Reading alot of posts discussing "A" nursing students vs "C" nursing students - page 5

I still want to voice my opinion. Lately, I've been reading alot of post discussing "A" nursing students verses "C" nursing students. It breaks my heart that there are students that are so hung up on... Read More

  1. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Quote from BeeNursey10
    C- students are more likely to struggle through and fail out of nursing school.
    C-students are more likely to be those last minute studyers and poor test takers.
    C-students are more likely to cram for exams.
    C-students are more likely to have excuses for why they don't get higher grades.
    C-students are less likely to retain information into their long term memory.
    C-students are less likely to be able to connect the dots of how one thing in the body can influence another.
    C-students are more likely to argue with the instructor over test questions.
    C-students are less likely to want to understand the rationale behind the right answer on exams. hey, as long as you passed it right?
    C-students are more likely to rely on other nurses knowledge and not know what to do if an emergency arises with their patients. response time to the patients needs will be delayed.
    C-students don't have good critical thinking skills which is why they got c's in the first place.
    C-students are more likely to repeat NCLEX. they will have doubts, doubts, and more doubts about their chances of passing the NCLEX exam.
    Is this supposed to be factual information or merely your opinion? If this is supposed to be factual information I would like to see the research and studies done to prove this from reputable sources.

    Some of the people in this thread have said that it is OK to be a C Student if that is your best and you tried and that doesn't make you a bad nurse, but than say, if you are a C student because you are just a slacker than that makes you a bad nurse. (I paraphrased of course) so how do you know which C student is the good one or bad one.


    It also seems the assumptions keep being made about the "C" students, (I put in quotes since some schools the normal B really Equals a C in the nursing program) but "A" students are so quick to get offended when assumptions are made on them.

    It doesn't take being an A student or B student to see Hypocrisy at it's finest. LOL That there is good old common sense that people either have or they don't.
  2. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Quote from awhitt001
    At my school, the lowest grade that you can have in pre-reqs, as well as ALL nursing classes and clinicals is a B- (2.7 -- the bar is set high here). If you need to take a pre-req over, you can only do so once. Each class you take over causes you to loose points on your application. Once you get in to the nursing program, anything under a B- and you are dropped from the program and there is no garauntee that you will be permitted to return.

    That may sound a bit harsh, but to be honest, the competition is tight to even get in. This is a limited enrollment program with no "wait listing". There are so many "good students" applying for the program, that during the last round of admissions (twice a year at my school), the lowest GPA that made it in was a 3.6 and that person got over 80 on the NET test. Anyone that thinks they can get into the program with even a B average here is severly mistaken. The same can pretty much be said for anyone that needs to take a class over because of the lost application points.

    While I will agree, that not everyone is a good test taker, or a good care giver, or a good critical thinker, the reality is that if you aren't all three, then you need to be in a different line of work. When I or any of my family are in need of medical care, I expect that they are all of the above -- no if's, and's or but's about it. I expect that if a crisis arrives, my caregivers and medical professionals will react to the situation in a calm and determined manner, that the correct procedures will be followed, that the correct medication and dosage will be given and that it will be done in a manner that is caring. I can't imagine that anyone would want less from thier medical team.

    As some of the people that are in positions to hire or manage nurses have already said, grades do say something about your abilities. That is why they use them in thier hiring practices. The fact is that if you know the material, you should have no problems with taking tests or performing well under the "watchful eye of the instructor". If you are the type that "knows the info" but "just don't do well on tests", or you "get nervous when the instructor puts you on the line", then I don't want you as my nurse. You think that tests are hard?!? What do you think that the real thing is going to be?... easier?!?

    I really am not trying to be mean or offensive, and I am certainly not making a judgement of anyone as a person. The reality is that you don't always get to do what you want in life and IMHO, this is one of those professions where "average" just isn't good enough.

    If you are a "C" student, and you have your heart set on being a nurse, the question I'd have to ask is... why? If it's the money, why not tryout computers, or marketing. Do you just love taking care of people? What about going into hospitality or event planning? Is it being in medicine that appeals to you? How about going into billing or coding?

    As aways, I wish the very best to all of us
    Guess that shows how different the grading systems are different places. A B at my school is a 3.0 there is no B- or B+ it's an 84 or 85% equals a B, Below that is a C. I can't remember off the top of my head I think it's 84
  3. by   awhitt001
    Quote from ~Mi Vida Loca~
    Guess that shows how different the grading systems are different places. A B at my school is a 3.0 there is no B- or B+ it's an 84 or 85% equals a B, Below that is a C. I can't remember off the top of my head I think it's 84

    Yep, sounds like yours is the same as mine. A "B" is a 3.0 here too.
  4. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from tbell2
    Ug. I didn't want to get involved. I guess I dont' have to, but I have a question.

    Those who have said they consider a C failing: Can I assume then, if you were to get a C you would withdraw yourself of your own volition and re-enter to strive for what you would consider a passing grade?
    I would not let it come to that point, where I actually would have to accept a C as a final grade. I monitor and keep track of my progress very closely as I go along in a typical class. For example, in my A&P II class a couple of semesters ago, in my first exam, I only got an 84. A solid "B", and yes, I suppose many people would be satisfied and happy with that, but I wasn't. In fact I was pretty upset and disappointed with myself. It was sort of a "wake up call" for me that hey I'd better get my butt in gear and study more and harder. I actually tried to analyze how and why I'd only gotten an 84 even though I considered that I'd studied sufficiently for it. I concluded that I had probably let my guard down somewhat and maybe had become a wee bit complacent, since the semester before, with the same professor, I missed getting an A in A&P I by less than one percentage point and ended up with a final grade of 89% - a high B but not quite good enough for an A. For me, a score of 84 on anything is just a bit too close to "C country" for comfort. And lets face it, if you end up sliding by with only a C-, that means you are only mastering 70% of the material covered. I try to push myself to do better than that.

    To directly answer your question, no I would not entirely withdraw from school (if that's what you're meaning), I'm not the "quitter" type, but if it were allowed, I would probably voluntarily try to take the class over again to get a grade better than a C just to prove to myself and to the rest of the world that I had properly mastered at least 80% of the course material. I guess I've never thought much about "what would I do if I actually got a C?" because if you start thinking a lot in that manner, it can end up being a self-fulfilling prophecy - you're unknowingly lowering your own personal standards (and confidence in yourself) by accepting in advance that you might fail - sort of defeatist thinking in my book. It's best not to think of it as acceptable or an option in the first place, and be honestly tough and hard on yourself enough to ensure that it doesn't actually happen.
  5. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Quote from awhitt001

    If you are a "C" student, and you have your heart set on being a nurse, the question I'd have to ask is... why? If it's the money, why not tryout computers, or marketing. Do you just love taking care of people? What about going into hospitality or event planning? Is it being in medicine that appeals to you? How about going into billing or coding?

    As aways, I wish the very best to all of us

    I am not in nursing school until August, so I don't know what grade student I am yet, but I have to wonder, why does it matter WHY a C nurse wants to be a nurse as opposed to a A nurse or B nurse ???? That doesn't make any sense to me.

    Getting a B at your school would be getting a C at mine. I think we have established that SOME employers look at transcripts and SOME don't. It has no bearing as to the type of hospital it is. None of the Pt. are going to have any idea what grades their nurse got so it seems a moot point to me to say "I want the A nurse".

    A lot of Nursing Schools require 100% pass on the Dosage and Calculations tests for obvious reasons, even if they require a C to pass the other course, you can have straight A's but if you don't pass the Dosage tests you fail the whole program. At my school you get 3 tries to pass the text, if you don't and you miss one you are dismissed from the program.

    Last but not least, being an A student does NOT make you immune from Medical Errors, or mistakes when you are a nurse. We are all humans (hopefully) and no one is perfect.
  6. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Oh and to be honest, I don't understand why threads like these or other threads get closed. If people are flaming, remove those posters, if people don't want to read it, don't read it. But I don't see anything wrong with a good debate even if it is 30 pages long.

    I have seen many threads closed and I sit there and think WHY??? Just let the people debate as long as no one is flaming anyone else.

    JMO
  7. by   dblpn
    Quote from ~Mi Vida Loca~
    You mean you don't know for sure???
    that's right i don't know for sure if the teacher said d5 or d50. and if you're thinking that i should know which one would bring up a blood sugar, i don't. well, i'm a new nursing student and we havent got to that part of med surg yet.
  8. by   msdeannah
    [quote=BeeNursey10;3642292]C- students are more likely to struggle through and fail out of nursing school.
    C-students are more likely to be those last minute studyers and poor test takers.
    C-students are more likely to cram for exams.
    C-students are more likely to have excuses for why they don't get higher grades.
    C-students are less likely to retain information into their long term memory.
    C-students are less likely to be able to connect the dots of how one thing in the body can influence another.
    C-students are more likely to argue with the instructor over test questions.
    C-students are less likely to want to understand the rationale behind the right answer on exams. hey, as long as you passed it right?
    C-students are more likely to rely on other nurses knowledge and not know what to do if an emergency arises with their patients. response time to the patients needs will be delayed.
    C-students don't have good critical thinking skills which is why they got c's in the first place.
    C-students are more likely to repeat NCLEX. they will have doubts, doubts, and more doubts about their chances of passing the NCLEX exam.

    I don't start nursing school until the fall so I have yet to be placed in a box. My question is even if this is factual information... Why on earth would you post this. To a C student this must be the most hurtful thing to see. I mean seriously... I have seen stuff in this thread that C students should consider a different occupation, and the this list of sterotypes. Isn't this supposed to be a place to come for support. I hope if I have a hard time in school, that there are supportive people I can turn to.
  9. by   truern
    Quote from BeeNursey10
    that's right i don't know for sure if the teacher said d5 or d50. and if you're thinking that i should know which one would bring up a blood sugar, i don't. well, i'm a new nursing student and we havent got to that part of med surg yet.
    In her defense (which she probably doesn't need) your profile states you have "20 years of experience in LTC, MED-SURG,ER,ICU" which is misleading. Anybody with 20 years of experience would know it was D50...heck, anybody far enough in nursing school would know. Just a thought
  10. by   tbell2
    Quote from PCstudent2009
    I would not let it come to that point, where I actually would have to accept a C as a final grade. I monitor and keep track of my progress very closely as I go along in a typical class. For example, in my A&P II class a couple of semesters ago, in my first exam, I only got an 84. A solid "B", and yes, I suppose many people would be satisfied and happy with that, but I wasn't. In fact I was pretty upset and disappointed with myself. It was sort of a "wake up call" for me that hey I'd better get my butt in gear and study more and harder. I actually tried to analyze how and why I'd only gotten an 84 even though I considered that I'd studied sufficiently for it. I concluded that I had probably let my guard down somewhat and maybe had become a wee bit complacent, since the semester before, with the same professor, I missed getting an A in A&P I by less than one percentage point and ended up with a final grade of 89% - a high B but not quite good enough for an A. For me, a score of 84 on anything is just a bit too close to "C country" for comfort. And lets face it, if you end up sliding by with only a C-, that means you are only mastering 70% of the material covered. I try to push myself to do better than that.

    To directly answer your question, no I would not entirely withdraw from school (if that's what you're meaning), I'm not the "quitter" type, but if it were allowed, I would probably voluntarily try to take the class over again to get a grade better than a C just to prove to myself and to the rest of the world that I had properly mastered at least 80% of the course material. I guess I've never thought much about "what would I do if I actually got a C?" because if you start thinking a lot in that manner, it can end up being a self-fulfilling prophecy - you're unknowingly lowering your own personal standards (and confidence in yourself) by accepting in advance that you might fail - sort of defeatist thinking in my book. It's best not to think of it as acceptable or an option in the first place, and be honestly tough and hard on yourself enough to ensure that it doesn't actually happen.
    This is exactly what I was asking! So if you got a C on any exam you would withdraw from the class that day and re-enter that class at the next possible opening. I don't know how things work at your school, but at mine, I have heard it can take up to 2 full semesters to re-enter any class. Personally, I would prefer to accept the passing grade, find out which areas on the test I did poorly on, and study up on those so I don't kill anyone. I wouldn't want to set myself back a year.

    Also, which school are you at where 80% is a B and 70% is not failing?!?!?!
  11. by   2BSure
    Quote from Meriwhen

    On a semi-related note, I would be estatic if Allnurses could create a section for the topics that have been beaten into the ground, and all of these "A vs. C Students" threads would go into it. Along with "ADN vs. BSN", "Foreign-born vs. US nurses" and "Entering nursing as a divine calling vs entering nursing for a job/money" just to name a few, since it's the same arguments over and over and over and over in them. Maybe have a spot to give them a little break from posts since there's a new one every two weeks (if not more often). I know, my posting in them doesn't help control them any

    But that's my opinion, so I'll get on the flame-retardant vest now.
    They are only eaten to death if you have been posting here for a while. Just ignore us and let us get on with our babbling Maybe I will get over these things after another couple of weeks --but maybe it will continue to be like watching a train wreck...one just can't look away.

    Could you imagine having these discussions face to face? I am sure their would be fur flying!
  12. by   kjwarren
    What bothers me is that a "C" used to mean average, not "bottom of the barrel." I don't imagine school work has gotten any easier, so why should I "C" now look like a "D" or an "F"?

    Personally, I am never happy with a "C" though I have had my share of them. I have really bad anxiety though and tests often don't go as planned because I get too stressed out. Also, I had plenty of classes when I went to school for my first degree where the teachers barely did their jobs. Either there was favoritism (ie: no matter how hard I worked I knew I was going to get a "B" because I wasn't one of the chosen ones) or the teachers didn't feel like bothering with proper grading procedures. I took one class where we had to do project with the program Access (database program in Microsoft Office) and for one of the assignments I only did half of it (I didn't understand it and no one would help me, and I had a 100% in the class so I didn't care) and the other I didn't do any of it. The first project (half-done one) I got a 0%... fine with me, I did part of it, but it wasn't done, so whatever. The second one I got 100%. I didn't even do the second one! Does that make sense? No! I still finished the class with more than 100% (extra credit is my friend) so it all turned out ok, but it really showed me that grades are NOT always important.

    What's important to me is that I come out of it learning something. Because honestly, I got A's in a lot of classes that I remember nothing from. I would hope this kind of thing wouldn't happen in NS, but I'm not there yet so I can't say.

    In my experience, education in the United States focuses on passing the tests, not on learning. Think about it, if you had REALLY learned the information, would you need to cram for 6 hours before a test (and I know a lot of you didn't, and bravo to you!) but for a lot of people that is not the case. We are taught in a way that makes us learn something really well for about a week, and then it's gone. But who cares? We got A's, right? As long as we can flash that letter around it's all good.

    While I agree that a nurse with all A's looks better than a nurse with C's, don't assume that the nurse with all A's necessarily worked any harder or is any smarter than the one with C's. It's just not always true. I got an A+ in my Introduction to Psychology class but I couldn't tell you a darn thing about it. I'm going to have to really cram when it comes time for placement testing.
  13. by   dblpn
    Quote from truern
    In her defense (which she probably doesn't need) your profile states you have "20 years of experience in LTC, MED-SURG,ER,ICU" which is misleading. Anybody with 20 years of experience would know it was D50...heck, anybody far enough in nursing school would know. Just a thought
    my profile is not misleading maybe you should go back and reread it. i've been and still is a CNA,CMT,PCT and now a new nursing student! i've been in the field for about 20yrs. so no misleading there. as i've stated in a previous post that we havent gotten that deep into med surg yet. it's going by fast so we're getting there.

    Good nite.

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