Repeat Education?!

  1. Hey everyone!

    I went to nursing school and graduated Dec 2013. I was 19 years old, didn't take the program very seriously, didn't have responsibilities and I definitely wasn't anticipating the nclex being so difficult. While it's not an excuse, it's the truth. I crammed for my exams and barely studied, somehow I managed to pass all of my classes, proctors, and exit exam.... don't ask how because I'm really not sure. I graduated and started doing the virtual ATI program that my school offered, took be about a month but I received my green light to sit for my boards. The night before my exam, my old program director called me and told me I would not pass, that I needed extra time but of course I did not listen.... I failed with 76 questions.

    After I failed, I was devastated. I began studying so hard that I was eating, sleeping and living nclex. I retested May 2014 and failed again with 265 questions. They say that is the closest you can get to actually passing. I was "at the level of passing" on absolutely everything, but because I wasn't "above the level" I was failed. To say I was devastated was an understatement.... I gave up.

    I tested again without studying at all (like not even opening a book) in Nov 2014 and failed with 186 questions. In Florida, If you fail 3 consecutive times you have to take a remedial course... so I did. From Feb 2015-April 2015 I spent my life studying for this exam, I just had to pass.... well, May 2015 I failed again with 265 questions. That was the last time I opened a book, tested, etc. I think about it every single day.

    Fast forward to now, I am married (over a year), and I have a beautiful 7 month old baby girl.... I need this more than ever. I have responsibilities now, a family who needs me and I will be damned if I do not become an RN one way or another... so here is what I'm thinking. And yes, I may just be crazy!!

    I believe eve I am wasting money by constantly paying for an exam that I am obviously not passing for whatever reason, and the remediation course didn't help me pass either. I'm tired of wasting my time, my families time and money on this. I want to go back to school. I want to start over from the beginning and take this program seriously since I did not before. I was 19 then... I'm 25 now. Am I insane? Florida does not require you to ever go back to school, I can test until I'm blue in the face.. my old school will not accept me back because legally I cannot pass courses and get a degree and then retake them.... but I have been told by other schools that I could start as a new student as long as the board approved. Or maybe I go down the LPN route, get my license and then do a bridge program to become an RN... idk, all I know is I want this.

    I cant find any information for anyone that has ever been in my situation before. Has ANYONE ever successfully passed nursing school and returned for a second time? Is this something the FL BON will allow me to peruse? Sorry for the long inquiry.... any adviceor information will be appreciated!
  2. Visit nursingstudent_12kp profile page

    About nursingstudent_12kp, ASN

    Joined: Feb '12; Posts: 41; Likes: 9

    20 Comments

  3. by   CharleeFoxtrot
    Quote from nursingstudent_12kp
    I believe eve I am wasting money by constantly paying for an exam that I am obviously not passing for whatever reason, and the remediation course didn't help me pass either. I'm tired of wasting my time, my families time and money on this.
    I am saying this with the best of intentions, so please take it in the spirit to which it was intended. Being a nurse is not only about passing the NCLEX, it is about learning how to take care of human beings at their most vulnerable. You are studying very hard, and not grasping the lessons enough to pass the NCLEX multiple times. The test exists for a reason. Perhaps you should go meet with a school counselor and think about another career choice, rather than pursing what ultimately seems to be a bad fit for you. Best of luck to you whatever you decide.
    Last edit by CharleeFoxtrot on May 2 : Reason: finish one last thought
  4. by   nursingstudent_12kp
    Did you not read my post? I only studied hard 2 out of the 4 times I tested. The first time I barely did ati and was even called from my director and told. Not to test, and the 3rd time I never opened a book. Instead of telling me to switch careers, why didn't you just keep scrolling. My confidence and motivation could of gone without that.
  5. by   hherrn
    Well, that's the problem with asking a bunch of strangers a question. You get answers. Some you will like, some you won't.
    You have to admit, "Did you not read my post? I only studied hard 2 out of the 4 times I tested." does not inspire confidence.

    OTOH- when I went to school, there was definitely a higher failure rate amongst younger people with fewer commitments despite the extra time they could have chosen to commit to their education, and I was impressed by the working, often single, moms who passed.

    At this point, you would like to go back to school for something. Why not choose nursing school?
  6. by   Crush
    Quote from CharleeFoxtrot
    I am saying this with the best of intentions, so please take it in the spirit to which it was intended. Being a nurse is not only about passing the NCLEX, it is about learning how to take care of human beings at their most vulnerable. You are studying very hard, and not grasping the lessons enough to pass the NCLEX multiple times. The test exists for a reason. Perhaps you should go meet with a school counselor and think about another career choice, rather than pursing what ultimately seems to be a bad fit for you. Best of luck to you whatever you decide.
    Quote from nursingstudent_12kp
    Did you not read my post? I only studied hard 2 out of the 4 times I tested. The first time I barely did ati and was even called from my director and told. Not to test, and the 3rd time I never opened a book. Instead of telling me to switch careers, why didn't you just keep scrolling. My confidence and motivation could of gone without that.

    They are providing some constructive, well-intended food for thought. Being a nurse is not just book knowledge, it is how you will apply it safely and with critical thinking. I am not sure what kind of advice to offer except that when you read different perspectives, please take the time to understand why it was given and the intent behind it. I wish you well whatever choices you make.
  7. by   elkpark
    From reading your initial post, it sounds like a large part of the problem is that you didn't master the material in nursing school the first time around. Do you have the option in FL of sitting the NCLEX-PN, and then possible do an LPN-to-RN bridge program, as someone else suggested? That would at least get you started, and would be less schooling than completing an entire second RN program.

    I know you say you really want this, but how motivated are you, really, if, as you say, you barely studied for the exam two of the four times you've taken it and were advised by your program director that you weren't ready to test?? Magical thinking ("This time I'll pass, even though I'm not prepared") isn't going to get you v. far. Lots of people want to become RNs, but it takes quite a bit more than simply wanting it.

    Best wishes.
  8. by   nursingstudent_12kp
    That's what I'm saying... I'd like to go back to nursing school but not sure if it's an option. And I know I may not like some of the answers but telling someone to switch careers isn't a place for anyone to say. Like I said, I'm in a much better place now and believe I would do better. It's not as if I've tried my best and just can't make it.
  9. by   nursingstudent_12kp
    This was 4 years ago when this happened. I haven't touched a book or studied since 2015.... so it's been 2 1/2 years since I've "barely studied" for my exams. I was immature without any responsibilities. It's different now.
  10. by   Pixie.RN
    OP, do you have test anxiety or any similar issues that need addressing?

    I would suggest seeing if you have the option of taking the NCLEX-PN. Now I wasn't an LPN before I was an RN, but I have had LPNs tell me that they thought the NCLEX-PN was just about as difficult as the RN version. But I think an LPN-RN bridge would suit you well. Best of luck.
  11. by   nursingstudent_12kp
    Thank you! I have really bad test anxiety actually so I think it was a mixture of not being prepared and being in my head about it.
  12. by   ProperlySeasoned
    I like the idea of repeating school for several reasons. You will get a chance to truely learn the material, and past the boards. More importantly, you will solve the five year gap between graduation and licensure. In a competative market, this gap will be a deteriment to hiring. One suggestion - based on the age you graduated, it sounds like you went to an ADN program. Why not go for a BSN? This will give you a more marketable degree, you will learn something new, and it will feel less like "repeating" and more like "enhancing."
  13. by   nursingstudent_12kp
    Thank you! The reason I have chosen another ADN program is because it is faster and I can begin working sooner... 1 1/2- 2 years Max. Instead of 4... another is because I have my bachelors in something else already and will be using that as an MSN requirement in a RN-MSN bridge program once I'm finally licensed lol I'm essentially skipping the BSN.
  14. by   nursingstudent_12kp
    Thank you so much!

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