WANTED: Nursing student tidbits of advice - page 31

hey guys, I start this fall in my nursing program and Im extremely anxious!!! Im looking for any advice that will help me in school. Whats the thing you can NOT live w/o during nursing school? What... Read More

  1. by   studentinnursing
    bump

    I have a question. I am starting in the Fall, very excited! But nobody has said anything about an entrance exam until I asked . . . . I have asked around the best I can (online classes this semester, so advisors are my only resource) and I am told we have the TEAS but that it's just a baseline? No letter has come stating when to take or what score I need, but is this a regular thing? We have selective admissions; my letter stated you have academically met all requirements, etc., and I had to give my notice of intent when I was accepted. Our school has never said nor does the paperwork say we need to pass the TEAS to get in; once we are accepted by GPA/prereq's completed, we are accepted, is what I was told.

    Anybody been in this situation; are they going to spring the TEAS on us at orientation maybe? And the director said no need to study because it's just reading and math, but I hear the TEAS has lots more than that! I have the pdf for McGraw-Hill, but I am doing summer classes too right now, so I dont' know how much time I should be spending studying this or should I not worry about TEAS since they have not told me anything yet.

    The reason I wonder about a required passing score is I get a different answer with each advisor, but none have said a passing score is required, let alone a %. But one advisor told me not to buy anything til after orientation when I asked about a stethoscope?

    So should I be making time to study for the TEAS now? I have been going over the science portion and now it's getting scary
  2. by   starmickey03
    Quote from studentinnursing
    bump

    I have a question. I am starting in the Fall, very excited! But nobody has said anything about an entrance exam until I asked . . . . I have asked around the best I can (online classes this semester, so advisors are my only resource) and I am told we have the TEAS but that it's just a baseline? No letter has come stating when to take or what score I need, but is this a regular thing? We have selective admissions; my letter stated you have academically met all requirements, etc., and I had to give my notice of intent when I was accepted. Our school has never said nor does the paperwork say we need to pass the TEAS to get in; once we are accepted by GPA/prereq's completed, we are accepted, is what I was told.

    Anybody been in this situation; are they going to spring the TEAS on us at orientation maybe? And the director said no need to study because it's just reading and math, but I hear the TEAS has lots more than that! I have the pdf for McGraw-Hill, but I am doing summer classes too right now, so I dont' know how much time I should be spending studying this or should I not worry about TEAS since they have not told me anything yet.

    The reason I wonder about a required passing score is I get a different answer with each advisor, but none have said a passing score is required, let alone a %. But one advisor told me not to buy anything til after orientation when I asked about a stethoscope?

    So should I be making time to study for the TEAS now? I have been going over the science portion and now it's getting scary
    If they said you dont need to study then you shouldnt worry about it. One of the schools I was accepted to did this exact same thing. After we were accepted they told us that we would have to take the TEAS, but the TEAS was only so they could get a general idea of where everyone was at. Taking the test wont hurt you or your acceptance status. Like they told you, they only want a "baseline"; meaning they want to know the "baseline" everyone is at academically. No need to study. Hope that helped...
  3. by   studentinnursing
    Yes, thank you!
  4. by   cmonkey
    When I start clinicals, I'm going to try an idea I came up with recently. I tend to run hot/cold at random times, and I never quite know what to wear. So instead of wearing a longsleeved shirt under my scrub top (if you're too hot you have to leave, find a room to change in, take it off, store it, put your scrubs back on, blah blah blah), I got a pair of knee-high socks. I'm going to chop the feet off, hem the cut end, and just wear them as sleeves. Then if I get too hot, I can whip them off and just stash them in a pocket. We're supposed to wear our jackets, but if I find I'm too cold even with that, I can pop my sleeves back on and be on my merry way.

    Oh, and I registered for a hooping class because unless there's a grade attached to it, I wouldn't spend any time exercising. I figure an hour a week isn't enough but it's more than I'd get otherwise.
    Last edit by cmonkey on May 30, '10 : Reason: eta
  5. by   AniraP
    Quote from cmonkey
    Oh, and I registered for a hooping class because unless there's a grade attached to it, I wouldn't spend any time exercising.
    Funny , I wish I had a class that gives me grades for doing all the household work while studying. that way some how i'll find time for that too.
  6. by   Serlait
    CMonkey....I applaud you for your creativity, but I'd suggest a trial run before wearing your sleeves to clinical. Make sure the tops of your sleeves doesn't "ride down" while you're working. (Maybe wear them around the house while cleaning or while doing some other vigorous activity) Nothing would be worse (or more embarrassing) than having your sleeves come down while you're assisting with a procedure....especially with your clinical instructor watching. And YIKES, I hate to imagine if they wiggled down during a poo change/clean up.
    I understand exactly what you mean about hot and cold. I decided to wear a lab coat and just shed it when I got too warm. (Just had to remember where I left it usually!!) Let me know how you fare....very interesting idea!
  7. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from cmonkey
    When I start clinicals, I'm going to try an idea I came up with recently. I tend to run hot/cold at random times, and I never quite know what to wear. So instead of wearing a longsleeved shirt under my scrub top (if you're too hot you have to leave, find a room to change in, take it off, store it, put your scrubs back on, blah blah blah), I got a pair of knee-high socks. I'm going to chop the feet off, hem the cut end, and just wear them as sleeves. Then if I get too hot, I can whip them off and just stash them in a pocket. We're supposed to wear our jackets, but if I find I'm too cold even with that, I can pop my sleeves back on and be on my merry way.

    Oh, and I registered for a hooping class because unless there's a grade attached to it, I wouldn't spend any time exercising. I figure an hour a week isn't enough but it's more than I'd get otherwise.
    While I admire your ingenuity, have you tried a really good quality, long sleeve, hiking undershirt? They often call them base layers. I recommend this only because I'm someone who gets warm very easily, and I find these really comfortable under my scrubs. They seem to keep me warm when I'm cold, but don't cause me to overheat. Not sure how, it's a mystery....but they work :-)
  8. by   cmonkey
    Quote from Serlait
    CMonkey....I applaud you for your creativity, but I'd suggest a trial run before wearing your sleeves to clinical. Make sure the tops of your sleeves doesn't "ride down" while you're working. (Maybe wear them around the house while cleaning or while doing some other vigorous activity) Nothing would be worse (or more embarrassing) than having your sleeves come down while you're assisting with a procedure....especially with your clinical instructor watching. And YIKES, I hate to imagine if they wiggled down during a poo change/clean up.
    I understand exactly what you mean about hot and cold. I decided to wear a lab coat and just shed it when I got too warm. (Just had to remember where I left it usually!!) Let me know how you fare....very interesting idea!
    Oh, I'm all about trial runs. I have three kids so everything that seems like a Bright Idea gets at least two trials before I take it out into the world. I may put elastic in the hems.
  9. by   cmonkey
    Quote from CuriousMe
    While I admire your ingenuity, have you tried a really good quality, long sleeve, hiking undershirt? They often call them base layers. I recommend this only because I'm someone who gets warm very easily, and I find these really comfortable under my scrubs. They seem to keep me warm when I'm cold, but don't cause me to overheat. Not sure how, it's a mystery....but they work :-)
    I haven't. I may look into that, though. They must wick well, along with whatever fabric magic they work. We have a lot of hikers around here so I'll ask them. Thanks!
  10. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from cmonkey
    I haven't. I may look into that, though. They must wick well, along with whatever fabric magic they work. We have a lot of hikers around here so I'll ask them. Thanks!
    I like these: REI Midweight Long-Sleeve V-Neck - Women's at REI.com

    although I often get the men's since I like a crew neck better than a v, under my scrubs.

    They're a bit spendy, but I've used the same ones for 3 years now....no pilling, no stretching. They've been well worth the expense.
  11. by   not.done.yet
    Y'all are lucky. We aren't allowed to wear long sleeves under our scrubs. Apparently they have been linked to the MRSA spread in the hospital and there is legislation now to ban them on medical personnel. Understandable, but sucks. Rumor has it that you already can't wear long sleeves for patient care in places in Europe?
  12. by   lovenursing1218
    How I study- I turn my pp/lecture into answer/question format. For any given test I have between 400-600 questions I have memorized.


    You know how they say that you can't "memorize information like you did for A&P" well that's not entirely true. You still need to know the information..., even more so than you did for classes like A&P, you just need to be able to take it one step further with being able to REALLY apply it and not just know simple concepts. I mean if you think about it, it means you just have to REALLLLLLY know the information so you're able to apply it.
    It's not as hard as some say.

    I myself have stuck to this "knowing the lecture content front to back" and have not done a single nclex review question and have done just fine.

    Make one good friend.
    Avoid drama.
    Do not talk badly about teachers/your nursing program in public/with other students. I am ALWAYS ranting to my nursey bestie or my family, etc, but keep out of the nursing school drama. I can't believe when I walk into a classroom and hear a group of girls ******** about the teacher. Grow up and be an adult, y'know?
    Clinicals are not as scary as you might think. I went into the hospital on the first day with not a single day of experience and now, after 3 semesters, I feel like I am genuinely above average in clinical performance.

    I realized the OP posted this about a year ago but I know when I was entering nursing school I obsessively read these boards so maybe it'll help someone else.

    Good luck to all
    It can be done- I graduate this fall and I'm still kinda shocked about it
  13. by   Morgan0429
    Study hard...thats my advice

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