Help! Done with ASN program since July and still not able to take boards.....

  1. Good Afternoon Fellow and Future Nurses.
    I been coming on allnurses for months now and finally decided to post, hoping to get the help I need. So I attended this school in South Florida it's not accredited btw. Last day of school was the first or second of July. Took Exit at the End of August or maybe the beginning month of Sep, passed first time with a 961 (Hesi). So far im the only student in the class who's paid all financial obligations, first and the only one to take exit because the other students still haven't paid all their tuitions. Im ready to take boards and the owner of the school doesn't want to jusr send one student name. Is it legal or fair for him to do so? A graduation date has yet to be told and this owner make changes with each passing day. Please if someone or anyone can help I'd really appreciate it.
  2. Visit LPN_SLIM profile page

    About LPN_SLIM

    Joined: Oct '18; Posts: 2; Likes: 4

    38 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    I bet I already know the name of the school.

    But- your best bet (after calling the Board of Nursing) is to go to the media. TV reporter would love to do a story on this- mention the nursing shortage (seriously)
  4. by   Luchador
    This should be a front page article on this website and a clear warning on why people should avoid unaccredited schools.
  5. by   tonyl1234
    Quote from Luchador
    This should be a front page article on this website and a clear warning on why people should avoid unaccredited schools.
    Tons of reputable schools aren't accredited. It's a very complex system that factors in completion rates, and for nursing, NCLEX pass rates. It's not fair to lots of very good schools out there to just assume that if they're not accredited that you should avoid them. Because of the high fail rate in nursing school, it's very likely that your choice of college isn't accredited. And as a student, all that means to you is some classes probably won't transfer towards another degree. But that doesn't mean that your ADN or BSN from a non-accredited school is a terminal degree for you. It just means you're probably retaking microbiology, maybe A&P, you know, the general classes.

    An RN is an RN.

    What matters as a student is that the school is approved by the state BON. And obviously pass/fail rates should matter since that gives you a general idea of the quality of education.

    Schools like the OP, they're just crap schools. It should just be a lesson learned. But regardless, she passed, and she paid in full. He owes her a diploma. Tell him to send her info so she can test, or she'll have a lawyer tell him to. That'll probably change his mind very fast.
  6. by   Luchador
    Quote from tonyl1234
    \ Because of the high fail rate in nursing school, it's very likely that your choice of college isn't accredited. .
    No, because I only applied to accredited schools.

    You are right that at the end of the day, an RN is an RN, but there are a legion of issues that unaccredited schools make you vulnerable to. And you really don't have any recourse.

    This poster is not the first to get f'd over by profit-driven unaccredited schools. After paying lots of money for to her for-profit school I'm sure she has $1500 laying around to retain a lawyer to handle this.
  7. by   tonyl1234
    Quote from Luchador
    This poster is not the first to get f'd over by profit-driven unaccredited schools. After paying lots of money for to her for-profit school I'm sure she has $1500 laying around to retain a lawyer to handle this.
    He doesn't know that. All he knows is that he's holding her diploma hostage behind other people paying their bills. He already lost. If she has a receipt that she's paid in full and that she completed the program, she doesn't need a lawyer. Go to court, "here's my reciepts, here's my grades." Then it's over. She won.
  8. by   LPN_SLIM
    Thank you all for taking the time out to comment on my post. Honestly appreciate it. I will be contacting channel 7 news and look forward to speaking to a Lawyer as well to further help me. BTW I did call FL BON and I was told this owner can send one student at a time as long as he puts a graduation date on my transcript. He also refuses to release my transcripts to me.
  9. by   Luchador
    Quote from tonyl1234
    He doesn't know that. All he knows is that he's holding her diploma hostage behind other people paying their bills. He already lost. If she has a receipt that she's paid in full and that she completed the program, she doesn't need a lawyer. Go to court, "here's my reciepts, here's my grades." Then it's over. She won.
    "Go to court".
    Which court? Small claims? Civil? Does she know how to file suit? What if they question her standing because she signed off on their terms when she enrolled?
  10. by   tonyl1234
    Quote from Luchador
    "Go to court".
    Which court? Small claims? Civil? Does she know how to file suit? What if they question her standing because she signed off on their terms when she enrolled?
    Do the terms specifically say that she won't be eligible to test until enough students are eligible to test? Most likely, no, it doesn't. And if it does, that's illegal.

    By law, if her debt is paid, he owes her a diploma. He has to release her transcripts. He has to let her sit for her exam. He CANNOT hold all of that back because he doesn't only want to send one. She won in court already. Florida does not allow schools to do this just because they fell like it. Law always takes priority over a contract.

    I'd use a lawyer to file the motion, because that'll guarantee that it's written correctly, and that the right state and federal laws will included as evidence. But then after that, it's over. She won, and that school is paying for her lawyer and the filing fee with the court. He's not going to defend it, and if he does, he already lost, because again, law takes priority.
  11. by   Luchador
    Quote from tonyl1234
    Do the terms specifically say that she won't be eligible to test until enough students are eligible to test? Most likely, no, it doesn't. And if it does, that's illegal.

    By law, if her debt is paid, he owes her a diploma. He has to release her transcripts. He has to let her sit for her exam. He CANNOT hold all of that back because he doesn't only want to send one. She won in court already. Florida does not allow schools to do this just because they fell like it. Law always takes priority over a contract.

    I'd use a lawyer to file the motion, because that'll guarantee that it's written correctly, and that the right state and federal laws will included as evidence. But then after that, it's over. She won, and that school is paying for her lawyer and the filing fee with the court. He's not going to defend it, and if he does, he already lost, because again, law takes priority.
    Litigation is a bit more complicated than "you won, he lost because law"
  12. by   elkpark
    Quote from tonyl1234
    Because of the high fail rate in nursing school, it's very likely that your choice of college isn't accredited.
    ??? Maybe it's just me, but I don't understand what this is supposed to mean. What does "the high fail rate in nursing school" have to do with whether or not a college is accredited?
  13. by   Chrispy11
    Quote from elkpark
    ??? Maybe it's just me, but I don't understand what this is supposed to mean. What does "the high fail rate in nursing school" have to do with whether or not a college is accredited?
    Accreditation can be taken away. Heard rumors of an expensive private college losing theirs due to the small % passing the NCLEX.
    Can Schools Lose Accreditation?
  14. by   elkpark
    Quote from Chrispy11
    Accreditation can be taken away. Heard rumors of an expensive private college losing theirs due to the small % passing the NCLEX.
    Can Schools Lose Accreditation?
    I'm aware of that. I guess that may be what that poster meant, that, even if you are attending an accredited school, it could lose its accreditation while you're in school. That's usually a fairly lengthy process, though; schools are given opportunities to fix a problem for quite a while before it gets to the point of a school actually losing accreditation or BON approval and, in my observations over the years, it v. rarely comes down to a school losing accreditation. It would have to be a truly egregious situation. If people go to legitimate schools with decent track records, there v. little chance that would ever be a concern.

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