Can any one tell me how I can get a DON or ADON or MDS cord. Job

  1. I have worked the floor for 24 years and would like to change to either DON, MDS or ADON. can any one give me some hints on how I can do this. I really would appreciate any help.
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  2. Visit Malt123 profile page

    About Malt123

    Joined: Mar '04; Posts: 142; Likes: 9

    21 Comments

  3. by   steff_rn1
    My first suggestion would be to develop a resume that focuses on your skills that would be useful in these positions (assessment, supervision of staff, and knowledge of nursing standards and regulations). Send your resume to all of the LTC's in your area. You could also spread the word that you are interested in one of these positions. You also might consider applying for an RN supervisor job. Since turnover is common in nursing homes, it is possible to "move up the ladder". I started as a supervisor, and in less than two years moved to ADON and then DON. Good luck! Focus on selling your experience and networking.
  4. by   CapeCodMermaid
    Are you just looking to get off the floor? There is a huge difference between the MDS coordinator's job and that of an ADON or DON.
  5. by   Malt123
    After 24 years of listening and trying to do the job I would like the opportunity to use my knowledge and experience to do nursing. I worked as a supervisor for 3 months and was able to focus more on what I went to school for. The MDS cordinator would do the same if I were able to actually do the pt assessments.
  6. by   catlady
    Quote from Malt123
    After 24 years of listening and trying to do the job I would like the opportunity to use my knowledge and experience to do nursing. I worked as a supervisor for 3 months and was able to focus more on what I went to school for. The MDS cordinator would do the same if I were able to actually do the pt assessments.
    I am having a hard time understanding what you are saying. What does your last statement mean?

    The best way to move into a management position is to develop the skills that make someone a good manager. Being a good nurse requires a different set of skills than being a good manager. A few of the skills overlap (think Venn diagram), but most are unique.

    For the DNS or ADNS job: What leadership skills do you bring to the table? Can you handle pressure from above and below? How do you manage when your bosses tell you you're getting less, and your employees are demanding more? Can you separate your personal feelings from your professional responsibilities? Can you keep your head when everyone around you is losing theirs? Are you willing to pitch in and help your staff when they're in need, knowing you still have 40 or 50 hours of your own work that still has to get done? Do you know when it is appropriate to delegate, and when you need to micromanage? Can you smile when you really want to scream? Can you get your head out of your computer and your reports and your meetings and get out there on the units? When you get out there, is it obvious that you are in charge?

    As far as the MDS job: Have you ever completed an MDS? RAP? Care plan? Do you have a finely honed attention to detail? Ability to track and meet multiple, inflexible deadlines? Mathematical skills to determine the optimum Medicare ARDs? Capacity to get other departments to do their jobs with the same sense of urgency you have? Teaching skills that will improve the accuracy of the MDS/CP documentation? Talent for balancing family demands and patient needs against state regulations and corporate restrictions?

    This is why these jobs are hard to fill and good people are hard to retain.

    Anyway, good luck.
  7. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from malt123
    after 24 years of listening and trying to do the job i would like the opportunity to use my knowledge and experience to do nursing. i worked as a supervisor for 3 months and was able to focus more on what i went to school for. the mds cordinator would do the same if i were able to actually do the pt assessments.
    i'm trying to figure that out too. i see you are a nurse, so what do you mean by 'do nursing'. are you saying that you feel like you are doing the mds coordinators job now?

    you certainly have the years behind you, but not the degree of choice for administration. does your experience include more than ltc? i find that to be helpful, clinically speaking. because when a pt. goes bad, acute care experience comes in handy. i know where i sup, they are not as particular about the degree (actually, they take what they can get ) .

    you worked as a sup. for 3 months, then what? i would imagine (although maybe not) that you would have to work your way to the top. i am doing house supervision in a peds snf, and it's giving me a glimpse into the other side, and what i may 9or may not) like to do.
    Last edit by ProfRN4 on Jan 3, '05
  8. by   renerian
    I am guessing she means to take more of a leadership role. I understand that and agree a previous poster listed that the skills are quite different. I think one thing is those types of jobs are usually salaried and are subject to working longer hours which is hard for alot of people to deal with. Uncompensated time so to speak.


    Have you taken any management courses? Do you want to stay where you are or go elsewhere?

    renerian
  9. by   stbernardclub
    I have seen other nurses try DON positioins and ADON , and I hope you have better luck at it.
  10. by   stbernardclub
    PS..... Maybe you should think of doing Homecare. This is a area where your years of knowledge would be invaluable, and you would probably love to run your own schedule for once....
    Quote from Malt123
    I have worked the floor for 24 years and would like to change to either DON, MDS or ADON. can any one give me some hints on how I can do this. I really would appreciate any help.
  11. by   snowfreeze
    MALT, bid on or apply for a supervisors position. If you like that then work your way up the administrative ladder.
  12. by   Malt123
    I owned and operated a Family care home x 4 years, worked on med surge, geriatrics, did care planning, did MDS and rap sheets as a nurse, did inservices. I agree I would need some management coarses and budgeting classes. whatever I need to know I can learn. I loved having the Family Care Home, total responsibilty from meal planning to marketing. My kids are grown and my husband died over 30 years ago.
  13. by   Malt123
    I also worked at a retirement community in their home health, assissted living and the skilled unit. before the days of the MDS cord. guess who did the MDS, the nurse. most MDS cords. are just copying what the nurse is writing, that is why I would want to do my own assessments. This MDS. cord. at one facility I worked told the LPN to just copy what the day shift wrote so his paper work would all be the same. one of the reasons I had problems getting my charting done was because I was out on the floor or doing what the agancy nurse didn't do.
  14. by   TowannaG
    You already have plenty of experience to be an MDS Coordinator. I would call around to all the LTC facilities in my area and inquire about the need for a MDS Coordinator and those needing one I would send my resume. I am an MDS Coordinator and I have found that many facilities are in need of good MDS Coordinators and would grab you up in a minute. I don't think you will have any problems getting a job in LTC for the position that you inquired about MDS Coordinator, ADON, or DON. Goodluck
    Towanna RN

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