How time consuming is it?

  1. I'm starting the nursing portion of my BSN this fall. I do not have a job, kids, etc, and will be able to put all my energy into school. How much time should I expect to put in a day for NS, especially if I want to keep my GOA high?
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    About 2bJoshRN9788

    Joined: Jul '08; Posts: 104; Likes: 11

    22 Comments

  3. by   sproeber89
    I just finished my first semester of Nursing School ADN program. I also don't have kids and I'm not married (currently the only one in our full time program who isn't married with kids). I work 5 days a pay period at a Nursing Home. I can honestly say that it is currently the hardest thing I have ever done, I usually dedicate at least 2 hours if not more on the days I work, and more if I have off (usually around 6 hours) in addition to clinical days and work days.

    However, my personal opinion is that it's almost better if you work. I work the most out of all my clinical group, yet I am easily the least stressed out. I think it helps to have the work break up your life. The rest of the group seriously spends everyday studying all day. They worry about every little thing and it stressed them out.
  4. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Our adviser told us to plan on 40-50 hours a week between, class, study, clinical and travel.

    I don't know how true that is because I don't start until this fall, I don't work but I am married to a tool and I have 4 kids, so if I can do it you can to
  5. by   deftonez188
    It's more work in the beginning because you don't know anything about anything - later, as you start to integrate your knowledge, you find yourself not breaking your neck to study as hard.
  6. by   RossayRN
    Depends on you and how fast you can grasp things. It doesn't get easier, it gets harder as you progress through the program (the content) I study about 6 hours a day with one or two days off once in a while. I have kids and don't work. It depend on you. they told us 50-60 hours a week of study. I come close if not more. The first couple of semesters was alot of studying but with every semester so far, I have not slacked on it. To each his/her own.
  7. by   ange26s
    I definitly spent anywhere from 40-60 hrs a week on NS. It was more time consuming the first couple semesters, but the content definitly became harder after each semester. I know people who didn't spend as much time as I did and their grades did reflect it. If you want to keep your GPA high, plan to have no life. Im not trying to scare you, but its hard to comprehend the amount of work, time, and energy you have to put into NS until you are in it. GOODLUCK and STAY POSITIVE!!
  8. by   gillytook
    I spent 40-60 hours studying the first semester. Around 30 the rest of the semesters unless I had a care plan due. Then it was closer to 40. I worked and had 1 child that I share custody. I found that even though the content got more complex, I learned it quicker as each semester progressed because it sort of built on itself. There came a point when things "clicked". After that studying got easier. I also learned to study smarter and only focused on the information I had not grasped yet rather than going over and over everything.
  9. by   pharmgirl
    I spend around the same. 40-60 hours. In our syllabus it states that students are expected to study 4 hours for every credit hour. Ours is a 10 credit hour program so that is about right. Toward the end of this year, I found myself slacking off but still made the same grades. I think the above poster was right when they said things start to "click" and studying got easier cause you just kinda "get" the thought process. Good Luck
  10. by   Bicster
    Quote from 2bJoshRN9788
    I'm starting the nursing portion of my BSN this fall. I do not have a job, kids, etc, and will be able to put all my energy into school. How much time should I expect to put in a day for NS, especially if I want to keep my GOA high?
    I spend 5 hours the day before every test, and usually 4-6 hours the day of every test. Thats it. This isnt rocket science. I have a 4.0 and I destroyed the HESI.

    Go to every class and take good notes. My classes are full of overstudyers and those who claim to overstudy, they are dropping like flies. I have a couple friends in med school, and they rarely break 30hrs of studying outside of class. I have NO idea what people are doing studying 40-60hrs.
  11. by   SnowRain7489
    2bJoshRN9788-DO NOT put all your energy into school, you'll ware your body out, it's not healthy
    sproeber89-I agree w/ u on working while in school, it does take the stress off. I believe the most u should work is 1 day/week though.
    ange26s-Yes, noone understands RNschool unless ur in it/have gone through it!
    pharmgirl-It was/is HARD for the info to "click." How did u understand the thought process behind RN classes?
  12. by   smiley2526
    I think 2hrs/day and more on weekends sounds good. A little each day will leave you time to still have fun and be social. I have a few students in my class who also don't have kids or are not married, they still go out and party and have fun. I'm not one of them but I'm happy being a mom and wife it's just I get less sleep (my 2hrs is when everyone is sleep). You'll do great you just have to find what works for you because it may not be the same as everyone else. My best advice is have FUN with it. You're gonna see lots of cool stuff and make lots of great friends. Good Luck.
  13. by   HumptyDumpty
    Quote from Bicster
    I spend 5 hours the day before every test, and usually 4-6 hours the day of every test. Thats it. This isnt rocket science. I have a 4.0 and I destroyed the HESI.

    Go to every class and take good notes. My classes are full of overstudyers and those who claim to overstudy, they are dropping like flies. I have a couple friends in med school, and they rarely break 30hrs of studying outside of class. I have NO idea what people are doing studying 40-60hrs.
    God, I could not agree with you more... After 5-6 hours of studying, I don't know what else to study. 40-60hrs??? Jeez, what the heck are you studying? Careplans taking people 4-10 hours?! Seriously? Just dig into your nursing diagnosis book, pick a diagnosis, and copy down interventions. This should take 30 minutes. Seriously, to the OP, do not listen to most of these people, NS is not hard. If you have any sense, studying a day or two before tests should suffice. There is absolutely no point in reading through most of these nursing books, most of it is complete BS anyways.
  14. by   CRBRNCPHT
    I didnt study very much in nursing school. 4-5 hours the day before the test (interspersed with various TV and food breaks of course). I also didnt read my textbooks at all.

    What will really get you is the paperwork and prep for clinicals. We did alot of pre-clinical prep in my program and the care plans were a nightmare....we're talking 15+ solid hours working on a care plan. Our instructors required VERY detailed care plans and alot of them wouldnt allow us to use care plan books at all so we would have to go looking for journal articles and stuff and that takes FOREVER. That may not sound too bad but it will get you when you have 3 different classes/clinicals going at once.

    Of course, we can all tell you what our experience was but this all depends on how much study time you need, your program, and your instructors. The instructor and how picky they are really makes all the difference.

    I was able to work a little...like 4 days a month which I scheduled according to when assignments were due and when I had tests. I also planned an out of town wedding and got married during nursing school.
    Last edit by CRBRNCPHT on May 9, '09

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