Pharm self-study plan?

  1. Does anyone have a self-study plan they've done for pharmacology? We have an integrated curriculum at my CC and so there is no formal pharm course. I would like to do some self-study over the summer. I finally feel like I'm slowly starting to get somewhere, but would love to gain a better perspective. I have the Adams pharm book and the Saunders NCLEX (I was thinking the pharm chapters there would be good to quiz myself as I haven't even looked at those). Does anyone have any ideas? I've thought about taking a course somewhere, but I don't really have the money and I won't need an official course for the MSN program I'm (hopefully) going to eventually.
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    About ladybugsea

    Joined: Oct '05; Posts: 217; Likes: 23

    31 Comments

  3. by   Scrubz
    I've wanted to do this too because I'm kind of in the same boat. If I ever go back for my BSN I'll get to take a pharm class, but not in my ADN program. We have to take more important classes, like microbiology .

    So if anyone knows of a good book..
  4. by   Msnurselaura
    I just got into the program and start in Aug. Im finishing up Pharm and Barely passing. And of course the final in accumlative. yuk! And suggestions to learn all this info without killing myself?

    Thanks
  5. by   Thedreamer
    well is it just the math or drugs or both? We do both over 2 terms. I am in my 2nd term with pharm. I can help with suggestions or what not ^^

    If its just prep you want, I can email you a list of the drugs most commonly used in the hospital per system. We learn 25-35 drugs every two weeks so it adds up. Wtfmate21@aol.com is my email if you want to get in touch

    - the dreamer
  6. by   msdobson
    Must be the drugs I'm taking, because my math is fine.

    And what kind of ursing program doesn't have a formal Pharmacology class!

    Mike
  7. by   mixyRN
    Quote from msdobson
    Must be the drugs I'm taking, because my math is fine.

    And what kind of ursing program doesn't have a formal Pharmacology class!

    Mike
    Our nursing program does have a formal Pharmacology class, but only 1credit. It was explained that most of the pharm is integrated into the regular program as we learn about diseases & body systems. For example, I just finished 1st semester and we were given a total of ~60-70 meds to learn over the term along with each disease we studied.
  8. by   WDWpixieRN
    Quote from msdobson
    And what kind of nursing program doesn't have a formal Pharmacology class!
    Ours...
  9. by   meandragonbrett
    I would advise to get yourself a good pharmacology book that is broken down into easy reading. Some pharm books are so confusing a PhD could not decipher them. Then just take it system by system. Your vasoactive drugs will probably be your most difficult to sit down and really master. Good luck!
  10. by   KrisVance
    i just finished my first semester of pharm and got an "a" :spin: . (yippee!) i found it really helpful to make a table for each different type of drugs and then make divide it by familes. for example, i took a legal size sheet of paper and made a chart for "antibiotics" then i made a column for each family (sulfa's, penicillins, tetracyclines, etc.). for the rows, i labeled them (moa, indications, se's, adverse events, contraindications, drug interactions, and specific agents.) this helps me see the similarites and differences at a glance while i'm studying. it makes a great reference later on too.
  11. by   msdobson
    Quote from krisvance
    i just finished my first semester of pharm and got an "a" :spin: . (yippee!) i found it really helpful to make a table for each different type of drugs and then make divide it by familes. for example, i took a legal size sheet of paper and made a chart for "antibiotics" then i made a column for each family (sulfa's, penicillins, tetracyclines, etc.). for the rows, i labeled them (moa, indications, se's, adverse events, contraindications, drug interactions, and specific agents.) this helps me see the similarites and differences at a glance while i'm studying. it makes a great reference later on too.
    good tip, kris!
  12. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    My nursing program doesn't have a formal pharm class either. We are taught some in lecture, some in lab, but mostly are required to learn it on our own time.

    We had to pass a test and could only miss 3 questions out of 30, or you would get kicked out of the program. I believe there were about 200 meds, and we had to learn enough to answer application-type questiosn covering side effects, classifications, nursing implications, uses, contraindications, and actions.

    It was not an easy task on top of lecture, lab and clinical.
  13. by   msdobson
    Quote from Fun2Care
    My nursing program doesn't have a formal pharm class either. We are taught some in lecture, some in lab, but mostly are required to learn it on our own time.
    Wow. That must suck.

    I'm not sure if I would sign on for a Nursing program that didn't have a formal Pharm class (aguably the hardest, most demanding subject in nursing school.)

    I wonder what the pass/fail rate is for schools that leave pharmacology to the students "to learn on their own time." I suppose that there are a few who embrace the challenge and do very well, but the others...?

    Also, I wonder why the BON even accredits these schools.

    Food for thought.
  14. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Quote from msdobson
    Also, I wonder why the BON even accredits


    Personally, I think that most of nursing school is 'learn on your own'. I don't think any school covers EVERY topic needed for the NCLEX.


    My school is considered to be extremely hard to get in and extremely hard to stay in, but has a reputation for turning out some of the best nurses. I heard that from the school before going in, and said, "Yeah right...whatever."

    I've also heard that at hospitals, and from people not even in the medical field. (They've heard of the program.)



    There once was a time you had to have 4 physical education credits to be a BSN. ....Now that is what I questioned.



    I think studying pharm mostly on your own, makes you learn it more. You know you can't just listen to a lecture and pass a class. You actually have to 'study' it, and spend lots and lots of time on it!

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