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George Mason Accelerated BSN 2009

Virginia   (27,489 Views 104 Comments)
by vwde vwde (Member)

vwde specializes in Psych, Stepdown, Research.

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You are reading page 6 of George Mason Accelerated BSN 2009. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

758 Visitors; 18 Posts

I also got into the accelerated BSN program. Now I'm just wishing GMU had been more informative about what their program is like, their Info sessions weren't very helpful.

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617 Visitors; 6 Posts

I know what you mean mew56...I am currently living out of the country so I'm waiting for my family to email me the documents we received in the mail. Did the acceptance package say anything about registering for classes? Do you know if we are required to attend the transfer orientation or just the nursing orientation the week before classes start?

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758 Visitors; 18 Posts

What comes in the mail is definitely not a packet. I guess they want to make sure who wants to attend before they send much info.

I doubt you have to take the transfer orientation, I think that is mostly just for your benefit for learning the campus better.

You receive 3 pages.

1st - Congratulations you're in. Also students will be required to attend the intro to nursing fundamentals class. Course work will begin promptly at 8am on Monday August 23. The classes are mandatory and must be completed in order to begin the clinical courses.

2nd - Is your admissions contract that you will accept or decline.

3rd - Summary of the estimated fees for newly admitted BSN Nursing Students, which is $542.

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758 Visitors; 18 Posts

If there are any current or past Accelerated nursing school students (or even someone who knows a person) that could give some insight what day to day life is like in the program, I'd really appreciate it! I heard its 7 to 7, but I'm not sure if that is true.

I'd also like to know how writing intensive the program is, and if there are many big projects like presentations + long papers.

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Pixie.RN has 18 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

6 Followers; 32 Articles; 126,718 Visitors; 12,986 Posts

One of my coworkers looked into it, and they told her they highly recommended a person doesn't work during the program, so she wasn't able to do it (single mom, two kids to support). I hear it is pretty intense and time-consuming.

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1,483 Visitors; 18 Posts

Hi guys, I'm in the program now, so I can try to answer a few of your questions, although they supposedly make changes each year, so I can't promise things will be the same for you guys.

First semester, you take a LOT of credits, it's stressful and I think it would be difficult to work during this time. Several people in the program who have worked as nurse tech's or had some part time job before the program were able to work every once in awhile, picking up shifts. But unless you have a flexible boss I'd say it would be hard. Some people work a full "part-time" job (~20 hrs) but I honestly don't know how they do -- I think their grades may suffer and I know they are exhausted and stressed out.

Second semester is a little lighter, but I still think it would be hard to have a regular job.

First semester we had classes three days a week, from 7:30 to around 3 or 4. All of our classes start at 7:30 except for one class this semester, so definitely prepare yourself for that start time. We had clinical (on a medical-surgical unit) one day a week which is from 6:30-3ish. Most of us were at Inova facilities for that clinical. We had one day "off" a week. It was great to have the day to schedule doctor's appointments, do the grocery shopping, etc, but there is so much to do and so much sleep to catch up on, I would not recommend trying to work that one day off.

There is a two week January "term" where you take Community Health. Our class was actually online so we met once the first week and once the second week for tests.

Then the spring semester, you have clinical 2 days a week (again 6:30-3ish, but it varies slightly depending on where you are placed which could be anywhere). This semester you have 3 different clinicals, each for 5 weeks (2 days/wk) -- psychiatry, maternal/child, and pediatrics. Your peds clinical will likely be at Georgetown or Children's Hosp, both in DC. Most of the other clinicals were around the inova fairfax area.

We are wrapping up the spring classes now. We start the summer with a week of lab time and then go into our preceptorship for five weeks -- the preceptorship is basically an internship where we work the same 3x12 hr shifts/wk with an assigned nurse at one of the area hospitals. You will work whatever hours they are scheduled, so this may include nights and weekends and will be 12 hr days. I still don't know where I am going so I don't have much more information on that.

The last part of the summer (the last 5 weeks), we have clinical on Tuesdays and Thursdays (6:30-3 again??) -- this is your community health clinical. We will be placed all over the area and don't know our spots yet.

You don't have any say over your schedule/clinical locations in the fall and spring, but you can let the program know if you want to be carpooling with anyone so they will put you together. No hurry on letting them know, though.

We gave a list of preferences for our preceptorship and community health clinicals this semester but I"m not sure how well that will work out. You don't need to worry about that yet.

Registration will take place in August when you come to campus. Don't worry about it, they will let you know when you need to do it.

As for the classes/presentations/projects, most of the classes have at least one project or presentation and I think most people do well on them. Sometimes they are group, sometimes individual assignments. All of the tests are multiple choice in NCLEX style and they are much more difficult than a regular multiple choice question, so the tests do require a lot of studying -- especially for your 319 pathophysiology class (which includes pediatrics, OB & psych) in the fall and for your 419/adult pathophysiology and 334/pharmacology classes in the spring.

Communication and organization are not always what I'd like them to be with this program so if you're Type A like me, just take a deep breathe and be prepared to not always know things in advance.

Ok, I've procrastinated on studying for my exam long enough -- hope this information was helpful!!

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1,483 Visitors; 18 Posts

Oh I meant to mention that you do not have classes during the preceptorship period in the summer, but you do have a class during the last part of the summer when you are in your Community Health clinical. We are done on August 6th!!!! :)

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758 Visitors; 18 Posts

Wow, julesjmf, I wasn't even hoping for such a thoroughly written answer so that is awesome you took the time to write that all out. I greatly appreciate it!

The 4 days a week sounds great, I was afraid I wouldn't be able to take care of everyday life tasks.

If I could ask you a couple more questions that would be great. I was wondering how you like the professors. And if there is anything I could study during the summer to start preparing for fall.

Also, one of the things I am concerned about is how this program is 12 months when most accelerated are more often 15 months. I know you haven't finished the program yet, but do you feel like you will be prepared when you graduate?

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758 Visitors; 18 Posts

I almost forgot. What color are the scrubs? I'm -really- hoping its not the white pants. And is there any dress codes for clinical in terms of shoes having to be a certain color.

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vwde specializes in Psych, Stepdown, Research.

2,238 Visitors; 87 Posts

Julesjmf and I are in the program together...

The scrubs are hunter green top and khaki bottoms, though I heard there's a chance they'll change back to white bottoms so don't run out and buy anything yet. The shoes are white - no sneakers, holes or emblems. Again, all of the info julesjmf and I have is current but they are likely to make some changes so don't set anything in stone yet.

As for being well-prepared nurses, we have all asked the exact same question. Stay tuned for the answer. I figure we're not going to know what we don't know (or how we haven't been prepared) until we get jobs and can compare our preparation to other programs.

Lastly, I know jules recommends you don't work. I strongly second that. This program can really overwhelm you if you don't have good time management and don't read ALOT and study ALOT. There are 'A' students who are no longer 'A' students in this program. That's not to scare anyone, just to enlighten. It can definitely be done.

My best advice: since you asked what you could do this summer, volunteer/work at a hospital!!! That's the common theme I've seen. The more medical experience you've had (even hearing terms, seeing things, etc.), the better off you'd be in almost every class. Also, read, read, read. Don't take shortcuts. This program really (no one will tell you this) relies on you to teach yourself a lot. There's simply not enough time to teach you everything you need to know. You have to be proactive and read the assigned readings on your own. Believe me, that day off will become a day of reading/studying. Try and get all social/personal/occupational obligations out of the way this summer. You're going to want all that time for yourself during this year.

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