It will take me 7 years just for a bsn.

  1. I am 19 going into 2nd year of college. It's going to take me 5 years( 1 down 4 left to go) to get a 2 year degree (adn) because of prerequisites. Im going to a community college so I don't have to take out loans. Then I'm assuming to do an online bridge program for my bsn will be around 2 years. This is really discouraging and I feel like it's a ridiculous amount of time since people only spend 4 years for the exact same degree. Idk if it's just stupid to continue this route but what if it's my only option? Should I do it anyway since I wanna be a nurse. All other schools by me are way more expensive yet faster and would require loans. What do I do. Another thing that makes this so discouraging is all I see on here is how hard it is to find a job.
  2. Visit futurernmaybe profile page

    About futurernmaybe

    Joined: Aug '18; Posts: 1; Likes: 2

    33 Comments

  3. by   TriciaJ
    If you want to be a nurse (no such word as "wanna") and your present plan is your only option, then it's your only option. It is understandable that you don't want to spend any more time than you have to, but there certainly is merit in not racking up a pile of debt.

    Why don't you sit down and make a grid of all your possible options, all the factors involved and a list of pros and cons for each? As far as being hard to find a job, you have to do some actual research into the area where you hope to find a job. If it appears that it will be difficult, would you be willing to relocate to an area of higher demand?

    Would you not have prerequisites before being admitted to a four-year university program? Take a closer look at all the variables, then make your decision. Good luck.
  4. by   klone
    Online RN-BSN programs don't have to take 2 years. Find one that doesn't. You can work as an RN while you're getting your BSN.

    I'm surprised that it's taking you 3 years to complete all your prerequisites. Are you sure that's accurate? How many credits are you taking a term?
  5. by   llg
    5 years for a 2-year degree is excessive. How many courses are you taking per semester? I wouldn't do that. I would find another route .... another school ... etc.

    While I recommend you avoid a large amount of debt, if taking out a SMALL loan would let you take more courses at a time to speed things up by a year or 2 might be well worth it. Delaying your entry into the professional-level workforce is expecting. Every year you delay is a year's professional salary that you are foregoing. Do the math and figure out the right balance for you.
  6. by   cleback
    Many people spend years after graduating a 4 yr school paying off debt. Sometimes that holds up buying a house, starting a family, etc. So while it takes more time up front, you won't be behind overall. Also think of the resume and career connections you will be buidling during that time.
  7. by   Davey Do
    I just wanna say
    Quote from TriciaJ
    (no such word as "wanna") .
    (sorry TriciaJ) that it took me 14 years to get my 2 year degree.
    Quote from llg
    5 years for a 2-year degree is excessive.
    Not if the "R" in RN stands for remedial!

    Being young and free and working at various jobs and experiencing life was importatnt to me and I do not regret my decisions.

    Do what you wanna (oops!) do, futurernmaybe!

    And welcome to AN.com!
  8. by   OldDude
    Quote from Davey Do
    I just wanna say

    (sorry TriciaJ) that it took me 14 years to get my 2 year degree.

    Not if the "R" in RN stands for remedial!

    Being young and free and working at various jobs and experiencing life was importatnt to me and I do not regret my decisions.

    Do what you wanna (oops!) do, futurernmaybe!

    And welcome to AN.com!
    It's twoo, it's twoo! It took me 5 years to complete a 2 year ADN program...graduated at age 43.
  9. by   CharleeFoxtrot
    Quote from OldDude
    It's twoo, it's twoo! It took me 5 years to complete a 2 year ADN program...graduated at age 43.
    6 years for me as I had to work full time through the pre reqs and I graduated when I was (COFF COFF WHEEZE) years old.
  10. by   KelRN215
    At 19, I think you should just transfer to a 4 year university and get your BSN. There are no affordable state schools in your area?
  11. by   Ashley_SF
    It took me 6 years to get my BSN. I didn't get into nursing school my first time around, (hello bay area competition). Once in nursing school I did not pass pathophysiology the first time and had to stay behind a semester to retake the class, thus delaying my graduation even further. We each have our own path and we take it one step at a time. I have many friends who went through accelerated programs and are paying off massive amounts of debt. I sleep easier at night without it.

    Only you can decide what will work best for you. If you haven't already, I would sit down with a career counselor/adviser at the college to help map out your options.
  12. by   Wannabenurseneko
    Quote from klone
    Online RN-BSN programs don't have to take 2 years. Find one that doesn't. You can work as an RN while you're getting your BSN.

    I'm surprised that it's taking you 3 years to complete all your prerequisites. Are you sure that's accurate? How many credits are you taking a term?
    The only way I see this happening is, if she is only taking one class every semester. Maybe the op is having trouble paying for the classes.
    Last edit by Wannabenurseneko on Aug 13
  13. by   djh123
    If it's what works for you, then do it. And as far as how long - those years will go by faster than you think. Hang in there.
  14. by   AAOnc22
    If you want to be a nurse and it's your only option, then it's your only option! Nursing is my second degree and I went into my ADN program when I was 25. I went for an ADN and now currently finishing my RN-BSN program online. I went this route instead of an accelerate BSN route at a 4 year school because it is SOOO much cheaper, and I became an RN about a year faster. I already had a lot of debt and didn't want more. I was able to finish my ADN in two years while working full time and paying tuition out of pocket. It's not easy and sometimes I was spending 68 hrs a week at the hospital because of clinical and working as a CNA, but it was worth it to not have the debt, in my opinion. Now I am working as an RN at a large hospital while I finish my BSN online. I am taking my time with the BSN and paying it off as I take the classes since my job doesn't require the BSN right now. I just can't imagine having more debt that I already do. So I totally understand where you are coming from.

    If you really want to be a nurse, then go for it. If you really don't want a mountain of debt (trust me, you don't), then take your time. Jobs will be there when you are done with school. I found that New Grad Residency programs were super beneficial because you are only competing against other new grads for a job, not a whole pool of other, experienced nurses. I did not need my BSN for the new grad residency.

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