So... How important are grades... really?

  1. I am one of the top students in my class (i'm actually convinced that i have the highest grade average in the class, but i dont know if it is true). when i first started off nursing school, i had a very strong drive to do as well as i could academically. i hadnt been in school for about 3 years since my 5 years at a university. being back in school made me realize how academically inclined i really am. so... in order to graduate my program, i need to maintain above an 85 average (or 75... i dont remember...). in college... i initially tried to do well, until i realized that a diploma was a diploma was a diploma... if ur and lpn/rn, you are an lpn/rn no matter where you graduated from... so i'm wondering... how important could grades possibly be while im in school, as long as i pass above the minimum grade... should i continue studying my *** off and keeping that A average... or glance and my book and just pass...
    to slack or not to slack...
    what difference does this make in acquiring a job?
    aside from advancement in post graduate studies...
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    About nurseyNJNYC

    Joined: Apr '05; Posts: 116; Likes: 19

    26 Comments

  3. by   grinnurse
    IMO you slacking is only going to hurt you in the long run. To me, the more you know, the better you will be when it comes to boards and in your career I would think. I have been mostly A/B student my college career and have a friend who has made B/C and I have had two job offers and she has yet to get a call back from anyone.

    I can only tell you what I have experienced in interviews so far and that when they look at my GPA and the achievements that I have been able to list such as honor society, whose who (even though it's a marketing thing) they have commented positively. I think the A's show dedication and committment to a job well done that would carry over into your career.

    I'll put it like this............Just b/c you know how to do something well at the hospital are you going to slack off there too? Don't be a "slcaker", we have far too many of those as it is in the nursing profession. Hope this doesn't come across as b*****, it's not intended to be that at all. Guess it's just the mommy in me!!
  4. by   Sheri257
    I go through periods of burnout when I think the same thing ... Afterall, this is a relentless grind.

    Then I remember you have to study hard not just for the grade, but you need to learn this stuff to avoid inadvertently killing one of your patients someday ... :uhoh21:

    Let's face it, even with good grades, there's a ton of info you need to learn that might save your patient's life. The more you know, the better.

    So I go for good grades no matter what ... just "passing" doesn't cut it for me.

    Also, one hospital I specifically want to work for definitely looks at grades. Contrary to popular belief, not all facilities hire RN's just because they have a degree.

    Good grades also get you scholarships, loans, teacher recommendations for jobs, etc. And, good grades are required for master's programs like CRNA (if you decide to go that route.)

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 8, '05
  5. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from grinnurse
    IMO you slacking is only going to hurt you in the long run. To me, the more you know, the better you will be when it comes to boards and in your career I would think. I have been mostly A/B student my college career and have a friend who has made B/C and I have had two job offers and she has yet to get a call back from anyone.

    I can only tell you what I have experienced in interviews so far and that when they look at my GPA and the achievements that I have been able to list such as honor society, whose who (even though it's a marketing thing) they have commented positively. I think the A's show dedication and committment to a job well done that would carry over into your career.

    I'll put it like this............Just b/c you know how to do something well at the hospital are you going to slack off there too? Don't be a "slcaker", we have far too many of those as it is in the nursing profession. Hope this doesn't come across as b*****, it's not intended to be that at all. Guess it's just the mommy in me!!
    With all the interviews I've had, they've never asked me what my gpa was. My gpa is not on my resume. I have a lot of work experience and other experiences, (such as Who's who, SNA delegate, Class facilitator, many volunteer hours...) I don't think it's necessary. Now, I do agree, no one should ever slack just to make it easier. Learn as much as you can!
  6. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    My employers checked my grades. They had my permission to. I guess it all varies with what and where you're applying to as to whether they check grades or not.

    I (most of all) wanted to learn the material. I got good grades because i personally wanted to, but i also have plans to eventually get my masters, and knew that would be a factor in acceptance.
  7. by   Maggie in NC
    C=RN

    I'm a single mom. I have a 4.0 but if I slip, I don't care. It's hard to manage a 14 year old and all my nursing instructors! Sometimes I just have to tell them-easy on the test material, I've had enough psy clinical at home! LOL
  8. by   francine79
    I think grades are a reflection of how hard you are willing to try to succeed. I just recently was offered a few positions and I feel that my grades definitely played a role in getting these offers. I put on my resume any honors I received (dean's list, president's list, scholarships, etc.) and the unit directors that interviewed me were very impressed with my academic success. Getting through nursing school is hard work. Being able to maintain good grades show that you are serious about becoming a nurse and are willing to put forth tremendous effort to reach that goal. Although grades aren't everything, they certainly help when it comes to getting a job.
  9. by   Sirius Black
    I've heard a 'saying' around uni "p's get degrees". Although it's true, after graduating and going for job ask yourself this ... who would be more likely to get the job - the graduate with a Pass/credit average or the one with a distinction + average??
    For this reason, I intend on working my butt off studying for the next 3 years, not only in prac/skill areas (S/N only) but also theory component too - hopefully the hard work will help maintain at least a mid-distinction average or higher (75% +) - credit average, I believe is most common.

    Nb: P = 50-59%, C = 60-69% D = 70-79% and HD= 80%+
  10. by   grinnurse
    Quote from JENRN2BMICHIGAN
    With all the interviews I've had, they've never asked me what my gpa was. My gpa is not on my resume. I have a lot of work experience and other experiences, (such as Who's who, SNA delegate, Class facilitator, many volunteer hours...) I don't think it's necessary. Now, I do agree, no one should ever slack just to make it easier. Learn as much as you can!
    I have had to submit transcript 2x for job interviews. Could it be different areas that we live in? The bigger hospitals in the area in which I live always ask for a transcript b/c you've got 47 applicants for 5 jobs so I think they are looking for the "cream of the crop". To me that would be the ones that don't slack but give it everything they've got!! They also ask for at least 2 letters of reference. Who is going to get the good letter would you think? The slacker or the A student? I agree with the other poster, you want to know as much as you can so you can treat your patient.
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from grinnurse
    They also ask for at least 2 letters of reference. Who is going to get the good letter would you think? The slacker or the A student?
    That's another good point. The hospital I want to work for not only requests transcripts but, they also ask for two letters of reference from instructors. I doubt I could get those letters if my grades weren't good.

    Obviously, you can still get a job if you go the C=RN route. But you may not always get the job you want. The hospital I want to work for is flooded with applications because they're the best place to work in the area. So, perhaps that's why they're more picky.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 9, '05
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I think that was why my employer looked at my grades. Supossedly there were over 30 applications for two jobs.
  13. by   lisamc1RN
    I think it's important to do the absolute best job that we can do, whether it's in nursing school or on the job. I don't want to be a slacker nurse so I'm not going to be a slacker nursing student. It is one thing for me to study hard, do the best I can do and get a C. It's another entirely for me to learn the absolute minimum I need to in order to pass. We have people's lives in our hands. If we can learn more, then we should.
  14. by   Tweety
    Why do you even ask? Because you know you're not going to be a slacker in school and you're going to get that 4.0. No need to justify it or defend it.

    Just ribbing you for fun. LOL

    I've only had two employers and neither of them looked at my grades. But it was on resume that I graduated with honors.

    I agree with Lisa, just always strive to do the best that you can. For you, I know it's going to be all A's. So enjoy those A's and be proud, whether in ten years it matters, doesn't matter, just keep on keeping on.
    Last edit by Tweety on Apr 9, '05

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