Surgeon for an instructor - page 2

Has anyone ever had a surgeon for an instructor and not an RN? He wasn't a very nice guy was he? Mine sure isn't. He asks very difficult questions that make you think "were these covered in the book... Read More

  1. by   AnnieNP
    Yes, my Pathophysiology instructor was an ER MD. It was a wonderful class, he was an amazing instructor.
  2. by   TriciaJ
    For medical terminology I suggest a good medical terminology textbook. Amazon has several, including Medical Terminology for Dummies. I don't think it's a bad idea for any nursing student to learn the roots, prefixes and suffixes. I was a medical transcriptionist before becoming a nurse and that helped me immensely. A lot of new nurses are weak on terminology and just makes the learning curve steeper.

    Acing the terminology would probably win you a few brownie points with Dr. Curmudgeon.
  3. by   Medic/Nurse
    I didn't technically go to nursing school. But, I used to be absolutely OVER THE MOON GIDDY when an MD taught my medic classes or took me (yep me, moi) on clinical service with him.

    I was joyous! And bring on the central lines, art lines and who the heck knows what else I might learn to do. But, I knew I would work my ass off and I better come prepared (oh yeah!) - the payoff? It left me a much better critical thinker and better clinician!

    Rock on!

    Yay the docs that rock education!

  4. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    Quote from Julius Seizure
    I am surprised there isn't good study material in your textbook to help you learn medical terminology. If you still want to supplement, a medical dictionary is a good idea, and I would also recommend the Khan Academy videos. They are great for learning anatomy/physiology as well (and you need to understand normal physiology before learning pathophysiology.) They also have some good patho videos.

    I wish nursing school would have included MORE non-nurse instructors, personally.
    I've been having to do a lot of self-teaching like the difference between an embolus and a thrombus when talking about diseases of the vein like SVCS and DVT.
  5. by   Caprica6
    Quote from Beldar_the_Cenobite
    I've been having to do a lot of self-teaching like the difference between an embolus and a thrombus when talking about diseases of the vein like SVCS and DVT.
    This is what college level learning is about...teaching yourself. The professors are there to facilitate your journey, to guide you. You are responsible for your own learning.

    As others have recommended, medical dictionaries are a good resource, as is YouTube, or the Khan Academy. Your school may also have a tutor if you need one.

    Additionally, learning from other disciplines is imperative. They often bring knowledge and skills that nurses may not have, as well as a unique framework from which to view patient problems. They are also going to be your colleagues, so to work with them pre-employment is a good thing. You are lucky to go to a college that provides a robust learning experience.
  6. by   RNNPICU
    Wow!! That is so cool that you have a surgeon teaching you. especially for pathopysiology. It will help you so much in your nursing career. He is asking you these tough questions because he wants you to learn, he wants you to start to apply what you are learning to actual people. This is a hard transition, and one that is not easy. Realize that he is not trying to launch a personal attack, rather have you really think about how a condition affects a patient.
  7. by   Hoozdo
    I had an MD teach my pathophys class and he was a wonderful instructor. He was the one of the most memorable teacher I had in my life. I don't think it is unusual to have a Dr to teach pathophys. I was impressed that they would take the time and interest to reach out to nursing students.
  8. by   Kooky Korky
    We had the most wonderful teacher of A & P back in the Dark Ages ('70's). He was an MD. He was so knowledgeable, also friendly enough.
    I learned to write really, really fast. Yes, I could have recorded the lectures, but found that writing helped me learn better by involving me more in the whole process. And I could review my written notes.

    Sounds like OP's teacher is knowledgeable, just not personable and friendly.

    OP, start reading the medical dictionary cover to cover. And look up medical terminology, also symbols and abbreviations. You will not regret learning basic things, such as:

    itis = inflammation
    osis = the condition of _________
    a, an = without or the absence of __________
    cephalic = relates to the head
    caudal = relates to the lower part of the body, not the head
    medical asepsis vs. surgical asepsis (look up sepsis and remember that the a before it means "without" or "the absence of"
    Orthopedics = to straighten the child
    anatomical position

    These are just some random examples that came quickly to mind.

    OP, what program do you want to enter?

    Best wishes. Study a lot.
  9. by   nursingboy
    I'm currently taking Microbiology taught by an MD & I am just fascinated by everything he says. He definitely brings the clinical side to the class.
  10. by   Hoosier_RN
    mine was taught by a retired surgeon who became the county coroner. My class got to sit on 2 autopsies per student. It was cool, and I learned so much
  11. by   CityofAngelsRN
    The first off putting sentence is "he wasn't very nice was he?" That's telling us you judge every surgeon based on your experience with one. If you would like us to be more empathetic to your situation, I would suggest giving examples as to how he's mean. Try to look at it in a good way. This is pathophysiology, literally the foundation to everything you will learn. You can't memorize as a nurse, unless it's lab values, you MUST comprehend. The only way to comprehend is to have a strong understanding of pathophysiology. I would feel extremely lucky to have a surgeon teaching me this subject. His knowledge is pure gold. Try supplementing your text with other online texts or watching YouTube videos. I loved the series "made incredibly easy" by Lippincott. I'm sure they have Pathophysiology Made Incredibly Easy. It gives a basic understanding and then you can get details from your text. This class is no joke, it's extremely difficult but you can do it.
  12. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    Quote from CityofAngelsRN
    The first off putting sentence is "he wasn't very nice was he?" That's telling us you judge every surgeon based on your experience with one. If you would like us to be more empathetic to your situation, I would suggest giving examples as to how he's mean. Try to look at it in a good way. This is pathophysiology, literally the foundation to everything you will learn. You can't memorize as a nurse, unless it's lab values, you MUST comprehend. The only way to comprehend is to have a strong understanding of pathophysiology. I would feel extremely lucky to have a surgeon teaching me this subject. His knowledge is pure gold. Try supplementing your text with other online texts or watching YouTube videos. I loved the series "made incredibly easy" by Lippincott. I'm sure they have Pathophysiology Made Incredibly Easy. It gives a basic understanding and then you can get details from your text. This class is no joke, it's extremely difficult but you can do it.
    I have both Lippincott books, made visual and made easy. although I noticed the books will not teach two things at the same time. One teaches hypertension, the other doesn't.
  13. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    A friend of mine in another nursing program that I originally wanted to go into told me that the book we're using in class is the same book they are going to use in Pharmacology. I thought that was weird because there's not much Pharm discussed in this book. She said not to worry about that book and that it will prepare you for pharm.

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