Reading alot of posts discussing "A" nursing students vs "C" nursing students - page 7

I still want to voice my opinion. Lately, I've been reading alot of post discussing "A" nursing students verses "C" nursing students. It breaks my heart that there are students that are so hung up on... Read More

  1. by   Multicollinearity
    I think other students' grades are kind of like credit reports and bank accounts. Highly important data that's not other students' business!

    It seems there are more important things to focus on than classmates' grades. "C" students will have to live with the grades on their transcripts for the rest of their lives. Such grades may initially affect their employment opportunities and even decades later - chances to further their education. So I certainly have no need to argue over their grades.
  2. by   2BSure
    Competition, in and of itself, is not a bad thing. It leads to excellence in many fields. It seems that the deal is about attitude. High grades can be an indicator of smarts but they can also be an indicator of effort, or both. Poorer grades are not necessarily an indicator of lack of smarts -- but they can be. Neither are poorer grades necessarily an indicator of a crappy attitude of doing the minimum possible to get by -- but they can be. Poorer grades can also be an indicator of a highly leveraged personal life such as children, aging/sick parents, needing to work while at school, bereavement during a semester etc.

    It is entirely possible a 4.0 GPA nurse may suck in some ways that are not academic. But he/she, in order to pass clinical should have been graded on all aspects of care (including the "soft" skills). It is entirely possible that a C average student (let's say C average is a pass at your NS) can be an awesome frigging nurse - no doubt.

    Frankly, anyone can be a crappy nurse. Even people that start off with great attitudes and a desire to be a great nurse can become someone to whom you wouldn't give the wind of your fart. Nor would you let them work on your family.

    I think what I read in these discussions, ad nauseam, is those with straight A's are proud of the fact, as they should be. Those with lesser grades can be a wee bit defensive and then the others get defensive and it all gets bloody ridiculous.

    What I will say is that it is not rocket science to get a clue about someone's smarts and attitude, and combination thereof, during an interview or even from their application. I can sit in front of someone who did not do as well academically and get whether they will go the extra mile to ensure they know what they are doing. Equally, I can sit in front of an academic rock star and get that they are utterly unteachable and lacking humility of any kind. Also, I have seen the reverse of both.

    We could debate this forever. No one is going to "win". I confess I am a little self-satisfied about my academic achievements. So shoot me.

    If you have the capacity to be honest with yourself, you will know the truth about your academic performance and no one else. I have officially decided that unless you are asking me for a job or looking after my family it is NONE of my business how smart you are (note I did not say what grades you had).

    I say this because I now see the back biting on this thread as one of the symptoms that plagues the nursing profession -- it is what I call the rush to judge. At best it is followed by the roll of the eyes and the deep sigh when someone speaks or arrives for a shift. At worst it is the ********, gossiping and overt aggression that I see all of the time. Given that we are professionals it is quite horrifying how we behave. Yet, we want the public at large, physicians, pharmacists etc. to have a high opinion of us and our profession. Well it is not going to happen until our collective house is in order.
  3. by   busby's mom
    For you nursing student 19! I thought what you had to say was very well-written and necessary. Grades don't measure the type of nurse you will be, it simply shows that you have excellent test-taking skills. I used to work in the legal field and am now changing careers and begin my first year of nursing this fall. Anyway, I knew an attorney who had excellent grades, but wasn't able to apply that knowledge and everyone talked about it. Being book smart is one thing, applying it is the important part. I have a 4.0 gpa going into the nursing program, but I have talked to friends who study their butts off and sometimes gets A's and other times not. I am fully aware that the tests are completely different than just regurgitating facts so I'm just hoping to do well. My focus is understanding the material and being able to apply it whether I get straight A's or not. I think it's mean to put others down if they don't get straight A's. the program is stressful enough and to add the pressure of perfection is an unfair and unreasonable label. So to everyone out there in the program kudos to you for working so hard and doing your best. Don't let anyone make you feel like you're less of a nurse just b/c you don't have all A's. I'm striving to do MY best and if that means graduating with a C well, so be it. I will know in my heart that I did my best and no one can take that away from you. Good luck to everyone!
  4. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Quote from HeartsOpenWide
    I have never heard a school where a 2.67 us not a B-....the way most nursing schools do things is that a B might be a 90% instead of an 85% which the rest of the college is graded on...nursing programs do not make their own GPA....but if they are doing things like 90% for a B it is going to affect your GPA more than it would other students in different programs of study that used the basic grading scale.

    Another posted stated that in her program you have to maintain a 2.67 which is a B- that isn't the case at my school. A 2.67 at my school would be a very low C. Ours grading system does change for the nursing program (it gets stricter) but even in the non nursing courses anything below a 3.0 is a C

    Looking at a few of the grading systems that people have talked about in here (ironically those that are saying A's are the good nurses and C's aren't) with the grading system their school has, it seems like it should be easy to make A's and B's. Our grade system is a lot stricter.
  5. by   fiveofpeep
    it annoys me that people decide so frequently that if you have A's you must only be book smart. I think that is malicious to say. I have a 4.00 and I am successful in clinicals. I know people who are just getting by scholastically who are very successful in clinicals...and those who arent. It goes both ways. I just dont get why people feel the need to be so hostile to people who do well in lecture.

    It's like the thought process is "if they're so darn good at lecture, they must be dumb as rocks with common sense. I'll say anything to make myself feel better"

    And it also annoys me when people say "well you must not have anything going on in your life then..."
    I know people who have kids who thrive and those who dont.

    I think when it all comes down to it, its about the effort you put in and your own personal drive and no one of us nursing students has any right at all to determine who is "book smart" and who is "street smart." Its all so silly.

    I agree with what someone else said, "Its no one's business"

    And I also agree with the emphasis on teamwork. My program started out super competetive and now we are all so helpful to eachother and its great. We are all in this together.
  6. by   byrd262
    Isn't it funny that we put so much into Clinicals, but they are PASS/FAIL.

    --My neutral 2 cents
  7. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from byrd262
    Isn't it funny that we put so much into Clinicals, but they are PASS/FAIL.

    --My neutral 2 cents

    Mine aren't. They count for half my grade, so I'm in Acute Care II and it's 6 credits. 50% of my grade is from my theory class and 50% of my grade is from clinicals & lab...mostly clinicals. All my nursing classes are like that....each term our clincals are built into one of the classes.

    So, our grades really do account for both academic and practical skill....if you're great in one area and not in the other...you won't have stellar grades.

    Peace,
    CuriousMe
  8. by   byrd262
    Quote from CuriousMe
    Mine aren't. They count for half my grade, so I'm in Acute Care II and it's 6 credits. 50% of my grade is from my theory class and 50% of my grade is from clinicals & lab...mostly clinicals. All my nursing classes are like that....each term our clincals are built into one of the classes.

    So, our grades really do account for both academic and practical skill....if you're great in one area and not in the other...you won't have stellar grades.

    Peace,
    CuriousMe

    Really??? Wow. I shouldn't have assumed that. I thought it was universal. You are really lucky then. I hate that I put so much into clinical and have nothing to show for it in--terms of grades. I will say though that our care plans and some of the other activites like running group in psych count for our lecture grade but...we have to achieve a C- or higher on the cumulative exams and quizzes FIRST. The rest of your work like your care plans and papers aren't calculated until you have a 70 in the theory.

    For example, if I have a 65 average on the exams/quizzes, I fail even if my care plans and paper(s) would boost my grade to a 75 for instance.
  9. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from byrd262
    Really??? Wow. I shouldn't have assumed that. I thought it was universal. You are really lucky then. I hate that I put so much into clinical and have nothing to show for it in--terms of grades. I will say though that our care plans and some of the other activites like running group in psych count for our lecture grade but...we have to achieve a C- or higher on the cumulative exams and quizzes FIRST. The rest of your work like your care plans and papers aren't calculated until you have a 70 in the theory.

    For example, if I have a 65 average on the exams/quizzes, I fail even if my care plans and paper(s) would boost my grade to a 75 for instance.
    I should mention as well that we need to pass both clinical and theory to pass the class...you can't use a good grade in one, to pass in the other.....so that's similar to what you're talking about.

    And yes I do like that my grade comes from both....cause, nursing really requires mastery of both areas.

    Peace,
    CuriousMe
  10. by   NurseLoveJoy88
    I did not start this thread to make excuses for "c" students or to say "A" students are only book smart. I started this thread with the intentions that individuals could share their experiences and hopefully by doing this there will be at least one student here who will open his or her mind and come to the conclusion that A or C students can still have the potential to be good, competent, and caring nurses. I've scored grades from A's-C's in nursing school. Actually I just finished Med surg 2 and my final grade was a 79.7 ( talk about close). This is the first nursing course that I've got a C average in. While I'm proud of myself for passing, I couldn't help but think about some of the threads discussing A students to C students. For once I was that "C" student. I make no excuses for my grades... none. Even after the exam I came to allnurses to figure out why I got some of my test questions wrong because I was concerned about the information I was tested on and got wrong on the exam. C ALWAYS = RN, however RN does not always = caring and competent nurses, if that was the case there wouldn't be so many RN's on trial and sued... just ask the BON. I wish we could get out of the c=RN because it takes more then grades to become a great nurse.
    Some of these posts were encouraging and uplifting and some were not. I don't want anyone to feel upset or hurt by anothers words and as I can see its already starting to happen. I guess the mods will decide when or if to close this thread but if others are getting angry or upset over some of the posts its best to close it now and end this thread on a good note.
    I want to thank everyone for their posts and hopefully there was one student that opened their minds and changed their negative view of A students or C students.
    I want to wish everyone luck in their studying as well. Hang in there guys !
  11. by   fiveofpeep
    not angry. just annoyed

    I digg your idea for discussion because it does seem a controversial one.
  12. by   melmarie23
    Quote from CuriousMe
    Mine aren't. They count for half my grade, so I'm in Acute Care II and it's 6 credits. 50% of my grade is from my theory class and 50% of my grade is from clinicals & lab...mostly clinicals. All my nursing classes are like that....each term our clincals are built into one of the classes.

    So, our grades really do account for both academic and practical skill....if you're great in one area and not in the other...you won't have stellar grades.
    Same here. This is exactly how our clinicals works. Its half our grade for its respective class.
  13. by   polka-dot
    Quote from maggiofliore
    it annoys me that people decide so frequently that if you have A's you must only be book smart. I think that is malicious to say. I have a 4.00 and I am successful in clinicals. I know people who are just getting by scholastically who are very successful in clinicals...and those who arent. It goes both ways. I just dont get why people feel the need to be so hostile to people who do well in lecture.

    It's like the thought process is "if they're so darn good at lecture, they must be dumb as rocks with common sense. I'll say anything to make myself feel better"
    I agree...this is a ridiculous argument, as though there are only two options (good at lecture and horrible at clinical, or vice versa). I got a 4.0 this semester (and my school gives A-, so an A is anything above 93 or 94...don't really know as I wouldn't let myself get that close to the edge), and my clinical instructor gave me glowing reviews, as did the nurses I worked with on the floor and even one of my patients who insited on writing my CI a note.

    I agree that as long as you are trying your best then you will succeed, be it as an A student or a B or C student. But doing the bare minimum when lives are at stake is absolutely shameful, in my opinion.

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