Tattoos in Nursing School - page 2

Hi y'all! I will be a first quarter nursing student next month and wanted to discuss the topic of tattoos while in nursing school. I know many programs have varying views on the revelation of said... Read More

  1. by   Hoosier_RN
    No one was rude to you. They answered the question as presented. Its not rude if they don't give the answer you like. What if the school gives an answer that you don't like? Are they going to be labeled rude as well?
  2. by   BBboy
    Pretty sure someone saying that my question isn't an issue is kind of rude because it's subjective to each person. I honestly don't care *****, I dont get worked up about things or people that disagree with what I want to do with my life. If you think me calling somebody rude is actually affecting me that's me stating my opinion. Do I think some people are rude in the nursing field? Sure. Have I dealt with getting my butt handed to me everyday back when I was I was working in memory care? Sure. Have I dealt with families and their grief over the death of their loved one on a daily basis? Sure. Do I let it bother me? No, Im in control of how I feel about things and whether or not it'll get to me. I simply just let it go. The only person who I thought was rude was that person who dismissed my own concerns. Am I going to cry about it? No. I voiced my opinion towards theirs in one comment prior and I won't address it further because it simply doesn't matter to me that much. Coming from someone with a BSN already Id assume you'd take a higher road and defer from an attempt at mocking me but I digress
  3. by   AspiringNurseMW
    Simple matter of priorities. Are you so set on getting a tattoo right now that you'd risk nursing school. There is no room for interpretation.

    So either get a tattoo in another area that's not visible or wait until school is done.
  4. by   Guest12/13/16
    AspiringNurseMW, how is it risking nursing school? Are people who already have tattoos somehow banished from later deciding to go to nursing school?
    It's pretty simple: cover them with sleeves, dressings, or makeup. Why is that so hard?
  5. by   klone
    Quote from jsfarri
    AspiringNurseMW, how is it risking nursing school? Are people who already have tattoos somehow banished from later deciding to go to nursing school?
    It's pretty simple: cover them with sleeves, dressings, or makeup. Why is that so hard?
    Yes, if the tattoos are visible and it goes against the school's policy, they would likely be excluded from that school.

    Makeup....will wash off the first time he scrubs/washes.

    Sleeves....what happens when he has a rotation in the OR, where visible undershirts are not allowed due to infection risk?

    Look, I get it. I have three tats. One of which limits the types of clothing I will ever be able to wear at work because of where it is. I speak from experience.

    If the school says NO VISIBLE TATS and he wants a tat that will be visible, it really is that simple. What is more important: getting that tat now, or going to nursing school?
  6. by   klone
    Quote from BBboy
    Pretty sure someone saying that my question isn't an issue is kind of rude because it's subjective to each person. <snip> Coming from someone with a BSN already Id assume you'd take a higher road and defer from an attempt at mocking me but I digress
    No, it's not subjective, and no, it wasn't rude. What they meant by that statement was simply that if the school requires no visible tattoos, then you wait on the tat or you don't go to that school.

    Nobody is mocking you in this thread.
  7. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from jsfarri
    AspiringNurseMW, how is it risking nursing school? Are people who already have tattoos somehow banished from later deciding to go to nursing school?
    It's pretty simple: cover them with sleeves, dressings, or makeup. Why is that so hard?
    Schools have dress codes, as well as the facilities that provide clinical placements. Many of those dress codes address visible tattoos, many stating that they must be covered. Therefore, a student in violation of the dress code can (and it has happened) be sent home and receive a failure for that clinical day. Long sleeves and bandages may not be permitted due to infection risks. Makeup washes off.

    OP, no one is being rude by stating opinions you disagree with. Policies exist; at this point, you must decide what you are willing to risk by getting a tattoo in a visible place or whether those risks influence you waiting until you have completed school before getting that tattoo.

    I have a tattoo; I made the conscious decision to get it in an area that is easily concealed. Yes, my employer's dress code states that visible tattoos are not allowed. Many employees have been disciplined for not covering their tattoos. I took that into account when I got mine. No, it's not visible to everyone at all times, but that doesn't take away any of the symbolism that I put into it. It still has great personal meaning to me.
  8. by   quiltynurse56
    Many schools have a 'no visible' tat rule and that rule also applies during your clinical time regardless if the facility is okay with them or not. If you are going to get one that will need to be covered up, then that is what you will have to do.

    There is also a similar thing for earrings and rings that many women have to deal with too. We could only have a 1 mm stud in our ears and wedding bands or no rings. Yet, we would go to facilities and there would be all sorts of earring and rings.

    I did not have a tattoo during nursing school and I have one now. If I were in school it would need to be covered up. On my job, it is no big deal.
  9. by   Hoosier_RN
    Quote from BBboy
    Coming from someone with a BSN already Id assume you'd take a higher road and defer from an attempt at mocking me but I digress
    Coming from someone who has been a classroom instructor and clinical instructor, the rules are the rules whether we like them or not. No one mocked you. Only answered your question per information given. Please, lose your attitude. Its not anyone on this sites fault that the particular school you wish to attend has that rule. You posted on a public nursing forum, you're going to get answers that aren't what you want to hear
  10. by   akulahawkRN
    Quote from BBboy
    To the last 2 or 3 posts: thank you. People either don't understand that these artistic expressions do have a lot of meaning to us (in fact both of my tattos are actually nursing related) and they fail to realize the amount of people that have visible tattoos prior to entering their program. I do have orientation this Tuesday so I will be requesting more information during our session, hopefully they are ok with it in class as I could easily deal with covering them up during clinicals. It's just honestly quite eye opening to see the adverse reactions you get from some people on this site when all you do is ask a question. Sure I may have been searching for opinions but there's never a reason to be rude
    Actually, I suspect that a lot of us do understand that tattoos have significant meaning. What we're trying to tell you is that you need to be very careful about getting a tattoo where it will be easily visible because some rotations require short-sleeve uniforms (like the OR) because of infection risks. When you wash your hands for those rotations, if you've got makeup covering the tattoo, because of how far up your arms you must wash, the makeup washes off and the tattoo becomes visible. At that point you'd be in violation of your school's policy and possibly your clinical site's tattoo policy.

    It's a very good thing that you're going to ask about tattoos at your orientation session as that will answer your question. That answer should help you determine whether it's a good idea to get your tattoo now, after you graduate, or even possibly have it done in a slightly different location.

    A classmate of mine had tattoos above his elbow and usually wore a stretch gauze tube bandage to cover it and that was fine. You just have to be careful and knowledgeable when getting tattoos while going to school and working in a more professional healthcare environment.

    Like I said earlier, I'm not opposed to tattoos. Not one bit. Corporations and schools tend to be a bit more conservative in such matters though... be careful and thoughtful while deciding this.
  11. by   Rocknurse
    You gotta love these people that ask for advice and then don't like the answer and get all offended. Here's a great take-away....how about trying this: don't take our advice, get the tattoo, and see how it works out for you. There. Solved. And don't forget to come back and let us know how it all worked out. Have a great day!
  12. by   not2bblue
    I have 7 tattoos, including a full back piece. It means a lot to me because my brother designed the whole thing and did the tattoo (which he does for a living) so I get it. But not one of my tattoos is visible in scrubs. It is just a choice I made as a professional because I do know some hospitals will not hire people with tattoos. The place you work now may be Ok with it, but they may change that rule. Or you may go somewhere else. Is the design exclusively for the forearm, or could you do it on the leg or back, side... anywhere not visible? No one is saying NOT to get a tattoo. We are all saying that knowing it is against the rules and may be a problem when you are looking for work, you have to ask if it is worth doing it right now?
  13. by   SouthernNurse15
    Someone in my class has a forearm tatoo. He uses a sleeve that he pulls on to cover it (just a sleeve, not a full shirt). Maybe see if the school would accept that, since it could fully cover it without making you unbearably hot.

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