where & what to do!!

  1. I'll be graduating with a BS degree in Health promotion from a UW (wisconsin) university in May. I'm considering going on to nursing school....I'm not sure if I should go for a RN or BSN. I know I have to my own research these topics, but I was wondering if any one knew about transfering credits. I've taken chem, human phys, math 100 and a 300 level stats course, anatomy, exercise phys, and a bio class.......I wonder how long a BSN would take to complete considering some of these classes transfer........
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    About rgrah420

    Joined: Feb '05; Posts: 12

    4 Comments

  3. by   AnnaN5
    Quote from rgrah420
    I'll be graduating with a BS degree in Health promotion from a UW (wisconsin) university in May. I'm considering going on to nursing school....I'm not sure if I should go for a RN or BSN. I know I have to my own research these topics, but I was wondering if any one knew about transfering credits. I've taken chem, human phys, math 100 and a 300 level stats course, anatomy, exercise phys, and a bio class.......I wonder how long a BSN would take to complete considering some of these classes transfer........
    I am in the same situation you are - I got my BS in Human Biology this past summer and want to go to nursing school. There are programs called Accelerated or Second Degree BSN programs designed for people that have a previous BS/BS degree and want to pursue nursing. They are usually 12-18 months in length and at the end of that time you have your BSN. Here is a list of these types of programs: http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Education/pdf/APLIST.PDF It looks like there are 4 of them in Wisconsin - 2 of them being at UW Milwaukee & Oshkosh. These programs are appealing to me because they transfer most of your previous credits and put you right into the nursing courses. Each one has different admission requirements so you would want to check each school out. The downside is that they are usually expensive & require you to carry around 18 credits each semester so they are very challenging. All of the programs I have researched recommend you do not work even part-time during the program.

    On the other hand there are many ASN programs at community colleges that are usually much cheaper and not so fast paced. Eventhough you have a BSN you would still have to go 4 semesters once you are admitted into the program since most programs I have looked into spread the nursing courses out over 4 semesters. The downside to these programs is after 2 years you would have your ASN and it would take another 1-2 years to complete your BSN. Since nursing is becoming so popular many community colleges have long waiting lists or many people apply. At the community college I am applying to they had 1200 applications last year & only accept 120 students.

    So that is my point of view on the two. You pretty much just have to get as much information as you can from the schools you are interested in and weigh the pros/cons of each. I am personally applying to the community college to start in the Fall and if I don't get in there then I am going to pursue the Accelerated/Second Degree options.
  4. by   AmyLiz
    If I were you, I'd talk to an academic advisor at the nursing department within your university. He or she should be able to tell you what transfers, etc. It may be easiest for you to stay within UW. I should think a lot would transfer over and you wouldn't have TOO many courses you'd have to take other than your nursing courses and whatever science requirements they have that you haven't taken. You may find that getting your BSN takes about as long as a ADN degree.
  5. by   hllybenn
    If there are accelerated BSN programs in your area- consider that route- like 2nd degree programs- you already have all those credits (not to mention time and money invested in them). The benefit of one degree over another has been and will be debated. I am just offereing you my opinion. I got a RN,BSN in 11 months because of all thoise credits I had- look into accelerated programs. An associates (which I think you are referring to when you say an RN) would have taken me 2 years like anyone else.

    To me, having my BSN is important (just as is my previous Bachelors and Masters)- there may not be any pay difference right now- but there will be a time when it matters (I'm only out 1.5 years).

    HTH
    Holly
  6. by   Tweety
    The BSN probably won't take much longer than the ADN for you. You've got practice all the pre-reqs and coreqs done for the BSN. The nursing part of the BSN shouldn't take you more than 2 years. Go for the BSN! The ADN would probably take 2 years as well. Both will get you the RN in the end, why not have the highest degree you are able to get.

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