Denied funding - resolution of excess hours - page 2

I just learned that my appeal to the 'resolution of excess hours' denial for my request for financial aid has been denied. They said they will not allow any funding, even with federal loans, for... Read More

  1. by   krimicrat
    I haven't asked anyone here whether they think I deserve the money, nor have I asked for anyone's sympathy. I have asked for other people with previous education to let me know their experiences with financial aid. I am looking for guidance with financial aid, from those who have experience obtaining it despite having a bachelor's degree.

    I am entirely satisfied with my ability to determine what is best for my family, so I do not need your approval.

    Did you know that in the state in which I live, nurses one with one year of experience make more money, on average, than attorneys with seven years of experience? I turned down two jobs, each with six figure incomes, after graduation from law school because my family is more important than my bank account. I did not want to be the lawyer with a day nanny and a night nanny. I have had excellent jobs doing work I am very proud of, making much less money. I get to decide what is best for my family - not you or a financial aid clerk who is offended that an attorney would seek financial aid for the first time in her life.
  2. by   krimicrat
    Quote from llg
    I suggest you look at relatively inexpensive schools and take classes part time. Look for a job with an employer that offers tuition reimbursement. Perhaps you can get a job with a hospital that will help you pay for school. Another good deal would be to work for a college that offered tuition discounts to employees.
    This is what I did. Instead of seeking a BSN, I thought doing the cheapest thing would be best and thought I'd go for the 2 year degree - getting me out faster and earning quicker. But, looks like that will not be possible at this school. So, I am going to look into a BSN - which will, unfortunatley, be much more expensive. I don't see how that helps the taxpayer...but having worked for the federal government, I know that making sense happens rarely.

    Fortunatley, many of my previous classes shoudl transfer, and more aid should be available because I am not seeking a 2 year degree.
  3. by   Freedom42
    Quote from CuriousMe
    I obviously don't know how your school handles financial aid....but that's not how my school handles federal aid (grants & loans). The financial aid officer for the school makes decisions on federal financial aid.

    And evidently, earning potential isn't irrelevant. It means the student does have more ability to pay for school themselves.

    It's common to deny federal student loans once a student has a certain number of hours. The school where I did my pre-reqs had the advisers warn pre-nursing students who didn't get in and were looking to apply again for the next year, that if they continued full-time for that year, they could have trouble getting federal financial aid (grants & loans).
    My school's process is identical to what's outlined on the government's web pages on the subject. The only loan that's administered at the campus level is the Perkins.

    Earning potential is not material to obtaining a student loan. Nor is an individual's credit. You are eligible to borrow up to a certain amount for each of four years. If you stay in school in the hopes of getting into a program that will take you over that four-year limit once you're admitted, then, yes, you will have problems obtaining some forms of aid.

    It's interesting that one of the arguments is that a loan would cost the taxpayers money. Unless she were to default in the future, how would this cost the taxpayers anything? Is the presumption that she would receive a subsidized student loan?
  4. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from Freedom42
    My school's process is identical to what's outlined on the government's web pages on the subject. The only loan that's administered at the campus level is the Perkins.

    Earning potential is not material to obtaining a student loan. Nor is an individual's credit. You are eligible to borrow up to a certain amount for each of four years. If you stay in school in the hopes of getting into a program that will take you over that four-year limit once you're admitted, then, yes, you will have problems obtaining some forms of aid.

    It's interesting that one of the arguments is that a loan would cost the taxpayers money. Unless she were to default in the future, how would this cost the taxpayers anything? Is the presumption that she would receive a subsidized student loan?
    My Federal Nursing loans are administered on my campus (as in my school made the decision about the loan and holds the loan) and are not Perkins loans (I've never received Perkins loans). Check with your Financial Aid office. You might consider the possibility there's something about my financial aid you don't know....shocking thought, I know.

    Of course federal loans don't consider credit or income. The idea though is that is you have a degree, d/t the increased earning power you have other options to finance school and if you have accumulated more than the cap of credits and don't have a degree, then you're not making adequate progress toward a degree.
  5. by   jpeters84
    I feel the need to respond to llg's post. I think it's time to get realistic about the cost of a modern college nursing education. Community colleges have wait lists of years with no promise of ever receiving admittance. State school are nearly impossible to get in with place like Sacramento State and San Diego state that have 3.9entrance GPAs making nursing school more competitive then med school and placing affordable education out of reach for most nursing students. Private education becomes the only option for many. Not becase we feel entitled to it but because of the current situation.

    Nursing education, even at a community college, is exorbitantly expensive. You can not realistically work very much while in nursing school, it would take years to save up to pay for all your expenses and tuition, books, etc that one would accumulate in nursing school. Even when I had a full scholarship to complete my pre-requisities having to come up with rent, utilities, gas and car insurance, parking, phone bills, health insurance, textbooks, school supplies, really the bare minimum for life I struggled immensely to come up with the money to pay for these items since I could only work so much and still expect to pull the straight A's necessary for admittance. Even in the best of situations it's an uphill, unattainable thing for most people. As you pointed out back in the day a college education was unattainable for most. That's why financial aid was created. Not to lend money to people because they were entitled to it, but because we as a country believe that everyone with the ability, will, and desire to get an education and become proficient in a profession should get the chance to do so and that financial reasons should not be what stands in their way. The more educated we as a country are, the better, more prosperous our country will be.

    Also many people go to college when they are 18. How in the heck are you suppose to know your calling in life when you are 18. Should those that have found their calling in nursing later in life be punished without the opportunity of obtaining a loan because they didn't know from minute one that their passion in life was nursing? Come on...

    I am in the process of completing my second degree in nursing and have been lucky enough to receive substantial help with financial aid. I would have never been able to get this degree without it. And excuse me for tooting my own horn here for a minute but I'm going to be one hell of a good nurse who already volunteers substantial hours at a local non-cost clinic and will benefit my community with my nursing skill knowledge. Trust me, my community, my country will be a better place because of my nursing education. That is what financial aid is about. I'm not spending it on nail salons, and movie tickets. The money is being responsibly spent and will be responsibly paid back, most likely when I sign up for the military when I graduate.

    Who are we to sit back and make judgements on each other on who is deserving of financial aid? If you have the desire and ability and you're going to be responsible in paying back the money why shouldn't someone receive financial aid? I don't care if it's your first or your 50th degree. In fact one could argue that giving financial aid to someone who is getting a second or third degree is a better investment because you know they are capable of finishing a degree program and have better opportunities in place to repay the money.

    Saving for college is the most ideal situation but it is hardly realistic in the educational climate of today. The increasingly skyrocketing costs of a college education means that more and more people are having to seek out financial aid. It's not selfish, it's not entitlement, it's reality.

    Itsirkmr:

    I was originally denied finacial aid as well. I don't know how specifically it got worked out, but I had a professor call back and speak to the head of financial aid and find out what I needed to do to get federal financial aid. The next thing I know they were able to offer me federal financial aid, I was just on financial aid "probation." I think meaning I had a limited time to get this degree and if I was still asking for aid in four years that I would be cutt-off. So my advice to you is to call back and talk to someone else in financial aid. Try to speak to the head of the financial aid department. Try getting their email and send them an email. Also, I have heard of students writing a letter describing their situations, outlining how much they need and what it is going to go to, outlining any financial hardships and sending it to financial aid and then they received some aid assistance. Talk to the nursing school and ask what students in similar situations have been able to do. You cannot be the first person to be in this situation at your school. Keep your head up. Where there's a will there is a way. Welcome to nursing school, where you spend a good majority of your time being a hoop jumper and trying to navigate the frustrating world of getting a nursing education. I wish you good luck.
  6. by   brittany_micah
    The same thing happened to me. I transferred from community college to another and the pre-reqs were not the same. So I am close to 99 hours. I had to file the SAP (student appeal process), write a letter explaining my plan for school, what classes I had to take, why I had to transfer, when I planned on starting the nursing program, etc. Did you try to write a letter or explain why you wanted to be a nurse?

    I understand putting limits on students that have degrees already or that make too much, but they shouldnt be able to stop anyone from getting student loans. Again I do not have any kind of degree yet, my husband works in law enforcement to support myself and our two children. I did not qualify for grants this year because I worked last summer, but if they don't approve me to get loans than I will have to quit school. Good Luck to you and anyone else in our situation!
  7. by   Kundera
    I assume that you are trying to receive financial aid from a community college? To my knowledge, most universities will give you a federal financial aid loan for any "post-bac" classes that you want to complete for a new degree program. At my school the limit is 12,000 in loans for post-bac. If you go to a University, you may also qualify for monies to complete a second degree (again, these are financial aid loans). If going to a public university is an option for you, I strongly suggest you try this route. Also, many private colleges may offer loans to those who wish to return to school.

    Give this lady a break, people! We don't know her circumstances, and we wouldn't want other people passing judgment on ours.

    Best of luck to the op, I hope you figure something out!
  8. by   Aurora77
    I'm surprised that you're not able to get loans. I have a previous undergrad degree, so I had to jump through hoops to be "eligible" for financial aid, but I am eligible for loans. I didn't realize that your school could deny you loan money--it doesn't seem that all they are doing is receiving the money; your FAFSA determines what you are eligible for.

    I would contact your school's fiancial aid office, especially if you know of others that are in similar situations who are receiving financial aid--that seems blatantly discriminatory. For me to be eligible for financial aid, I had to send a letter to a committee that covered what program I'm applying for, the job prospects in that program, my planned course of study, that sort of thing. They got back to me and approved me for finacial aid.

    I love the bizarre notion that some posters have that because you are an attorney you must be rich and trying to deny some more deserving person financial aid. Ignore that nonsense! Good luck to you!!
  9. by   krimicrat
    Thanks! I have decided to pursue a BSN, and changed my FAFSA and spoke with the school, and should be fine. I appreciate all the advice!
  10. by   llg
    Thanks for the update. While it may not have been your first choice, it may work out bet in the long run as it will open up additional career options for you. I wish you the best of luck with it.

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