Denied funding - resolution of excess hours

  1. I just learned that my appeal to the 'resolution of excess hours' denial for my request for financial aid has been denied. They said they will not allow any funding, even with federal loans, for students who have over 100 hours of college (I am an attorney, so have a BA and JD).

    I asked if this was a federal regulation, and she waivered and said no, it was a school policy. I know there have been other students who have had master's degrees and been able to get federal loans for thier nursing degree. I have no experience with financial aid, and am not sure where to turn. Any advice is appreciated! Thank you.
  2. Visit krimicrat profile page

    About krimicrat

    Joined: Jun '09; Posts: 115; Likes: 76
    Extern, Attorney, Mom, Wife and Student.

    22 Comments

  3. by   netglow
    I also have another degree. I didn't attempt financial aid. In order to pursue nursing, I had to dump completely out of my previous career as it required me to be available sometimes around the clock. I worked in a physician's office while taking my sciences that I did not have from my previous degree, and saved money like crazy! I call it camping! LOL. Now that I am in nursing school full time, I don't work, (my physician's hours don't jive with clinical and class hours) and am still camping. You gotta plan your way. You can gain a lot of experience working with a physician as well as teach him/her a thing or two about how to run a business. Good luck.
  4. by   greeniebean
    I know my school does have a cutoff on how many hours you get finacial aid for, but I've never heard there was a loan cutoff to. It probably varies by state and school.
    Perhaps you could apply for scholarships? www.fastweb.com is a good site that matches you to schoarships for free. I've never had a problem using this site.

    You could also apply for private loans. I know the terms of the loan aren't always as good but if there is no other ways to pay for school maybe it would be something to look in to.

    Another option would be to find a hospital that would pay for school and in return you would have to sign a contract to work there for a period of time. If you choose this you should proceed with caution beacuse regardless of whether you end up hating the job you're stuck. You will also have to reimburse them if you fail, drop out, or don't finish the program. Also most won't pay for pre-reqs. I would do extensive research if you went with this option.

    I hope this helped a little. I know how frustrating it can be financing school.
    Good Luck!
  5. by   krimicrat
    Thanks for the replies. I am not able to get private loans. I may look into working at a hospital, etc. I have to work odd hours because we have three children and my DH works full time. We avoid daycare in order to keep costs down as much as possible.

    This is very frustrating. Especially since there are 3 weeks left in my summer session, and I have A's in both classes I hate to see that hard work going down the tubes.
  6. by   netglow
    Hang in there! Yes, heed Mimib's advice about tuition reimbursement from a hospital. Especially since you might have a change of heart (I am assuming no prior healthcare, direct contact tech or support) you don't want to be trapped, and feel overwhelmed attempting to throw yourself into something so full and fast with kids and husband as this will change your life schedule big time. This is why I mentioned a business-type transition into healthcare to start.

    You'd be surprised at how much you don't need to spend! You are gonna need help with the kids though. Start reinforcing (kissing up) those friends/relatives relationships right now!
  7. by   llg
    You're not going to like what I am about to say, but I feel the need to say it anyway. I'm sorry if it makes you angry, but it's the reality of situation -- and sometimes, people need to hear it.

    People are really hurting financially now ... and most (all?) sources of financial aid are being stretched to the max in an effort to fill the needs of people who are truly unable to pay for themselves. As an attorney, you have the ability to earn lots of money, save that money, and pay for school out of your own pocket. It may mean that you have to delay your nursing education ... or work as an attorney doing work you don't like ... or put your kids in daycare while you work ... or do something else that you don't like ... but that's the way life is.

    Past generations had to make great sacrifices to go to college and most people expected to work really hard and make big sacrifices to save enough money for a college education. That is how it is has been for most of history. "Average people" did not expect someone else to give them aid. They knew they had to work hard, sacrifice, save, and THEN they might be able to go to college. In recent years, people have come to expect aid.

    But now, with the economy the way it is ... that expectation has to be revised ... revised back to a vision more closely matching the way it has been for most of history. Aid will be there -- but only for those who either truly need it or for those with exceptional talents or special circumstances who can win scholarships. An attorney who decides to switch careers is not going to be near the top of the list when it comes to giving away free money. The average person is never going to want to give a lot of aid to people who have the potential to pay their own way through school.

    Are there any special circumstances that are preventing you from working and earning some money to pay for your schooling? Other families with 3 children have both parents working full time. In fact, it is very common. Why can't you live off your husband's salary ... and use your law degree to earn more than the cost of day care. Save the remaining money to build a "nursing school fund."
  8. by   krimicrat
    "people are really hurting financially now ... and most (all?) sources of financial aid are being stretched to the max in an effort to fill the needs of people who are truly unable to pay for themselves. as an attorney, you have the ability to earn lots of money, save that money, and pay for school out of your own pocket. it may mean that you have to delay your nursing education ... or work as an attorney doing work you don't like ... or put your kids in daycare while you work ... or do something else that you don't like ... but that's the way life is. "

    your reply assumes so much, both about my life, and about the way things are when one is an attorney.

    you are making a judgment that i should not be allowed to take out a federal loan because i have previous education. i agree that it may not be appropriate to have grants available to people with my education. however, there is no reason to not make federal loans available to people in my situation. this money has to be paid back. for your information, i have never, ever taken any federal grant or loan. my previous education was paid for either through merit based scholarships or through cash. when there is no federal regulation preventing it, the school should not be able to make a judgment about who is 'worthy' or not to receive federal loans as long as all other requirements are met.

    again, this school did not say i didn't meet the requirements. they said they would not provide help...period...even though others who have previous bachelors degrees do get help. this sounds very discriminatory.

    i have decided that my career and education would be complemented by becoming an rn. healthcare law is very important and an emerging field. in the meantime, the flexibility of bedside nursing is what is best for my family. you have no business deciding that my analysis of our financial and family situation is not valid.

    how do you know i am not truly unable to pay for my education? you assume that because i am an attorney that i have more spending money than someone who works at mcdonalds? the old addage about never judging without walking a mile in someone else's shoes....would really do you a lot of good. i will not go into details because i do not need to justify this to you. however, your response is very enlightening - i believe it is exactly the same judgmental attitude that lead to the decision to deny funding - and not following the rules.
  9. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from itsirkmr
    I just learned that my appeal to the 'resolution of excess hours' denial for my request for financial aid has been denied. They said they will not allow any funding, even with federal loans, for students who have over 100 hours of college (I am an attorney, so have a BA and JD).

    I asked if this was a federal regulation, and she wavered and said no, it was a school policy. I know there have been other students who have had master's degrees and been able to get federal loans for thier nursing degree. I have no experience with financial aid, and am not sure where to turn. Any advice is appreciated! Thank you.
    I know it must seem arbitrary, but I think that schools have a limit of how much Federal money (both grants & loans) they can dole out as financial aid. Different schools set different limits on how they disperse those funds, just as there isn't a set EFC (it's set by each school) to receive a Pell Grant, there isn't a federally set cap of hours that they'll fund...even with loans.

    And yes, llg did make some assumptions...but only based on the evidence. She didn't assume you were independently wealthy, she assumed that the earning potential of a lawyer is higher than the earning potential for someone without a college degree. I don't think it would be very hard to find data to back up that assumption.
  10. by   Freedom42
    Schools don't "dole out" federal money. They accept checks sent to them as payment by commercial banks that make money by issuing loans backed by the federal government. All the OP needs is for her school to accept the payment. No other student would be deprived.

    I'm with the OP. As long as all requirements are met, I fail to see on what grounds the school can refuse to accept payment and indirectly put the kibosh on a loan. I had no problem getting a loan with well in excess of 100 hours under my belt. Apparently my school views revenue differently than the OP's.

    I don't think it's fair, either, to make presumptions about the OP's lifestyle, her ability to pay, her ability to save, or whether she is as a result "worthy" of a loan. The government has explicit criteria for student loans. If I were the OP, I'd contact regulatory agencies to find out whether the school's "policy" is even permitted.
  11. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from Freedom42
    Schools don't "dole out" federal money. They accept checks sent to them as payment by commercial banks that make money by issuing loans backed by the federal government. All the OP needs is for her school to accept the payment. No other student would be deprived.

    I'm with the OP. As long as all requirements are met, I fail to see on what grounds the school can refuse to accept payment and indirectly put the kibosh on a loan. I had no problem getting a loan with well in excess of 100 hours under my belt. Apparently my school views revenue differently than the OP's.

    I don't think it's fair, either, to make presumptions about the OP's lifestyle, her ability to pay, her ability to save, or whether she is as a result "worthy" of a loan. The government has explicit criteria for student loans. If I were the OP, I'd contact regulatory agencies to find out whether the school's "policy" is even permitted.
    The only flaw with the logic I bolded is that the school's financial aid office DOES make decisions on who gets federal aid (both grants and loans). Now if what you're saying is that you don't think they should have the right to make that decision...that's another story.

    If it was a private loan, then it would just be a case of the financial aid office accepting the check.

    They're not putting the kibosh on accepting the loan, they are denying her FASFA....by the way, that first A in FASFA is Application....because she's applying for financial assistance. It's not an automatic thing, the financial aid office decides who gets the federal aid allocated to their school. Some schools allow over 100 hours (ie 4 year schools do) but 2 year schools often have a much lower hours limit.

    I do agree that it's not fair to make presumptions aobut the OP's lifestyle, ability to save or "worthiness" of a loan.....but the facts stand that her earning potential is higher than someone without a college degree.
  12. by   llg
    [QUOTE=itsirkmr;3721309
    Your reply assumes so much, both about my life, and about the way things are when one is an attorney.

    .[/QUOTE]

    In my original post, I asked you point blank if there were any specal cicumstance that prevented you from working. That question suggests that I might support your receiving money from the federal government (ie. taxpayers) if there are special circumstances. But neither of your posts provides any justification why the taxpayers should help pay for your continued education. If you can't get a job as a lawyer, you must have some skills that are marketable.

    And yes, even if your loans are not subsized, the money still comes from the taxpayers. I am glad that there are limits and restrictions as to who is eligible to receive money from the taxpayers. If there were no limits on how much and how often people could borrow money from the taxpayers, some people would spend their entire lives in school -- taking the deferment that student status confers until they died without ever paying it back. If you are ineligible for loans through your school and also ineligible for private loans, there are probably some good reasons for that. If not, then please fill us in on what makes your case so special. Then I might be more supportive.

    Make you case ... a stronger case than "I want your money, but I won't tell you why I deserve it."

    I suggest you look at relatively inexpensive schools and take classes part time. Look for a job with an employer that offers tuition reimbursement. Perhaps you can get a job with a hospital that will help you pay for school. Another good deal would be to work for a college that offered tuition discounts to employees.
  13. by   Freedom42
    Quote from CuriousMe
    The only flaw with the logic I bolded is that the school's financial aid office DOES make decisions on who gets federal aid (both grants and loans). Now if what you're saying is that you don't think they should have the right to make that decision...that's another story.

    If it was a private loan, then it would just be a case of the financial aid office accepting the check.

    They're not putting the kibosh on accepting the loan, they are denying her FASFA....by the way, that first A in FASFA is Application....because she's applying for financial assistance. It's not an automatic thing, the financial aid office decides who gets the federal aid allocated to their school. Some schools allow over 100 hours (ie 4 year schools do) but 2 year schools often have a much lower hours limit.

    I do agree that it's not fair to make presumptions aobut the OP's lifestyle, ability to save or "worthiness" of a loan.....but the facts stand that her earning potential is higher than someone without a college degree.
    Schools do not decide who receives loans. Your FAFSA is reviewed by the federal government, which decides whether to back the loan, then tells the school for how much you've been approved -- and that's set by statutory criteria. If the school has other aid available to offset the loan, such as scholarships or grants, it does decide whether you receive that alternative aid and adjusts the balance of your loan accordingly. But it's the government that decides what you can or cannot afford to pay, and there is no allocation of loan money to schools. It's a commercial enterprise, whether the loan is underwritten by the public or private sector. (There are schools that do not accept student loans, but that's usually because they refuse to comply with federal financial reporting requirements.)

    Whether the OP's earning potential is higher than that of someone who doesn't have a college degree is irrelevent. If she's willing to pay the cost of borrowing the money from the bank, she qualifies.
  14. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from Freedom42
    Schools do not decide who receives loans. Your FAFSA is reviewed by the federal government, which decides whether to back the loan, then tells the school for how much you've been approved -- and that's set by statutory criteria. If the school has other aid available to offset the loan, such as scholarships or grants, it does decide whether you receive that alternative aid and adjusts the balance of your loan accordingly. But it's the government that decides what you can or cannot afford to pay, and there is no allocation of loan money to schools. It's a commercial enterprise, whether the loan is underwritten by the public or private sector. (There are schools that do not accept student loans, but that's usually because they refuse to comply with federal financial reporting requirements.)

    Whether the OP's earning potential is higher than that of someone who doesn't have a college degree is irrelevent. If she's willing to pay the cost of borrowing the money from the bank, she qualifies.
    I obviously don't know how your school handles financial aid....but that's not how my school handles federal aid (grants & loans). The financial aid officer for the school makes decisions on federal financial aid.

    And evidently, earning potential isn't irrelevant. It means the student does have more ability to pay for school themselves.

    It's common to deny federal student loans once a student has a certain number of hours. The school where I did my pre-reqs had the advisers warn pre-nursing students who didn't get in and were looking to apply again for the next year, that if they continued full-time for that year, they could have trouble getting federal financial aid (grants & loans).

close