I am scared of pathophisiology

  1. Last semester I failed Patho, Now this fall Iam going to retake it. Please does any one know how best I can study for this class?. I am realy Worried.
  2. Visit goodperson profile page

    About goodperson

    Joined: Aug '08; Posts: 9

    17 Comments

  3. by   Daytonite
    use the critical thinking flow sheet for nursing students. save and complete them later on in nursing classes.
  4. by   nicolegrow
    I didn't take patho as a seperate class. We learned dx pathos as we went along. Why do you have to take it as a seperate class?
  5. by   HumptyDumpty
    Study exactly what the professor wants you to learn. Don't bother yourself memorizing little, pointless facts because this will overload your brain. I believe many people in my class that failed didn't understand what was important and what was not. Study ONLY what the professor wants you to study. I made an A in patho and this is all I did. Heck, I never even opened the book, I just studied the power points.
  6. by   goodperson
    I dont know why you did not do PATHOPHYSIOLOGY as a seperate course Nicole most nursing schools do please what is the name of your school
  7. by   goodperson
    Can sombody tell me that I can pass Patho, that I can Do it, I use to think that I am Smart untill I fail Pathophysiology and now I have to face it again this semester. SOMEBODY PLEASE HELP.
  8. by   goodperson
    Please tell me your school
  9. by   HumptyDumpty
    Quote from goodperson
    Can sombody tell me that I can pass Patho, that I can Do it, I use to think that I am Smart untill I fail Pathophysiology and now I have to face it again this semester. SOMEBODY PLEASE HELP.
    Just relax. Study what you need to study. If you are having difficulty understanding a certain concept, read the pertinent material over and over again until you understand it. When test time comes around, walk in confident, read the question, and select the first answer that you believe is correct. If you are stumped on a certain question, skip it and move on. You can do this. Anyone can.
  10. by   pinkiepie_RN
    Get a study guide like "Pathophysiology Made Incredibly Easy", cozy up with your A & P book for basic reference, and make sure you know your stuff. Patho for me was very similar to taking A & P II and I studied the same way. Use interactive study methods (websites, matching, etc.) and keep outlines of the course material so you can remember the big picture. Do cases studies to make sure you can apply the information. Form a study group and use flash cards if they work for you. Patho was one of my worst subject first year but I managed a B- out of it and moved on. I picked up things patho related much better in Med/surg after re-calling things I'd learned from patho the semester before.
  11. by   amjowens
    I am taking Pathophysiology and Med/SurgI next semester. A lot of my classmates are choosing to take Patho this summer JUST so they won't be behind a semester if they were to take it in the Fall and not pass! So, they are signing up for Summer and Fall Patho so if they fail in the summer, they've got a chance for Fall. YOU ARE NOT ALONE in having to take it a second time. Apparently, for some people, it's part of the plan.

    There's just no way around the basics of studying, tuning into what the professor expects of you, and pretty much spending time and putting forth effort. For all of my nursing classes so far, I've tried to read before class so that I have a general idea, then attend class, and after, the book helps with the notes (and usually follows the notes very closely). I don't get negative or especially, hang around the negative, as it's like a black hole that will hold you back. Focus on what you know and can do, and move forward. Turn you having to take Path over again as something positive-you want to know the info, and obviously didn't get it the first time, so here's your opportunity to learn.

    I do notice that you haven't spelled patho correctly, and not to be a jerk, but if you're missing the one title that you probably saw over and over on your book, then that might make me wonder what else you might be overlooking. In nursing, it's all about detail as to what makes it or breaks it-the small stuff counts..
  12. by   pinkiepie_RN
    Quote from goodperson
    Can sombody tell me that I can pass Patho, that I can Do it, I use to think that I am Smart untill I fail Pathophysiology and now I have to face it again this semester. SOMEBODY PLEASE HELP.
    You need to learn to think positively yourself. No one can tell you that you can do it without knowing you personally. If you want it, tell yourself that you can do it. People take and pass patho all the time. It has nothing to do with you not being smart...passing a class has to do with application of information and performance on exams. What did you do wrong or miss when you took it before? What kind of grades were you getting? Was it just one thing that drove you over the edge?
  13. by   nicolegrow
    I attended Cuyahoga Community College. It is a two year program that earns an Associate of Applied Science in Nursing and I am transfering to Cleveland State to obtain my BSN in a one year bridge program. No patho class. All the courses are integrated, you learn everthing together as you go. 1st semester is assessment, 2nd med/surg, 3rd ob/peds/psych, 4th critical care. I obtained alll the other related courses beforehand (A&P, microbiology, ect..) The schedule is very full. 2 days of lecture, 2 days of clinical, and 1 lab day every week. I would have preferred to go to CSU or CASE to begin with, but they don't have an evening/weekend program for BSN. However the bridge program is mostly online and requires only one day of class per week. I have 3 children(6yr, 3yr, 10 months) so the timing of the classes makes a big difference.
  14. by   goodstudentnowRN
    Hmmm...You can pass patho..I did it but I just pay attention in class and study what the teacher discuss. I believe patho is not very hard...you just need to diferentiate the disease processes and be aware of the symptoms and nursing care. Please do not be too anxious, jusr rell youself that you are going to make it this time

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