Stupid question about medications and care plans...

  1. Hi all, I'm in my second term of nursing school and have what I'm sure is a really stupid question about my care plan. Last term we were at a rehab center for clinical and we did care plans but none of my patients were on IVs so am unsure how you handle the following: I have a patient at the hospital who is getting NS IV... this isn't really considered a medication is it? In other words I don't put it on my medication sheet and look up all the implications/indications/actions etc.. information right? I'm not finding anything on it in my drug book and I know I could go to my IV manual for help but I'm starting to think it shouldn't even be on my med sheet... Can anyone clarify (and please don't laugh )...
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    About mariedoreen

    Joined: May '04; Posts: 826; Likes: 47
    RN
    Specialty: 3 year(s) of experience in Med-Surg

    5 Comments

  3. by   Altra
    I wouldn't include the NS as a med but would look at where it fits into the nutrition/hydration picture for this pt... s/s of dehydration or evidence of good hydration? Renal assessment - I/O? BP? Dysphagia or some other condition contributing to poor oral intake?

    HTH
  4. by   mariedoreen
    Quote from MLOS
    I wouldn't include the NS as a med but would look at where it fits into the nutrition/hydration picture for this pt... s/s of dehydration or evidence of good hydration? Renal assessment - I/O? BP? Dysphagia or some other condition contributing to poor oral intake?

    HTH
    Thank you, yes it helps!
  5. by   elkpark
    Yes, straight NS is usually considered as a hydration/nutrition intervention rather than a med. However, the real answer to this question is the same as so many others:

    "YOU SHOULD DO IT HOWEVER YOUR INSTRUCTORS WANT YOU TO DO IT" :chuckle ("It," in this case, being including the NS on your med sheet or not ...)

    Probably wouldn't hurt to review the NS info in your IV manual and be prepared to talk about indications/effects/etc. in relation to your patient.
  6. by   wolf_funk
    do u have prescribed fluid charts in the usa? here in the uk we have them thats where they go
  7. by   purplemania
    you need to consider nursing implications for this patient on continuous fluids. Frequent auscultation of breath sounds is in order. What are the sx of fluid overload? Does pt. have condition such as CHF or renal dz that would make them higher risk? I would ask the instructor about how to document IV fluids, but never discount anything going into the patient---everything matters or it would not be ordered.

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