep a close eye on her when you are working with her, and if possible do not assign her to care for this same elderly woman. If you hear her being abusive, send her a** home! Maybe after being send home repeatedly they may recognize that there is a problem!! Good luck, you did the right thing
  9. by   browen02
    Sorry to here of your situation. I was let go from a nursing home because my med pass was too long; too long because I would not crush enteric coated or extended release pills. That made med pass more time consuming. I also would not give meds to patients without their ID bands on; I was new and did not know all the residents that well. Also, circled meds that patients would not cooperate with such as eye gtts. Other nurses just signed like they actually gave the eye gtts. I guess best practice is not well liked by administration!
  10. by   PammyRN,CEN
    You should REFUSE to take any responsibility for the firings. You did the right thing! It will all blow over but it will take time. Hold your head high, do a good job and keep a low profile. Do not gossip and steer clear of those that partake in gossip. Sounds to me like a few more need to hit the door and they probably will. It would be easy for you to run the other way, BUT DON"T! Hang in there it does get better. I lived through it, state came in and the girl who initially reported the abuse to me told the investigator right in front of me that she didn't say such a thing!! GRRRRRRRRRR From then on When someone starts to open their mouth to me I say stop, shut your lips and come with me, I take them to the supervisor or DON or call the DON. I make them give it right straight to them. BUT now I am the DON so that plan won't work for me any more. I just wanted you to know it does get easier. Stay.. keep that job. They would like to run you off... I outlasted all the ones at the place I used to work. I have a duty to protect my patients. One of the aides slapped a resident in the mouth and busted her lip, she told me she nicked her shaving her, another aide came and told me she slapped her in the mouth, then lied to the state during the investigation. The one girl threatened the other girl... so she recanted her story. But in my heart I know it did happen! How sad! You hang in there!!!!!!
  11. by   tewdles
    Pt advocacy is sometimes a lonely place!

    Anyone who has advocated for a patient based upon some misdeed of another professional will always have concern for how that action may affect their employment. Nurses may be saints (kidding) but we are also humans with a hierarchy of need.

    The decision to terminate was managements...not yours. The decision to actually abuse the patient was that of the involved parties...not yours. You did what your professional conscience told you to do and I, for one, will not second guess it. You are there and I am not.

    Going forward, be cautious of workplace gossip...it is a fickle lover.
  12. by   nursel56
    [QUOTE=PammyRN,CEN;4059858]You should REFUSE to take any responsibility for the firings. You did the right thing! It will all blow over but it will take time. Hold your head high, do a good job and keep a low profile. Do not gossip and steer clear of those that partake in gossip. Sounds to me like a few more need to hit the door and they probably will. It would be easy for you to run the other way, BUT DON"T! Hang in there it does get better. I lived through it, state came in and the girl who initially reported the abuse to me told the investigator right in front of me that she didn't say such a thing!! GRRRRRRRRRR From then on When someone starts to open their mouth to me I say stop, shut your lips and come with me, I take them to the supervisor or DON or call the DON. I make them give it right straight to them. BUT now I am the DON so that plan won't work for me any more. I just wanted you to know it does get easier. Stay.. keep that job. They would like to run you off... I outlasted all the ones at the place I used to work. I have a duty to protect my patients. One of the aides slapped a resident in the mouth and busted her lip, she told me she nicked her shaving her, another aide came and told me she slapped her in the mouth, then lied to the state during the investigation. The one girl threatened the other girl... so she recanted her story. But in my heart I know it did happen! How sad! You hang in there!!!!!![/QUOTE]


    Thank you so much for holding up the highest possible standards for the safety of your residents. :heartbeat When we read story after story of abuse, neglect and management looking the other way or firing the whistleblower, it is really discouraging.
  13. by   dgonzal883
    it disappoints me when i hear about nurses valuing popularity in the workplace over a patient's/resident's well being. you absolutely did the right thing. personally i would rather have a few co-workers animosity than harm to the resident on my conscience..i would find a new job though...if the DON seems to be acting differently towards you because of it i dont think i would want to work in a place run by someone like that..

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