Have you ever made a med error? - page 5

i'm a senior rn student & i made my first med error last week. the nursing director said if i make another med error i'm out of the program. Has anyone done a med error as a student? i know i'm... Read More

  1. by   Klasseenurse
    Oh God yes, but not as a student. I thought that I would drop dead from nerves. Thank heavens that no harm was done to the patient. There was an incident form to fill out, doctor had to be called, vital signs had to be taken, patient had to be watched for 24 hours, supervisors had to be alerted. I tossed and turned all night thinking about that medication error. I even got up in the middle of the night to call and check up on the patient. My supervisor told me that if I wasn't scared, I wouldn't be a good nurse. So yes, it has happened. Just remember, be extra careful next time and remember that we are human and do make mistakes. Good luck.
    Last edit by Klasseenurse on Oct 19, '06
  2. by   BoonersmomRN
    Not yet but I am only in semester 2/4. The most I have had is 3 clients and I have been able...so far....but it is ALWAYS on my mind...ALWAYS.....
  3. by   i_am_evergreen
    I was actually just kicked out of the nursing program (4th semester) for answering a question about a medication wrong and deciding not to dilute a dose of phenergan an anti-emetic (following the protocol in the drug book). I totally missed that on the sheet it said to dilute with 10 mls of normal saline. I caught it before giving it, but my teacher keeps arguing that i could have killed the patient if i were to administer it undiluted (NOT true). Looong story.
    When she told me that i am being dropped, she went on and on about how unsafe that was, how incompetant i am, how i should never even consider getting back in the program, etc, etc, etc... you get the point. EXTREMELY unprofessional.
    But anyhow, i plan on getting back in hopefully next semester.
    ~Talar~
  4. by   AngelNurse25
    To all of the student nurses, I am a new grad working on a Renal/Diabetes floor with patiens who have multi-system issues. One of the RN's on the floor gave me some really great advise in relation to medication errors. She said "once you give it, you can't take it back"....some medications are exceptions to the rule, d/t antidotes, but you get the point. Just be sure to check, and double check, and triple check. I wish you the best and just take your time checking off meds. BE CAREFUL.... good luck!!

    AngelNurse25:angel2:
  5. by   i_am_evergreen
    Quote from AngelNurse25
    To all of the student nurses, I am a new grad working on a Renal/Diabetes floor with patiens who have multi-system issues. One of the RN's on the floor gave me some really great advise in relation to medication errors. She said "once you give it, you can't take it back"....some medications are exceptions to the rule, d/t antidotes, but you get the point. Just be sure to check, and double check, and triple check. I wish you the best and just take your time checking off meds. BE CAREFUL.... good luck!!

    AngelNurse25:angel2:
    That is great advice. But the thing is that i checked that medication in three different books and 2 mentioned nothing at all about diluting, and 1 stated, "25 mg/ml or less may be given undiluted." The dose was 13.5 mg/ml so I still feel like was not that necessary.
  6. by   AngelNurse25
    Quote from i_am_evergreen
    That is great advice. But the thing is that i checked that medication in three different books and 2 mentioned nothing at all about diluting, and 1 stated, "25 mg/ml or less may be given undiluted." The dose was 13.5 mg/ml so I still feel like was not that necessary.
    I am not sure that kicking you out of the program for not diluting phenergan is really a fair punishment for the crime. You didn't technically make a medication error per the 5 rights, but I think your instructor should have been there with you teaching you that dilution is necessary. I was never taught that in school either, but once I got into the real world I learned to dilute due to the poor veins that our patients tend to have anyway. Sorry they did that to you .
  7. by   i_am_evergreen
    Quote from AngelNurse25
    I am not sure that kicking you out of the program for not diluting phenergan is really a fair punishment for the crime. You didn't technically make a medication error per the 5 rights, but I think your instructor should have been there with you teaching you that dilution is necessary. I was never taught that in school either, but once I got into the real world I learned to dilute due to the poor veins that our patients tend to have anyway. Sorry they did that to you .
    I well it's a long story but you can see why else happened if you go to https://allnurses.com/forums/f17/ven...ml#post1886310
    Still don't think it's fair. I mean what makes it all the worse is the way the talked to me.
  8. by   manettohillnurse
    yes i have. i gave digoxin to a patient who was to have an angioplasty and the dig. was on "hold". fortunately i reported this quickly and there was no harm done. i was in the hospital recently and was the recipient of three med errors one of which could have been fatal. thankfully i had the foresight to ask what the nurse was giving me for pain. i had a red wrist band on stating my allergies, there was a notice on my chart and a sign behind my bed yet i almost received the wrong medication. i think that once you've made one med error, you become especially careful after that. good luck to you in your future career.
    manettohillnurse
  9. by   anilasimon
    I am a practicing RN and I also think med mistake do happen in everyday life and most of them are not getting reported...!!! But, thankfully in my hospital we use the Meditech computer programme which requires the nurse to scan all the medication and also scan the arm band on the patient and if both doesnt match with the MAR list in computer, it will throw you away from administering the medicine..Its such a help. Because of this the medication error is very much minimized.

    But, when you have to do it manually, I think the 3 time check is mandatory to avoid any mistake...As said earlier...learn from the mistake and I am sure you are not going to make any more as you are going to be very very cautious.
  10. by   Gab07
    hi there
    I am in my 3rd year, had yesterday my last exam professional issues, and is bloody scary how easy we can get sued, anyway in more than 20weeks of clinical I never came across with a med, error. here our preceptors (instructors) are very helpfull and I always check the 5rights, plus when I get to the patient I ask him/her to indentify , DOB, etc prior to administer anything, thanks to GOD, till now, no issues with this matter, and now looking forward to get my registration in the next 2-3 mths. Take care ppl, and wish u all the best
    Cheers
  11. by   joanne18931
    I am disappointed that an instructor would tell you to keep quiet about a med error. What a shame and a poor example of what to do in this situation.

    I think your first med error will make you humble to the idea that you are capable of making a mistake. There is no better way to realize the tremendous responsibility you have as an RN. But I also think the way your instructor and classmates (or co-workers once you are practicing) support you will set the stage for how you handle the situation if you ever realize you made another error. The fact that your instructor told you to keep quiet might suggest you think about doing the same on your own. The support you get from others could make you fearful of admitting yet another error. The fear of dismissal from the program is a big one. They can teach you the mechanics of nursing in school but the important thing to realize here is that after all that, it is your responsibility to your patients and to YOURSELF to do the right thing always!

    I once had an instructor who told us that if you ever come across an RN who boasts that she has never made a med error, to keep in mind that she may have made a med error and never even knew it! I'd be wary of someone who claims they have never made an error- it conficts with the very human nature that makes one a "good nurse"! A "good" nurse is not counted by her lack of mistakes to learn by, but the way she learned from them...
  12. by   macspuds
    I find it difficult to believe that someone had NEVER made a mistake in her or his career.
    I commend that person.
    Me I made one and the feeling is like nothing one can ever doscribe. Fortunately it was a stool softener, but it definately made an impression.
    I wonder if people who NEVER make a mistake have wings under their uniforms.
    macspuds
  13. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from i_am_evergreen
    I was actually just kicked out of the nursing program (4th semester) for answering a question about a medication wrong and deciding not to dilute a dose of phenergan an anti-emetic (following the protocol in the drug book). I totally missed that on the sheet it said to dilute with 10 mls of normal saline. I caught it before giving it, but my teacher keeps arguing that i could have killed the patient if i were to administer it undiluted (NOT true). Looong story.
    When she told me that i am being dropped, she went on and on about how unsafe that was, how incompetant i am, how i should never even consider getting back in the program, etc, etc, etc... you get the point. EXTREMELY unprofessional.
    But anyhow, i plan on getting back in hopefully next semester.
    ~Talar~
    My GOD...how stupid of this professor. You'd think that she was Mother Theresa! We are all capable of making mistakes, and this arrogant professor made a mistake by making more of it than what it really was! If you caught it before you actually administered it, that shows that you are, in fact, a viligent nurse. I have caught several errors before I gave medication...and I am 100% sure that this baffoon did as well. I am actually angry for you

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