Nursing Tuition off the Chain!! Need Help!! - page 3

Okay so I just got accepted to Drexel University's BSN program. For those of you who may not know anything about Drexel, it is a private University where the cost is 38K+ PER YEAR for tuition ALONE -... Read More

  1. by   psychonaut
    Quote from JoI8815
    ...Drexel's graduates leaves with a lot more knowledge than the graduates from a certificate program or another school....I'm pretty sure that overtime, while you attain your experience, you'll eventually learn more things..
    Oh gosh, that is too funny!

    I think we need to add another level to the never ending debate: ADN vs. BSN vs ... SUPER MEGA ELITE BSN!!!!

    "Perhaps, one day, over time, if you are really, REALLY fortunate, you will EVENTUALLY learn the things that SUPER MEGA ELITE BSNs know from day one..."

    You know, I've never had an attitude towards the ADN, but this gives me a bit more insight into the nerve that is struck by the old debate.

    Really, I am not implying malice in the OPs posts, just a touch of poor phrasing and "open mouth, insert foot."

    Long weekend of night shifts behind me, this chuckle was a good start to my weekend!
  2. by   tfleuter
    However, the money spent wouldn't "just be for your RN" (lovely phrase there by another poster huh?) it would be for a bachelors of science from Drexel. There's often a reason that great programs are considered great programs. You'll likely be taught by leaders in the nursing field, have access to Drexel's nursing resources (labs, simulations, etc) not to mention being able to take advantage of the rest of what Drexel offers....maybe use the elelctives required for your degree to get a minor in another discipline.
    You'll find this type of explaination of costs with any expensive/presitigous school, but the truth is, many of these things you mention are not exclusive to high cost programs. For instance, my "cheap" state university was the first in the state to purchase a state-of-the-art patient simulator last year. I could see where leaders in the nursing field would choose a high profile school to instruct at, but that doesn't mean other surrounding schools are getting the bottom of the barrel instruction either. I know a lot of grads from a certain school in my area like to toute that their nursing school/grads are known nation wide, but nobody has been able to show me anything that proves they fare better in our local economy nor that they move out of state onto bigger and better things.

    Could Drexel be a better school than others? Of course! Is it worth the (extremely) inflated cost for a BSN? Well, I guess that's up to the individual, but I haven't seen a solid argument that has convinced me otherwise. Seems to me that the prestige of a school only matters to those who are prospective students or grads from one.

    And the comment about "only a RN" - I didn't take it as derogatory towards the profession, rather the cost that it should take to obtain the it. In that sense, it is only RN compared to the earning potential of other high paying careers.
  3. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from tfleuter
    <snip>

    Could Drexel be a better school than others? Of course! Is it worth the (extremely) inflated cost for a BSN? Well, I guess that's up to the individual, but I haven't seen a solid argument that has convinced me otherwise. Seems to me that the prestige of a school only matters to those who are prospective students or grads from one.
    <snip>
    I guess that's the crux of it. Can you get a great education at a state school? Of course you can. But to say that there isn't a benefit to going to a top ranked school....well, I think it's naive. For me, I'm looking at my total education.....not just whether I pass NCLEX the first time I take it (I'm not saying you said that, that's just a common attitude). By going to a well known university, I think there are just more options. There are more resources to take advantage of both in and out of the nursing program. There's more research going on, which gives opportunities to gain experience in that area. Plus the things I said before, nursing leaders as faculty, etc.

    Could I have gotten a less expensive education at a community college and a BSN bridge? Sure. Will going to a nationally ranked program automatically make me a better nurse? No of course not, but it can give me the opportunity to be a better educated person with a more diverse experience base. So, for me the extra cost is worth it.

    And no I don't go to Drexel...I do attend a nationally ranked school.
  4. by   K.P.A.
    Quote from JoI8815
    If two people were to interview for the same job, both got their bachelor's degree, one from an Ivy League school and one from a regular school, who do you think they will hire first?
    The guy with clean hands, good character, decent grades, great references, shiny shoes, and a new Lotus! By attending public school, I'll be able to afford a new Lotus! High debt will prevent you from getting most jobs that require security clearance. For me, the accelerated program at the private school is $34k more than at the state school. I asked a couple of managers if school would make a difference and they said, "all we care about is whether or not you can do the job".

    2007 grad nursing program rankings ,usnews

    You might want to do some research on Drexel before spending the extra $.

    Private school is not necessarily better than public school in terms of student experience, research exposure, and reputation in the field.
    Last edit by K.P.A. on Jun 1, '09 : Reason: typo
  5. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from K.P.A.
    The guy with clean hands, good character, decent grades, great references, shiny shoes, and a new Lotus! By attending public school, I'll be able to afford a new Lotus! High debt will prevent you from getting most jobs that require security clearance. For me, the accelerated program at the private school is $34k more than at the state school. I asked a couple of managers if school would make a difference and they said, "all we care about is whether or not you can do the job".

    2007 grad nursing program rankings ,usnews

    You might want to do some research on Drexel before spending the extra $.

    Private school is not necessarily better than public school in terms of student experience, research exposure, and reputation in the field.
    Well, all private schools are not necessarily better than state schools....but surely some are. It is true, there are a lot of great state schools that are top ranked...they tend to be spendy as well, especially if you're out of state. Out of state undergrad tuition at UW (first on the US News & World Report's Grad School list) is $23,220 (just tuition, not fees of any kind) a year. Not as spendy as Drexel....but not cheap, and at Drexel you won't be contending with impacts to your program due to state budget cuts. So, if you just so happen to live in a state that has a top ranked program....I guess you're pretty lucky...everyone else get's to pay more.

    I see you posted a link to US News & World Report's ranking of nursing grad school programs. They list Drexel as a Tier 1 school (note I'm speaking about the school).

    I'm not saying that a degree from a good school will overcome not interviewing well or having lousy references. I'm just saying that not recognizing that there is a benefit to going to a good school....benefits both within and outside of the school of nursing, seems ridiculous.

    To say that you'll have the same educational experience no matter where you go to school....well, it's just not true. I don't understand why folks are so bent about this. I've never said it's the only way to go, or that it's the only way to get a good education, or that the best nurses only go to top schools or anything like that. But to not recognize that there are benefits (of opportunities, experiences and services) that go along with that price tag seems naive at best.
    The only real decision is whether individuals think that those benefits are worth the cost, and even that is not a cut and dried issue. It depends on the person, their personal goals, their professional goals, the resources they have available, etc. I guess I'm just really surprised by the strength of the reaction to this.
  6. by   tfleuter
    Probably b/c of the current shape of the economy, everyone is revaluating the cost of things and what is worth what. Obviously high cost schools have to provide something additional to justify the cost, but is what they are providing worth that price tag?

    I don't think anyone is being naive. I think people view college differently. Some see it as a means to an end, a way to get to the career they want. Others focus more on the experience. If you want to speak to the first group, you need to show them actual proof that a certain school will get them to their goal more efficiently than another school relative to the difference in price. If you are speaking to the second group, then you would emphasize the additional experiences they will enjoy while in the program over others, even if doesn't necessary directly impact their future career goals.

    I care about what people spend on an education b/c I have seen what a burden these high student loan debts can be to people after the college experience is over and done with. There is life outside of education after all.
  7. by   jazz_is_my_game
    Quote from tfleuter

    I care about what people spend on an education b/c I have seen what a burden these high student loan debts can be to people after the college experience is over and done with. There is life outside of education after all.
    Preach! Student loan debt is no joke.
  8. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from tfleuter
    Probably b/c of the current shape of the economy, everyone is revaluating the cost of things and what is worth what. Obviously high cost schools have to provide something additional to justify the cost, but is what they are providing worth that price tag?

    I don't think anyone is being naive. I think people view college differently. Some see it as a means to an end, a way to get to the career they want. Others focus more on the experience. If you want to speak to the first group, you need to show them actual proof that a certain school will get them to their goal more efficiently than another school relative to the difference in price. If you are speaking to the second group, then you would emphasize the additional experiences they will enjoy while in the program over others, even if doesn't necessary directly impact their future career goals.

    I care about what people spend on an education b/c I have seen what a burden these high student loan debts can be to people after the college experience is over and done with. There is life outside of education after all.
    I'm glad you found a program that met your needs.

    I know my needs included being educated beyond prepping for a test or a job, because you're right...there is life outside of education, although I feel it's my education that has prepared me for it.

    I also agree that graduating into overwhelming debt is not a great plan. But there are always ways to pay for school that don't include overwhelming debt, it takes some work, sacrifice and planning to work it out, but there are always ways. I'll have less than $20,000 debt for both my undergrad and grad degree (which I'm also planning on getting from a top 5 school). I'll have it paid off a few years after graduation.

    I wish you the best in pursuing your goals.

    Peace,
    CuriousMe
  9. by   JoI8815
    Quote from CuriousMe
    I guess that's the crux of it. Can you get a great education at a state school? Of course you can. But to say that there isn't a benefit to going to a top ranked school....well, I think it's naive. For me, I'm looking at my total education.....not just whether I pass NCLEX the first time I take it (I'm not saying you said that, that's just a common attitude). By going to a well known university, I think there are just more options. There are more resources to take advantage of both in and out of the nursing program. There's more research going on, which gives opportunities to gain experience in that area. Plus the things I said before, nursing leaders as faculty, etc.

    Could I have gotten a less expensive education at a community college and a BSN bridge? Sure. Will going to a nationally ranked program automatically make me a better nurse? No of course not, but it can give me the opportunity to be a better educated person with a more diverse experience base. So, for me the extra cost is worth it.

    And no I don't go to Drexel...I do attend a nationally ranked school.
    Thank you sooo much....All of your posts express exactly how I feel about education. I think that some people are responding from their emotions and not logic. Nobody is saying that a nurse with a BSN is better than a nurse with an ADN degree or what not. Its just that some people have different ambitions and they are looking for something more than just being able to pass the NCLEX and becoming a nurse...[I will express this more after I respond to a certain person....]
  10. by   JoI8815
    Quote from psychonaut
    Oh gosh, that is too funny!

    I think we need to add another level to the never ending debate: ADN vs. BSN vs ... SUPER MEGA ELITE BSN!!!!

    "Perhaps, one day, over time, if you are really, REALLY fortunate, you will EVENTUALLY learn the things that SUPER MEGA ELITE BSNs know from day one..."

    You know, I've never had an attitude towards the ADN, but this gives me a bit more insight into the nerve that is struck by the old debate.

    Really, I am not implying malice in the OPs posts, just a touch of poor phrasing and "open mouth, insert foot."

    Long weekend of night shifts behind me, this chuckle was a good start to my weekend!
    I am so glad to be able to amuse you...I really hope you did have a good weekend...However, the tone of your post suggest just a hint of sarcasm and I just wanted to say that nobody was saying that a nurse with a BSN degree is better than a nurse with an ADN degree... But If you are looking to just get the job...well the ADN is for you. However, the FACT is that a nuse with a BSN degree is more diverse in not just hands on nursing but other sciences such as Psychology, Chemistry, Philosophy etc. That's why it takes so much longer to earn a BSN degree and also why magnet hospitals PREFER nurses with this degree. You may be offended by this truth if you have and ADN degree but I have done my research and studies have shown that nurses with their BSN degree are more all-rounded in their general education...BUT are equally good as nurses with their ADN. The FACT is, after I recieve my BSN degree, I would have taken more classes and therefore know more than a person with an ADN who does not have a Bachelor's degree and I'm not just talking about nursing. If that truth is so offensive to you, I guess you have some growing up to do.

    Like someone else said, everyone is looking for something different in their educational goals. My mother have been trying to get me to do the certificate thing for the longest but my ambitions are different from hers as well as other people...not trying to sound stuck up or anything, but some people want more than just their license. Is that so hard to accept?
  11. by   JoI8815
    I was typing really quickly so forgive the typo errors
  12. by   tfleuter
    thank you sooo much....all of your posts express exactly how i feel about education. i think that some people are responding from their emotions and not logic. nobody is saying that a nurse with a bsn is better than a nurse with an adn degree or what not. its just that some people have different ambitions and they are looking for something more than just being able to pass the nclex and becoming a nurse...[i will express this more after i respond to a certain person....]
    actually, it is your views that i would say come from emtions and not logic. i have used specific questions and answer to demonstrate that in the career world, those who graduate from a less expensive program are at no disadvantage compared to those who went to a pricey school. i do see a distinct advantage over having a much smaller debt load coming out of school since both grads will (assumably) be competing for the same this is not a discussion pertaining to adn vs. bsn, because many, many institutions offer bsns for the fraction of a cost as some high profile schools.

    those that insist that you will gain something extra from a pricey program have yet to give real specifics and facts as to how a bsn that cost 3,4 5x the amount will enrich you further (with the exception of one poster). i see a lot of ideas, and vague suggestions about the experience and additional education, but if this doesn't translate into additional success after school, well logically the math isn't adding up. of course, your own pesonal defination of success will vary and could make the difference.

    here's a logical analysis of where some of us are possibly coming from, so you don't assume we are all reacting with our emtions b/c we couldn't go to a big prestigious school:

    graduate with a bsn for $80,000, 10 yr loan at 6.8%:
    monthly loan payment: $920.64

    graduate with a bsn for $15,000, 10 yr loan at 6.8%:
    monthly loan payment: $172.62

    lets see, thats an extra $748.02 a month that the person with the smaller loan is enjoying. that's practically a mortgage payment. in 6 months that enough money to go on a vacation to other countries and see the world! its money that could be put aside for a nice, extremely comfy retirement or your kids' college education. its attending cultural events every weekend if you so choose or a trip to disney every year with the family. you can do a lot of things with the extra $700+ a month that will lead to many fun, educational and cultural experiences. sounds like a deal to me....

    sorry if these affends those who have choosen to attend expensive schools, because thats not how it's meant. i do grow tired of the side remarks that suggest those who will only spend so much for a degree are somehow only concerned with passing an exam or being average nurses. that if someone wants to excel in their career thent s/he would obviously see the value of a pricey education.
  13. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from tfleuter
    <snip>

    Graduate with a BSN for $80,000, 10 yr loan at 6.8%:
    Monthly loan payment: $920.64

    Graduate with a BSN for $15,000, 10 yr loan at 6.8%:
    Monthly loan payment: $172.62
    <snip>
    The assumption being of course that someone would for some reason finance their entire education via student loans? I said I value education enough to spend more when warranted, not that I thought taking $80K of loans is wise. I don't believe anyone said that. I think where we differ is your solution for not taking $80K in loans is to change your school, mine is to find support.

    And just to be clear...I was never offended, just surprised that anyone would be against getting as much and the best education one could manage.

    And the comments I made re: wanting to be educated for more than an exam or job came from the explanations that XYZ CC does just as good a job, and that we should just look at the NCLEX pass rates; with the implication that anything past that is unnecessary and anyone considering it is wastefull. The snarkyness has definitely gone both ways.

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