Tattoos in Nursing School - page 3

Hi y'all! I will be a first quarter nursing student next month and wanted to discuss the topic of tattoos while in nursing school. I know many programs have varying views on the revelation of said... Read More

  1. by   BBboy
    So I don't keep up with this thread anymore since I had orientation. No the school isn't that adamant About it, In fact only time I need it covered would be during clinicals (strong handbook trying to scare us off). And thank you rock nurse for the saracastic reply along with the several people that liked it, I will be getting it after all and I will be enjoying it )))
  2. by   MiladyMalarkey
    Just wait, make it a graduation gift to your self, it'll be all the more meaningful.
  3. by   cgambino70
    You can get thin cover sleeves. Thathis what I wear in clinicals and also the hospital I work for. I bought mine on ebay and they have all different colors.
  4. by   db2xs
    BBboy, I'm glad to hear that everything has sorted itself out. I have tattoos on both of my forearms as well as my entire back and wore long sleeves during my rotations in school as per not only nursing school policy but hospital policy as well. No one freaked out about my long sleeves--no one--and nor did anyone freak out if I had to roll up my sleeves to do something. Currently I still wear long sleeves on the unit as a clinical nurse as per hospital policy and again, no one freaks out--no one--even when I have to roll up my sleeves to do something. Showing some occasional ink is not going to kill anyone, but administering the wrong med might.

    I will be honest: Despite the policies of no facial jewelry, no fingernails past the tips of the fingers, I see nose piercings and I can hear the clicking of acrylic nails on keyboards all the time. I am not saying that that is good policy (esp the latter--that is just plain ole unsanitary in a hospital setting). The reason for covering tattoos and not having facial piercings is to appear professional. I get it. I've had my tattoos since I was 18 years old, and I've had to wear long sleeves at work for a grand majority of my professional career. I know you don't want to wear them, but if you can find the correct material that's thin and comfortable enough, then it's not a big deal, really.

    And regarding getting the tattoo, just get it. I am in the process of getting a new tattoo, and it is my business, no one else's. I've known many nurses who haven't covered their tattoos up completely, and no one flips out. Not just at my hospital, but other hospitals as well. And if someone in admin does flip out, then covering up an arm is not difficult. If you had a full facial tattoo, then, well, that's a whole other ballpark.

    I just want to go on a tangent and tell you about something really cool: I once had a temp job working a trade show for pediatricians, and I was passing out some samples of a product. This one man walked up who had a two-toned faux hawk--he was a pediatrician! The coolest doctor I have ever seen in my life!
  5. by   akulahawkRN
    Quote from BBboy
    So I don't keep up with this thread anymore since I had orientation. No the school isn't that adamant About it, In fact only time I need it covered would be during clinicals (strong handbook trying to scare us off). And thank you rock nurse for the saracastic reply along with the several people that liked it, I will be getting it after all and I will be enjoying it )))
    Checking on it is exactly what a LOT of us were advising you to do. I'm glad you did that and now you know the school's position on this subject. Just be aware this could yet be an issue in the future. Just be ready to answer questions about your tattoo, and be ready to offer suggestions about how to keep it covered should a future employer have concerns about it.

    Go forth with an open and inquisitive mind, keep a level head, and don't be afraid to be nosy but nice... Enjoy the new tattoo!
  6. by   BuckyBadgerRN
    Sigh. Either wait until you're done with school or else put this important to you tat somewhere not easily visible. I don't get the dilemma.


    Quote from BBboy
    Hi y'all! I will be a first quarter nursing student next month and wanted to discuss the topic of tattoos while in nursing school. I know many programs have varying views on the revelation of said artwork, as do facilities and hospitals alike. I was planning on getting a forearm tattoo of something that I feel very strongly about (I already have 2 tattoos but they are concealed from the naked eye unless I take my shirt off), however, I received my program's handbook late this Thursday evening and noticed that tattoos must be concealed at all times failure to do so or even breaking business casual dress code will result in an *absence on my clinicals marks, even whilst in class not just clinicals. This obviously is something I have been struggling with in my head as it is truly something I want to adorn my body with but also I have worked tirelessly inside the classroom and outside of it to get where I am. Thankfully my hospital is alright with visible tattoos but if I do end up getting the forearm tattoo what would be some ways that you would conceal said tattoo (options aside from long sleeves because a brother can only wear long sleeves for so many days the next 2 years).
  7. by   BuckyBadgerRN
    Well that escalated quickly. Try dialing it back JUST a bit there, OP...


    Quote from BBboy
    Pretty sure someone saying that my question isn't an issue is kind of rude because it's subjective to each person. I honestly don't care *****, I dont get worked up about things or people that disagree with what I want to do with my life. If you think me calling somebody rude is actually affecting me that's me stating my opinion. Do I think some people are rude in the nursing field? Sure. Have I dealt with getting my butt handed to me everyday back when I was I was working in memory care? Sure. Have I dealt with families and their grief over the death of their loved one on a daily basis? Sure. Do I let it bother me? No, Im in control of how I feel about things and whether or not it'll get to me. I simply just let it go. The only person who I thought was rude was that person who dismissed my own concerns. Am I going to cry about it? No. I voiced my opinion towards theirs in one comment prior and I won't address it further because it simply doesn't matter to me that much. Coming from someone with a BSN already Id assume you'd take a higher road and defer from an attempt at mocking me but I digress
  8. by   Elladora
    Quote from cgambino70
    You can get thin cover sleeves. Thathis what I wear in clinicals and also the hospital I work for. I bought mine on ebay and they have all different colors.
    I have these too. When I was in school, tattoos were allowed both in school and during clinicals. However, the facility I was working at had a strict no visible tattoos policy. You were written up if they showed.
  9. by   windsurfer8
    Why do you want to make your life more difficult in nursing school? Focus on SCHOOL and being professional. Life (and nursing school) are hard enough.....why give the school a hammer and say hit me over the head with this. Make your life EASIER not more difficult. It is like getting to work on time...simple step and no one can have a free shot at you.
  10. by   jojo489
    I'm glad it all worked out for you, OP.

    I just wanted to mention something I didn't really see anyone else mention (I could be wrong, though).

    The healing process for the tattoo. If you are getting it on your forearm, you may want to get it at a time where you won't be in clinical for a few weeks, like before school starts or during a break. I have several tattoos (all have always been covered by normal clothes by my choice) and it took at least 2-3 weeks for them to really heal and close. My only concern (seeing as your school isn't worried about a visible tattoo) would be having an area on my forearm that opens me up for infection. If you're not fully healed up before clinical a start, maybe consider a dressing on it while at clinical for a little while.
  11. by   kevin418

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